Teacher Tools and...
Follow
Find tag "teaching"
2.2K views | +0 today
Teacher Tools and Tips
Tools, tips and practices to share with teachers
Curated by Sharrock
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

teaching_controversial_issues.ashx

Today’s young people will grow up to be the citizens of the future: but what that future holds for them is uncertain. We can be quite confident, however, that they will be faced with decisions about a wide range of issues on which people have differing, contradictory views. If they are to develop as global citizens all young people should have the opportunity to engage with these controversial issues. Teachers have a key role in enabling young people to develop the skills they need to do this.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders
Scoop.it!

How to make the world comprehensible to kids: Reading Wars II

How to make the world comprehensible to kids: Reading Wars II | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

"Like other digital reading programs, Newsela uses short online quizzes, taken by students after reading each article, to help evaluate students’ comprehension and adjust their reading level accordingly. Such “formative assessments” ensure that no student is unfairly labeled by an outdated evaluation—another potential advantage of computerized leveling over its paper-and-ink counterpart, which offers no automated way to monitor students’ increasing fluency.

Ironically, these digital improvements on traditional leveled reading arrive just as the practice of leveling itself is coming in for criticism. Commentators like Timothy Shanahan, an emeritus professor of urban education at the University of Illinois at Chicago, and Robert Pondiscio, a senior fellow at the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, an education think tank, have recently argued that leveled reading programs provide students with too little challenge. Better than having each student read at his or her own level, they say, would be asking all students to tackle texts appropriate to their grade level, with teachers supplying help when necessary."


Via Mel Riddile
more...
Les Howard's curator insight, October 8, 2014 3:29 PM

Great post on Close Reading. Includes interesting tool.

Les Howard's curator insight, October 8, 2014 3:30 PM

Great post on Close Reading. Includes interesting tool.

Rescooped by Sharrock from Metaglossia: The Translation World
Scoop.it!

How to improve students' writing

“There is a really big issue in the transition from school to university, and it’s getting bigger,” said Dr Adam Smith, UCL History. He is talking about first-year students and the difficulty they face in adapting to undergraduate essay-writing.

The problem, he says, stems from changes made to the A-Level curriculum over the past 10-15 years. As mark schemes for A-Level essays become more prescriptive, so students grow used to being spoon-fed essay plans. In some cases, that has left them unprepared to deal with the rigours of a university humanities programme.

His Provost’s Teaching Award-winning solution was to create Writing History – a first-year module unlike anything else on the programme.

In just its first year, it was better attended and more popular than any other compulsory course, with 100 percent of students agreeing the course was ‘good’ or ‘very good’. Every feedback respondent also said they’d benefitted from small group teaching – one of the hallmarks of the course – and Dr Smith’s colleagues agree student essays have improved as a result. 

Although he is quick to point out the style and structure of Writing History might not work for every discipline, there are a number of elements that others could find useful. Here are his key tips for improving essay-writing among undergraduates:

 

1 No-one likes generic skills courses, so don’t teach writing in isolation

I didn’t want to create a generic skills course. People find them boring. So we link Writing History to the topics that students are studying in their other modules.

The course kicks off with a few introductory lectures that introduce academic writing and research. After that, we match small student groups to tutors who have expertise in a subject the students are currently studying. As a result, the group can use examples and exercises that make sense to everyone and help them with those other courses.

You can’t artificially divorce content from form. That consideration was really key to the concept of the course and saved it from being a generic skills course that students would probably have hated.

2 Small group teaching offers major benefits

I’m really passionate about this. Across higher education there is still an obsession with contact hours. I think this is misplaced. Students don’t care about contact hours – they care about the quality of the contact.

One of the things that is completely new on this course is we break students into very small groups of three or four. That is what students really like and that’s what’s distinctive about it.

In these small groups, we then set practical writing exercises and discuss them with each other. It’s an opportunity to build confidence and ask questions in a situation that isn’t intimidating. It also gets them into the habit of peer assessment.

I don’t think you can’t replicate that in a standard seminar group or lecture.

3 When it comes to writing exercises, start small

All tutors have some leeway in designing their own tasks. What they have in common is the use of small writing assignments and group discussion.

In advance of my first tutorial session, I set a question relevant to my specialism. Students are asked to email their 150-word responses to me and the other students in the group. Then, in the tutorial, we pick them apart and discuss each other's. Why have they chosen those words? Have they communicated the idea they wanted to get across?

The discipline of writing 150 or 200 words is phenomenally helpful. It doesn’t sound like a lot of work, but is very difficult.

Other tasks include writing a synopsis of a book or condensing an argument in a short paragraph. I also present sentences taken from different parts of an essay and ask them to consider where they may have come from – the intro, the main body or conclusion. From here, we work up to planning and writing essays.

4 There is no formula for a perfect essay, but there are some key principles

A-Level students become used to receiving essay templates and detailed guidance. In Writing History, I present some key principles, but it is vastly less prescriptive than what they would be used to.

Really, the main thing I’m trying to do in laying out principles is explain the terminology tutors will be using in their feedback. I’ve noticed over the years I’ve been teaching that students can be confused by terms such as sources and structure, and I felt we weren’t spending enough time translating them. We are so ingrained in academic writing, we forget how difficult that initial introduction can be.

5 Feedback on the first attempt is crucial

Every History student writes their first essay in the context of this course. They each get to produce a first draft that they can discuss with their tutor. They then get feedback before producing a final draft.

Because students feel they are under a different assessment regime and aren’t sure what is expected of them, they are understandably anxious about writing, so the idea that the first time they give it a go they will get quality feedback on a draft is immensely reassuring.


Via Charles Tiayon
more...
Charles Tiayon's curator insight, September 2, 2014 2:14 PM

“There is a really big issue in the transition from school to university, and it’s getting bigger,” said Dr Adam Smith, UCL History. He is talking about first-year students and the difficulty they face in adapting to undergraduate essay-writing.

The problem, he says, stems from changes made to the A-Level curriculum over the past 10-15 years. As mark schemes for A-Level essays become more prescriptive, so students grow used to being spoon-fed essay plans. In some cases, that has left them unprepared to deal with the rigours of a university humanities programme.

His Provost’s Teaching Award-winning solution was to create Writing History – a first-year module unlike anything else on the programme.

In just its first year, it was better attended and more popular than any other compulsory course, with 100 percent of students agreeing the course was ‘good’ or ‘very good’. Every feedback respondent also said they’d benefitted from small group teaching – one of the hallmarks of the course – and Dr Smith’s colleagues agree student essays have improved as a result. 

Although he is quick to point out the style and structure of Writing History might not work for every discipline, there are a number of elements that others could find useful. Here are his key tips for improving essay-writing among undergraduates:

1 No-one likes generic skills courses, so don’t teach writing in isolation

I didn’t want to create a generic skills course. People find them boring. So we link Writing History to the topics that students are studying in their other modules.

The course kicks off with a few introductory lectures that introduce academic writing and research. After that, we match small student groups to tutors who have expertise in a subject the students are currently studying. As a result, the group can use examples and exercises that make sense to everyone and help them with those other courses.

You can’t artificially divorce content from form. That consideration was really key to the concept of the course and saved it from being a generic skills course that students would probably have hated.

2 Small group teaching offers major benefits

I’m really passionate about this. Across higher education there is still an obsession with contact hours. I think this is misplaced. Students don’t care about contact hours – they care about the quality of the contact.

One of the things that is completely new on this course is we break students into very small groups of three or four. That is what students really like and that’s what’s distinctive about it.

In these small groups, we then set practical writing exercises and discuss them with each other. It’s an opportunity to build confidence and ask questions in a situation that isn’t intimidating. It also gets them into the habit of peer assessment.

I don’t think you can’t replicate that in a standard seminar group or lecture.

3 When it comes to writing exercises, start small

All tutors have some leeway in designing their own tasks. What they have in common is the use of small writing assignments and group discussion.

In advance of my first tutorial session, I set a question relevant to my specialism. Students are asked to email their 150-word responses to me and the other students in the group. Then, in the tutorial, we pick them apart and discuss each other's. Why have they chosen those words? Have they communicated the idea they wanted to get across?

The discipline of writing 150 or 200 words is phenomenally helpful. It doesn’t sound like a lot of work, but is very difficult.

Other tasks include writing a synopsis of a book or condensing an argument in a short paragraph. I also present sentences taken from different parts of an essay and ask them to consider where they may have come from – the intro, the main body or conclusion. From here, we work up to planning and writing essays.

4 There is no formula for a perfect essay, but there are some key principles

A-Level students become used to receiving essay templates and detailed guidance. In Writing History, I present some key principles, but it is vastly less prescriptive than what they would be used to.

Really, the main thing I’m trying to do in laying out principles is explain the terminology tutors will be using in their feedback. I’ve noticed over the years I’ve been teaching that students can be confused by terms such as sources and structure, and I felt we weren’t spending enough time translating them. We are so ingrained in academic writing, we forget how difficult that initial introduction can be.

5 Feedback on the first attempt is crucial

Every History student writes their first essay in the context of this course. They each get to produce a first draft that they can discuss with their tutor. They then get feedback before producing a final draft.

Because students feel they are under a different assessment regime and aren’t sure what is expected of them, they are understandably anxious about writing, so the idea that the first time they give it a go they will get quality feedback on a draft is immensely reassuring.

Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Instructional scaffolding - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Instructional scaffolding

Instructional scaffolding is a learning process designed to promote a deeper level of learning. Scaffolding is the support given during the learning process which is tailored to the needs of the student with the intention of helping the student achieve his/her learning goals (Sawyer, 2006).

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Facilitation tips, games, and energizers « 350.org Workshops

Making your workshop interactive, participatory, and fun will be key in engaging your participants and creating an effective learning environment.  To help, many sessions already have participatory activities built in to the curriculum, and here we provide a number of ideas for energizers, name games, and interactive activities that you can adapt and incorporate to keep your participants energized and ready to learn. Have a great activity or tip to add?  Email us at workshops[at]350.org.

 

Sharrock's insight:

I look at these approaches to explore for teaching in September (the beginning of the school year). Training students to perform daily tasks (handing in homework, noting homework, using classroom website, note taking, etc). It may also be a way to set the tone of the classroom. I see it this way: trainers are often consultants, people outside of an organization. they have to connect quickly, establish presence, establish credibility, and must ultimately engage the people they are training. Any website that collects and specializes in the development of trainers and training, may be a gold mine for teachers to improve on skills. It doesn't matter that training is focused on narrow skills and goals; training is similar to teaching. Often, teachers train students BEFORE educating them. 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Creative Writers
Scoop.it!

Five Brilliant Ideas for Teaching Poetry

Five Brilliant Ideas for Teaching Poetry | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Poetry can be one of the trickiest areas of the curriculum to teach well. How can pupils come to understand a poem without being spoon-fed? How can they engage in personal response when the languag...

Via Sharon Bakar
Sharrock's insight:

for ELA teachers

more...
Sharon Bakar's curator insight, May 14, 2014 5:41 AM

Lovely ideas for teaching poetry.  Hope to have a chance to use these.

Rescooped by Sharrock from iPads in Education
Scoop.it!

The Best Free Web Tools for Engaging Students in 1:1 Classrooms

A list of some of the The Best Free Web Tools for Engaging Students in 1:1 Classrooms, as presented at the Iowa 1:1 Conference in April 2014.

Via John Evans
more...
Melissa Marshall's curator insight, April 30, 2014 1:35 AM

A great little slideshow of all the best free tools: enough said. 

Dico Krommenhoek's curator insight, April 30, 2014 4:59 AM

Prachtig overzicht!

Alfredo Corell's curator insight, May 1, 2014 11:54 AM

A nice and easy review of trending tools for our classrooms

Rescooped by Sharrock from Gavagai
Scoop.it!

The history of philosophy, in superhero comics

The history of philosophy, in superhero comics | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Roof-jumping with Kierkegaard, archaeological adventures with Foucault, wayfinding in the woods with William James, and more.


Via Luca Baptista
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Motivation, Technology and Innovation for learners of the future
Scoop.it!

26 Ways To Facilitate Learning

26 Ways To Facilitate Learning | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

“There are many different instructional design techniques available today, and as such it is can be difficult to determine which one is best for the content you are presenting.”


Via Dean J. Fusto, Tim Viands, Brad Merrick
more...
Brad Merrick's curator insight, April 15, 2014 3:43 AM
Liking the ideas here, particularly the ongoing reference to the individual capacities of the learner, ie thinking, understanding, questioning... Well worth the read and some great key points to use in the classroom setting.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Educational Administration & Leadership
Scoop.it!

9 Steps To Scaffold Learning For Improved Understanding

9 Steps To Scaffold Learning For Improved Understanding | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
9 Steps To Scaffold Learning For Improved Understanding

Via Maria Lopez Alvarado, MBA
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Cognitive Rigor
Scoop.it!

The Trouble With Measuring Understanding

The Trouble With Measuring Understanding | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

...But to pull back and look at the big picture is a bit troubling. There are so many moving parts in learning: assessment design, academic standards, underpinning learning targets for each standard, big ideas, essential questions, instructional strategies — and on and on and on in an endless, dizzying dance.

Why so much “stuff” for what should be a relatively simple relationship between learner and content?

Because it’s so difficult to agree on what understanding is — what it looks like, what learners should be able to say or do to prove that they in fact understand. Wiggins and McTighe go on in the UbD series to ask, “Mindful of our tendency to use the words understand and know interchangeably, what worthy conceptual distinctions should we safeguard in talking about the difference between knowledge and understanding?”2

- See more at: http://xn--www-efa.teachthought.com/learning/trouble-measuring-understanding/#sthash.vF7wt0tt.dpuf


Via John R. Walkup
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Eclectic Technology
Scoop.it!

Framework for Professional Development: SAMR Template & Infographic

Framework for Professional Development: SAMR Template & Infographic | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

"My colleague, Silvana Meneghini, and I have been working on developing a Professional Development framework for embedding technology use and modern learning litercies based on Ruben Puentedura's SAMR model.

The template consists of 4 Focus Areas. Each stage of the SAMR model consists of 4 focus areas in the template, that support vision, planning, and evaluation in activity and task design as well as a professional development framework."


Via Beth Dichter
Sharrock's insight:
Beth Dichter's insight:

If you are considering using the SAMR model to design lesson plans/units you should consider checking out this post. There is a very detailed template that helps you walk through the steps and consider how to best design your lesson/unit. The template is detailed and you may download it as a pdf. An example is included.

Many are turning to the SAMR model as a guide to integrate technology into their curriculum. If this model is new to you search this Scoop.it or type SAMR in your favorite search engine and you will find a wide variety of resources.

more...
Beth Dichter's curator insight, January 28, 2014 9:52 PM

If you are considering using the SAMR model to design lesson plans/units you should consider checking out this post. There is a very detailed template that helps you walk through the steps and consider how to best design your lesson/unit. The template is detailed and you may download it as a pdf. An example is included.

Many are turning to the SAMR model as a guide to integrate technology into their curriculum. If this model is new to you search this Scoop.it or type SAMR in your favorite search engine and you will find a wide variety of resources.

Matthew Jorgensen's curator insight, August 21, 2014 9:18 PM

SAMR model is a great way to show teachers where they should be heading.  It is gradual and each stage has greta benefits.

jorganiser's curator insight, August 27, 2014 12:36 AM

Professional Development framework for embedding technology use and modern learning literacies based on Ruben Puentedura's SAMR model.

Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Nine Strategies to Spark Adult Students’ Intrinsic Motivation

Nine Strategies to Spark Adult Students’ Intrinsic Motivation | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Are you an instructor who struggles to change the mindset of your students? Do you find that the students’ first questions are about grades rather than the content of the course?
Sharrock's insight:

This article offers useful suggestions for trying get students interested in the lessons and topic. I like that it acknowledges how adults are motivated by extrinsic factors and rewards. This is often overlooked, even briefly.

 

The article suggests that these strategies should include trust-building and relationship building in the excerpt: "Beyond acknowledging that basic needs must be met, we must tap into the adult learners’ motivation by addressing their individual potential and helping them to realize the personal satisfaction that can come from achievement. Yes, there are extrinsic factors at play—adult learners pursue education to advance in a career, to earn more money, and to gain some prestige that may come with a higher degree. But, without ignoring these practical issues, if students can also see how their education, even how each individual class they take, can make a difference in how they see themselves and how they can apply their learning, we start to tap into intrinsic motivation."

 

- See more at: http://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/teaching-and-learning/nine-strategies-to-spark-adult-students-intrinsic-motivation/#sthash.Egc7ojye.dpuf

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Are You Not Entertained? How to Build a Dynamic Lecture

Are You Not Entertained? How to Build a Dynamic Lecture | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Mix It Up
Don't be a purist. Use different styles, formats and media when you lecture, like Pecha Kucha, the 60-Second Lecture, or the Punctuated Lecture. Joan Middendor and Alan Kalish collected dozens of "change up" lecture strategies that I refer to several times a semester. And the Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning at Harvard links to dozens of lecture innovations, including Twenty Ways to Make Lectures More Participatory.
Sharrock's insight:

Lecture has its place but it doesn't have to be long and boring. Don't forget TEDx presentations are also lectures. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Three Ways We Can All Become Better Teachers

Three Ways We Can All Become Better Teachers | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

In Building a Better Teacher, Elizabeth Green draws upon years of interviews and research as an education writer and CEO of Chalkbeat to make the case for why teaching is a craft and that it can be taught to anyone.  Her excellent book should be read for a detailed account of the history of teacher education, an international context, and an entertaining narrative.  Here, I have distilled a few core insights from Elizabeth that each of us can use in learning to become a better teacher both inside and outside the classroom.

 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Students Learn to Fail—and Recover—at Calif. School

Students Learn to Fail—and Recover—at Calif. School | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Educators at a Los Angeles-area high school believe teaching students to "fail productively" will equip them for success in the long run.
Sharrock's insight:

How do you track the changes you have made in yourself to promote problem solving behaviors in your students?

"Learning to Fail" is almost a cliche now, but do we really support learners in ways that they actually learn from failure?

In the article, it is shared that "students who were allowed to struggle with new problems on their own first were better at evaluating different variations of the problem and using different methods to solve it, and they showed deeper understanding of the underlying mathematical concepts. In observations of the classes, Mr. Kapur said teachers "consistently underestimated" students' ability to muddle through to answers on their own." Saying platitudes after a student doesn't succeed is not support. There are practices and systems that need to be in place.  What are those practices and systems?

Can teachers really change themselves to become the kinds of supporters students need so that they can learn through failure? What can you do to make those changes? What changes have you made so far? 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

33 Photos That Prove There Is No One Way To Be An American Family

33 Photos That Prove There Is No One Way To Be An American Family | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
The American family looks different than it did 50, or even 10, years ago.

The number of children living with two married parents has steadily decreased since the '80s. A 2012 Pew study found that 2 million dads stay at home with their kids -- a ...
Sharrock's insight:

Before a teacher speaks about "the average family" or some other fiction, take a look through these pictures. maybe, these pics should be looked at each day before heading to work in the morning. Sometimes, we come from homogeneous neighborhoods of one kind or another and forget the world is different outside of these neighborhoods.  

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Game Building Resources

Game Building Resources | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
The best FREE resources of game building for teachers and children: Building games for teaching Teach with Portal - Today, innovative educators are finding ways to incorporate Portal™ and Portal 2 ...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Teacher Engagement for Learning
Scoop.it!

Resources for Using iPads in Grades 9-12

Resources for Using iPads in Grades 9-12 | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Resources by Topic:

Favorite Apps
Best Practices
Engaging Activities




If you’re a high school teacher looking for iPad resources targeting your needs, you’ve come to the right place. Students

Via Grant Montgomery
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Teacher Engagement for Learning
Scoop.it!

27 Ways Teachers Can Facilitate Learning in Today's Classrooms ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

27 Ways Teachers Can Facilitate Learning in Today's Classrooms ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Via Grant Montgomery
more...
Marcelo Triviño's curator insight, April 27, 2014 11:01 AM

What we should do¡¡

Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

What Gets in the Way of Listening

What Gets in the Way of Listening | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

As your role grows in scale and influence, so too must your ability to listen. But listening is one of the toughest skills to master — and requires uncovering deeper barriers within oneself.

Sharrock's insight:

Think about this for training of new teachers and administrators. Teachers are learning leaders so may find these tips particularly helpful.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Extrinsic Vs. Intrinsic Employee Rewards | eHow

Extrinsic Vs. Intrinsic Employee Rewards | eHow | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Extrinsic is something that happens outside of yourself while intrinsic means something that is created within. When these ideas are applied to workplace motivation, extrinsic means outside forces used to encourage better performance. Intrinsic means creating a sense of self-motivation for better performance. Both styles have pros and cons in...
Sharrock's insight:

Many people respond to extrinsic motivation. Strictly speaking, extrinsic motivators and rewards drive culture building, political engagement, parent engagement with schools and school programs, even learning. Stories are driven by the emotions related to being passed over for a promotion, the reading of wills, being chosen Best Man or Brides Maid, and "the paying of dues" towards a coveted status. People will argue that we need intrinsic motivation more than extrinsic motivators and rewards, but they forget potty training their kids, motivating them to dress themselves, the “high five”, the “head nod”, the power of applause, and they forget the times their hard work (even when completed for their own satisfaction) was ignored or attributed to a co-worker and not to them. They forget gift giving on holidays and special events like anniversaries and birthdays. They forget the thrill of looking at ribbons and trophies legitimately earned. Next time a co-worker or supervisor walks by you without saying hello or even acknowledging you, ask yourself about the need for that recognition.
Why do people argue against the use of extrinsic rewards and acknowledgements? Why should these rewards and acknowledgements be delivered systematically?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Common Core in Action: 10 Visual Literacy Strategies

Common Core in Action: 10 Visual Literacy Strategies | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Visual literacy is a staple of 21st century skills, which state that learners must "demonstrate the ability to interpret, recognize, appreciate and understand information presented through visible actions, objects and symbols, natural or man-made." Putting aside the imperative to teach students how to create meaningful images, the ability to read images is reflected in the following standards.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Solving the Innovation Alignment Challenge With an Ecosystem Approach | Office of Innovation and Improvement

Solving the Innovation Alignment Challenge With an Ecosystem Approach | Office of Innovation and Improvement | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

“The lack of innovation in education is not due to a lack of creativity, but the misalignment of student and educator need to the market supply of innovations.” That’s the guiding premise of Innovate NYC Schools, a 2011 i3 Development grantee that is using technology to increase the degree of alignment and making students and teachers integral to the change process. The project is furthering the development and evaluation of the “Education Innovation Ecosystem,” a network of NYC schools, partner districts, solution developers, and investors that is helping to meet the STEM-related learning challenges of middle and high school students.

 
more...
Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, February 7, 2014 1:24 PM

This is written from an economic perspective. Ecosystems are not economies. They are natural and organic, which is kind of what the author is trying to get at. This requires a local grasp of what is to be done.

Rescooped by Sharrock from Positive Behavior Intervention & Supports: Oakland County
Scoop.it!

Video Playlist: 9 Strategies for Effective Classroom Management

Video Playlist: 9 Strategies for Effective Classroom Management | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
This week, our playlist highlights a mix of techniques for fostering classroom management and productive classroom culture.

Via Mary Perfitt-Nelson
more...
Mary Perfitt-Nelson's curator insight, January 25, 2014 12:06 PM

A bevy of resources on effective classroom organiation!