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Tools, tips and practices to share with teachers
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Average Joe - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Average Joe - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

In terms of social class, the average American may be described as either being middle or working class. As social classes lack distinct boundaries the average American may have a status in the area where the lower middle and upper working class overlap.

Today, one can no longer refer to the nuclear family as the average American household, neither can one identify the current plurality of married couples without children as "the average." Recent statistics indeed indicate that there is no average American family arrangement, but that American society is home to a wide and diverse variety of family arrangements. The one thing the data does indicate is that the average Joe most likely does not reside in a nuclear 4-person family.[4][1]
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Statistics is the fastest-growing undergraduate STEM degree

Statistics is the fastest-growing undergraduate STEM degree | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Statistics—the science of learning from data—is the fastest-growing science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) undergraduate degree in the United States over the last four years, an analysis of federal government education data conducted by...
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3 Probability Games To Build The Skill of Chance

3 Probability Games To Build The Skill of Chance | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Currently, our sixth graders are learning about simple and complex probability. Currently, students are working through skill-building problems and investigations with our math coach, but seem to be craving something more. So, in an effort to encourage them to work through problems, we’ve compiled a list of games that they can play as a reward for completing problems.

 
Sharrock's insight:

Check out these 3 great probability games below:

Probability Fair
Players win tickets by answering probability questions based on a spinner with different colors. With these tickets, they can play different fair games to win even more tickets!Probability Pond
Players choose from a variety of types of activities, including describing chances, finding probabilities, and showing probabilities. Games involve choosing, matching or adjusting fireflies of different colors.Ball Picking Machine
Players must determine the probabilities of a certain color of ball being chosen and adjust the probabilities on a line-graph. 
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▶ Is Punishment or Reward More Effective? - YouTube

 

 

The psychologist Daniel Kahneman, winner of the 2002 Nobel prize in economics, pointed out that regression to the mean might explain why rebukes can seem to improve performance, while praise seems to backfire.[8] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regression_toward_the_mean

 

 

I had the most satisfying Eureka experience of my career while attempting to teach flight instructors that praise is more effective than punishment for promoting skill-learning. When I had finished my enthusiastic speech, one of the most seasoned instructors in the audience raised his hand and made his own short speech, which began by conceding that positive reinforcement might be good for the birds, but went on to deny that it was optimal for flight cadets. He said, “On many occasions I have praised flight cadets for clean execution of some aerobatic maneuver, and in general when they try it again, they do worse. On the other hand, I have often screamed at cadets for bad execution, and in general they do better the next time. So please don’t tell us that reinforcement works and punishment does not, because the opposite is the case.” This was a joyous moment, in which I understood an important truth about the world: because we tend to reward others when they do well and punish them when they do badly, and because there is regression to the mean, it is part of the human condition that we are statistically punished for rewarding others and rewarded for punishing them. I immediately arranged a demonstration in which each participant tossed two coins at a target behind his back, without any feedback. We measured the distances from the target and could see that those who had done best the first time had mostly deteriorated on their second try, and vice versa. But I knew that this demonstration would not undo the effects of lifelong exposure to a perverse contingency.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regression_toward_the_mean

Sharrock's insight:

Why do people resist research findings from areas like leadership, education, parenting, and other areas related to psychology and sociology? One reason may result from the confusion between the use and value of controlled experiments and the value of anecdotal evidence. 

 
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Sharrock's curator insight, January 11, 2014 4:49 PM

Why do people resist research findings from areas like leadership, education, parenting, and other areas related to psychology and sociology? One reason may result from the confusion between the use and value of controlled experiments and the value of anecdotal evidence. 

 

Sharrock's curator insight, January 11, 2014 4:50 PM

Why do people resist research findings from areas like leadership, education, parenting, and other areas related to psychology and sociology? One reason may result from the confusion between the use and value of controlled experiments and the value of anecdotal evidence. 

 
Sharrock's curator insight, January 11, 2014 4:51 PM

Why do people resist research findings from areas like leadership, education, parenting, and other areas related to psychology and sociology? One reason may result from the confusion between the use and value of controlled experiments and the value of anecdotal evidence. 

 
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Useful Web Sites for Statistics Teachers

With so many web sites available, it is hard for teachers of statistics to select those that are most useful. The following is a compilation of information by Daren Starnes, a member of the ASA/NCTM Joint Committee on the Curriculum in Statistics and Probability, as well as information prepared by Robin Lock of St. Lawrence University. You may wish to visit these sites and see which are appropriate for your teaching level.

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linked from the American Statistical Association.

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“Statisticians are the modern explorers.” An interview with Professor David J. Hand - Statistics Views

“Statisticians are the modern explorers.” An interview with Professor David J. Hand - Statistics Views | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

You can’t go wrong with a career in statistics. Most statisticians start out with a degree in maths but some of the best I’ve known started off as biochemists or economists or in some other area, and then have retrained as statisticians. Since they have an understanding of a particular problem domain they can have an advantage in analysing data in that area.

But it is important to remember that statistics is not simply a branch of mathematics. You get 13 year old prodigies in mathematics but not in statistics because to be a good statistician you need to understand more than the mathematics. I know many first class mathematicians who simply cannot do statistics.

Sharrock's insight:

from the article: "We need statisticians to cope with the data for medical research, government policies, engineering and there have not been enough. Society would benefit tremendously from statisticians and there is a danger that there aren’t going to be enough."

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Four Common Statistical Misconceptions You Should Avoid

Four Common Statistical Misconceptions You Should Avoid | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Statistics have become a fixture of modern society. We read them in news stories and they're used to determine policies that will affect every aspect of our lives. Unfortunately, many people wildly misinterpret them in fundamental ways.

Via Bill Bentley
Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "Statistics are heavily math-based, but they're used to analyze real-world scenarios and situations. Separated from reality, statistics are of limited value. Reliance on numbers as an unbiased representation of reality is comforting, but without tying it to real-life people and situations, the information borders on worthless."

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Bill Bentley's curator insight, July 27, 2013 12:46 PM

Several good, basic things to know about using simple statistics.  A quote from the article that I like:  "Separated from reality, statistics are of limited value." Bill


Will Morony's curator insight, July 27, 2013 8:43 PM

Great discussion starters.

 

Sharrock's curator insight, January 6, 2014 12:03 PM

excerpt: "Statistics are heavily math-based, but they're used to analyze real-world scenarios and situations. Separated from reality, statistics are of limited value. Reliance on numbers as an unbiased representation of reality is comforting, but without tying it to real-life people and situations, the information borders on worthless."

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Statistics Outgrowing Other STEM Fields

Statistics Outgrowing Other STEM Fields | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
A New Social Science? Statistics Outgrowing Other STEM Fields

 

Statistics—the science of learning from data—is the fastest-growing science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) undergraduate degree in the United States over the last four years, an analysis of federal government education data conducted by the American Statistical Association (ASA) revealed.

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Donald Clark Plan B: When Big Data goes bad: 6 epic fails

Donald Clark Plan B: When Big Data goes bad: 6 epic fails | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Data, in the wrong hands, whether malicious, manipulative or naïve can be downright dangerous. Indeed, when big data goes bad it can be lethal. Unfortunately the learning game is no stranger to both the abuse of data. Here’s six examples showing seven species of ‘bad data’. 
Sharrock's insight:

This excerpt kills me: 

1. Data subtraction: Ken RobinsonDon’t let the selective graphical representation of data, destroy the integrity of the data. A good example of blatant data editing is the memorable ‘ritalin’ image used by Sir Ken Robinson in his TED talk at 3.47. This image is taken from its RSA animation.Compare Robinson’s graph with the true source.His has no legend and he’s recalibrated states to look as if there’s zero prescriptions. To understand this data you have to look at its source to understand that the white areas represent states that did NOT participate in the study or did not have reported prescription data. It’s a distortion, an exaggeration to help make a point that the data doesn’t really supportIn fact, much of what passes for fact in Sir Ken Robinson’s TED talks are not supported by any research or data whatsoever.
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Sesame Street reaches out to 2.7 million American children with an incarcerated parent

Last week, Sesame Street added a new character -- Alex, a child whose father is in prison. The new feature was meant to deal with the reality of a sharp increase in the number of incarcerated adults in the U.S.
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school counselor resource

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EESEE - Contents

EESEE - Contents | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

EESEE is designed to be a resource for educators and an aid for students in the study of statistics. It is intended to serve as a supplement to introductory textbooks written for students with varying degrees of mathematical backgrounds.

EESEE is now written in Authorware and it may be used on either a PC or a MAC. An HTML version of EESEE is currently under development.

EESEE currently includes over 80 "real-world" stories, or examples, about the uses and abuses of statistics and statistical inference, drawn from published and printed media encompassing a wide range of subject-matter areas.

Each story is accompanied by problems, graphics, and, in most cases, data sets portable to various statistical software packages. Some stories are also accompanied by video clips.

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DATING FOR BAYESIANS: Here's How To Use Statistics To Improve Your Love ... - Business Insider

DATING FOR BAYESIANS: Here's How To Use Statistics To Improve Your Love ... - Business Insider | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Business Insider
DATING FOR BAYESIANS: Here's How To Use Statistics To Improve Your Love ...
Business Insider
I am a somewhat socially awkward person. This sometimes makes first dates a daunting proposition.

Via Bill Bentley
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At last, statistics that might interest teenagers!

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Bill Bentley's curator insight, November 6, 2013 8:47 AM

For all you dating folks, regardless of your age, here is one good reason why you need to study statistics!  :-)

Sharrock's comment, January 6, 2014 11:17 AM
At last, statistics that might interest teenagers!
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Why Treating Life Like An Experiment Helps You Make Faster Decisions - Fast Company

Why Treating Life Like An Experiment Helps You Make Faster Decisions - Fast Company | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Why Treating Life Like An Experiment Helps You Make Faster Decisions Fast Company We've talked about this at a macro scale: that it can be useful to think of your career as a course of "grand experiments," in which you can test your strengths and...

Via Bill Bentley
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Bill Bentley's curator insight, August 20, 2013 8:55 AM

Good advice in this article, and not just for people who study experimental design.