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Simulations Reveal How White Lies Glue Society Together And Black Lies Create Diversity | MIT Technology Review

Simulations Reveal How White Lies Glue Society Together And Black Lies Create Diversity | MIT Technology Review | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Evolutionary biologists have long thought that lying ought to destroy societies. Now computational anthropologists have shown that nothing could be further from the truth.
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Iñiguez  reports that the greatest diversity occurs when there is a certain amount of deception. In that case, white lies strengthen ties while black lies weaken them and this tension allows diversity to flourish. “The results of our study suggest that not all lies are bad or necessarily socially destructive; in fact, it seems that some lies may even enhance the cohesion of the society as a whole and help to create links with other people,” say Iñiguez and co.

 
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Don’t Fret About What Social Media is Doing to Relationships | MIT Technology Review

Don’t Fret About What Social Media is Doing to Relationships | MIT Technology Review | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Love and sex in the age of social media and mobile communication.
Sharrock's insight:

Love this question: “What happens after you’ve had a great online flirtatious chat … and then the conversation sucks in person?” 

 

I think about the old days when people didn't have email or the Internet. They depended on the postal services of their day. People wrote letters and it would take days (or weeks?) to receive a letter. Wouldn't it be an interesting school experiment for everybody to write letters to each other and agree not to use electronic means of contact for a given amount of time?

 

You could use this article to discuss the Internet as well. How do you know you are conversing with who you think you're conversing with? Identities online. Spoofing. False identities. borrowed phone leads to texting problems.

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Extrinsic Vs. Intrinsic Employee Rewards | eHow

Extrinsic Vs. Intrinsic Employee Rewards | eHow | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Extrinsic is something that happens outside of yourself while intrinsic means something that is created within. When these ideas are applied to workplace motivation, extrinsic means outside forces used to encourage better performance. Intrinsic means creating a sense of self-motivation for better performance. Both styles have pros and cons in...
Sharrock's insight:

Many people respond to extrinsic motivation. Strictly speaking, extrinsic motivators and rewards drive culture building, political engagement, parent engagement with schools and school programs, even learning. Stories are driven by the emotions related to being passed over for a promotion, the reading of wills, being chosen Best Man or Brides Maid, and "the paying of dues" towards a coveted status. People will argue that we need intrinsic motivation more than extrinsic motivators and rewards, but they forget potty training their kids, motivating them to dress themselves, the “high five”, the “head nod”, the power of applause, and they forget the times their hard work (even when completed for their own satisfaction) was ignored or attributed to a co-worker and not to them. They forget gift giving on holidays and special events like anniversaries and birthdays. They forget the thrill of looking at ribbons and trophies legitimately earned. Next time a co-worker or supervisor walks by you without saying hello or even acknowledging you, ask yourself about the need for that recognition.
Why do people argue against the use of extrinsic rewards and acknowledgements? Why should these rewards and acknowledgements be delivered systematically?

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Anathem - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Anathem is a speculative fiction novel by Neal Stephenson, published in 2008. Major themes include the many-worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics and the philosophical debate between Platonic realism and formalism.

Anathem is set on and around the planet Arbre. Thousands of years prior to the events in the novel, society was on the verge of collapse. Intellectuals entered concents, much like monastic communities but focused on intellectual endeavors rather than religious practice. Here, the avout— intellectuals living under vows and separated from Sæcular society, fraa (derived from Latin frater) for male avout and suur (derived from Latin soror) for female avout — retain extremely limited access to tools and are banned from possessing or operating most advanced technology (at a level beyond paper and pen) and are watched over by the Inquisition, which answers to the outside world (known as the Sæcular Power). The avout are forbidden to communicate with people outside the walls of the concent except during Apert, a 10-day observance held only once every year, decade, century, or millennium, depending on the frequency with which a given group of avout is allowed to interact with the Sæcular world. Concents are therefore slow to change - unlike the rest of Arbre, which goes through many cycles of booms and busts.

Interaction between the avout and the Sæcular world is not, however, limited to Apert. The secular power may "Evoke", or remove from the concent, members of the avout, when needed to address pressing scientific ("theorical") issues facing Sæculars. Such removal is one of many "Auts" (ritual acts) performed on certain occasions – much like rituals or sacraments of the Roman Catholic Church. The act of removing an avout from a concent at the request of the Sæcular Power is called "Voco" (a Latin word meaning "I call": most of the technical words used in Anathem are derivations or puns on Latin words, cf. Lucub – a late-night study session – from the Latin lucubratio), or "evocation", the avout called being "evoked".

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