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Tools, tips and practices to share with teachers
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The Road To Resilience

The Road To Resilience | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Make connections. Good relationships with close family members, friends or others are important. Accepting help and support from those who care about you and will listen to you strengthens resilience. Some people find that being active in civic groups, faith-based organizations, or other local groups provides social support and can help with reclaiming hope. Assisting others in their time of need also can benefit the helper.


Avoid seeing crises as insurmountable problems. You can't change the fact that highly stressful events happen, but you can change how you interpret and respond to these events. Try looking beyond the present to how future circumstances may be a little better. Note any subtle ways in which you might already feel somewhat better as you deal with difficult situations.


Accept that change is a part of living. Certain goals may no longer be attainable as a result of adverse situations. Accepting circumstances that cannot be changed can help you focus on circumstances that you can alter.


Move toward your goals. Develop some realistic goals. Do something regularly — even if it seems like a small accomplishment — that enables you to move toward your goals. Instead of focusing on tasks that seem unachievable, ask yourself, "What's one thing I know I can accomplish today that helps me move in the direction I want to go?"


Take decisive actions. Act on adverse situations as much as you can. Take decisive actions, rather than detaching completely from problems and stresses and wishing they would just go away.


Look for opportunities for self-discovery. People often learn something about themselves and may find that they have grown in some respect as a result of their struggle with loss. Many people who have experienced tragedies and hardship have reported better relationships, greater sense of strength even while feeling vulnerable, increased sense of self-worth, a more developed spirituality and heightened appreciation for life.


Nurture a positive view of yourself. Developing confidence in your ability to solve problems and trusting your instincts helps build resilience.


Keep things in perspective. Even when facing very painful events, try to consider the stressful situation in a broader context and keep a long-term perspective. Avoid blowing the event out of proportion.
Maintain a hopeful outlook. An optimistic outlook enables you to expect that good things will happen in your life. Try visualizing what you want, rather than worrying about what you fear.


Take care of yourself. Pay attention to your own needs and feelings. Engage in activities that you enjoy and find relaxing. Exercise regularly. Taking care of yourself helps to keep your mind and body primed to deal with situations that require resilience.


Additional ways of strengthening resilience may be helpful. For example, some people write about their deepest thoughts and feelings related to trauma or other stressful events in their life. Meditation and spiritual practices help some people build connections and restore hope.

 

The key is to identify ways that are likely to work well for you as part of your own personal strategy for fostering resilience.

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Reforming the Teaching History Then and Now (Part 1)

Reforming the Teaching History Then and Now (Part 1) | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
What Gorton and Limbaugh wanted students to learn was a commemorative version of the past—the familiar “heritage” view–rather than one where students apply historical thinking. Historian Gary Nash and colleagues stated the issue this way:

Should classrooms emphasize the continuing story of America’s struggle to form a ‘more perfect union,’ a narrative that involved a good deal of jostling, elbowing, and bargaining among contending groups? A story that included political tumult, labor strife, racial conflict, and civil war? Or should the curriculum focus on successes, achievements, and ideals, on stories designed to infuse young Americans with patriotism and sentiments of loyalty toward prevailing institutions, traditions, and values?
Sharrock's insight:

This is a powerful blog find after I read about the School As Factory Metaphor article by Larry Cuban that was shared by David Franklin, Ed.D. https://www.linkedin.com/in/davidfranklin. It's part of a series of observations that Larry Cuban is using for a forthcoming book. 


The article itself explores the different philosophies behind the teaching of history. One powerful point was the distinction: "commemorative version of the past—the familiar “heritage” view–rather than one where students apply historical thinking." 


This is something that indicates that there are powerful narratives driving Conservative Thought that is different from the Academic/Progressive Thought that drives some of the subversive Education Reform Thought. 


Those thinkers who are familiar with Duckworth/Bandura's grit and perseverance studies and Carol Dweck's Mindset studies and the promotion of the "open mindset" will take issue with a "curriculum focus on successes, achievements, and ideals, on stories designed to infuse young Americans with patriotism and sentiments of loyalty toward prevailing institutions, traditions, and values". 

 

This kind of curriculum would deny and reject failure and hard work as a factor in success. It also undermines the historical importance of collaboration, communication, problem solving processes, and political processes driving American history and accomplishment. This is a promotion of learning facts rather than encouraging individual thought and inquiry. This "heritage view" of history promotes dogma and the memorizing of dogma. Not to mention, the curriculum promotes a lie.


Secondary School history teachers should offer this article and others from this series to promote discussions in the classroom about the politics of education and learning. It can also explore the meaning of dogma and can explore the importance of "multiple perspectives" to approach truth. 


This article can also help with faculty in schools pursuing reform. Some of the educators may believe in the "heritage view" of history education but may not have understood how destructive it can be for lifelong learning goals. Education impacts attitudes and mindsets of students as well as educators. 

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7. Self-Efficacy and Social Cognitive Theories - PSYCH 484: Work Attitudes and Job Motivation - Confluence

7. Self-Efficacy and Social Cognitive Theories - PSYCH 484: Work Attitudes and Job Motivation - Confluence | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Albert Bandura’s concept of self-efficacy was developed as part of a larger theory, the Social Learning Theory (Ashford & LeCroy, 2010), which has progressed into the Social Cognitive Theory (Levin, Culkin, & Perrotto, 2001). Social Cognitive Theory was presented by Bandura in response to his dissatisfaction with the principles of behaviorism and psychoanalysis.  In these two theories, the role of cognition in motivation and the role of the situation are largely ignored (Bandura, 1977; as cited in Redmond, 2010). "Unidirectional environmental determinism is carried to its extreme in the more radical forms of behaviorism... but humanists and existentialists, who stress the human capacity for conscious judgment and intentional action, contend that individuals determine what they become by their own free choices. Most psychologists find conceptions of human behavior in terms of unidirectional personal determinism as unsatisfying as those espousing unidirectional environmental determinism. To contend that mind creates reality fails to acknowledge that environmental influences partly determine what people attend to, perceive, and think" (Bandura, 1978, p.344-345).  

Nevid (2009) explains that Social Cognitive Theory illustrates the fact that individuals do not simply respond to environmental influences, but rather they actively seek and interpret information. Individuals “function as contributors to their own motivation, behavior, and development within a network of reciprocally interacting influences” (Bandura, 1999, p. 169). Although Social Cognitive Theory covers many topics such as moral judgment and physiological arousal, research that is primarily focused on self-efficacy, or the beliefs regarding one's capabilities of successfully completing tasks or goals (Locke & Latham, 2002). According to Bandura (2005), social cognitive theory takes on an agentic perspective to change, development and adaptation. Bandura describes an agent as someone who intentionally influences one’s functioning and life circumstances; “In this view, people are self organizing, proactive, self-regulating, and self reflecting. They are contributors to their life circumstances not just products of them” (Bandura, 2005, p. 1).  

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How to Build Thick Skin and Stop Being So Sensitive

How to Build Thick Skin and Stop Being So Sensitive | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Check out these important tips for building thick skin in your life - and stop feeling so easily threatened and offended by what people say or do.
Sharrock's insight:

Offers good suggestions for building a "thicker skin."

 

excerpt: "Clearly, there are many benefits to being a HSP. They can often connect with others easily and be more kind and understanding toward everyone, as well as more introspective and creative.

However, sometimes this high sensitivity can also become tiresome, unhealthy, and counterproductive."

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Teaching and Assessing Student Resiliencies

Teaching and Assessing Student Resiliencies | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
In this fourth post in a series about comprehensive student assessment, I’m taking on the subject of resilience and how it is we can both teach and assess students in this area. I’ve been arguing
Sharrock's insight:

Resilience is one of the most important qualities our students need to build and develop. They encompass a lot of skills though. Many are listed in this article. 

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, February 20, 2014 1:16 PM

I will have to think about the assessment part. As long as it is a formative process or assessment as learning, it is probably workable. For marks, I don't think so.

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Mentally Strong People: The 13 Things They Avoid

Mentally Strong People: The 13 Things They Avoid | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Editors' Note: Following the huge popularity of this post, article source Amy Morin has authored a Dec. 3 guest post on exercises to increase mental strength here.
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How Do You Define 'Latino'?

How Do You Define 'Latino'? | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
It’s an exciting time to be a Latino. The community's numbers are growing rapidly.
Sharrock's insight:

This could add to an interesting cultural unit in secondary school social studies classes. Students could better understand differences in latin cultures. I wonder if something similar could be done for Americans who are asians, blacks, and maybe even caucasians. 

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The International Resilience Project: Findings from the Research and the Effectiveness of Interventions

The coalescing views entailed recognizing some traits and characteristics these resilient children had that were different from or not as frequently found in children who were not resilient. The traits were identified by different researchers and practitioners, but there was growing consensus on their identification. The International Resilience Project organized those traits into the following categories: External supports and resources, including trusting relationships; access to health, education, welfare and security services; emotional support outside the family; structure and rules at home; parental encouragement of autonomy; stable school environment; stable home environment; role models; and religious organizations (morality); Internal, personal strengths, including a sense of being lovable; autonomy; appealing temperament; achievement oriented; self-esteem; hope, faith, belief in God, morality, trust; empathy and altruism; and locus of control; Social, interpersonal skills, including creativity; persistence; humor; communication; problem solving; impulse control; seeking trusting relationships; social skills; and intellectual skills.
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How Successful People Handle Toxic People

How Successful People Handle Toxic People | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Toxic people defy logic. Some are blissfully unaware of the negative impact that they have on those around them, and others seem to derive satisfaction from creating chaos and pushing other people’s buttons. Either way, they create unnecessary complexity, strife, and worst of all stress.

 
Sharrock's insight:

There's a lot of good advice in this article. It's excellent for dealing with toxic people, but it is also good for avoiding burnout when in any stressful job position. This is especially good for educators of all kinds.

 

If you were ever looking for emotional skills and social skills, this is a great list of those people need to learn (and to continually practice) in order to maintain healthy resilience: The skills can just as easily replace the word "they" with "resilient people..."

 

They Set Limits (Especially with Complainers)


They Don’t Die in the Fight


They Rise Above


They Stay Aware of Their Emotions


They Establish Boundaries


They Won’t Let Anyone Limit Their Joy


They Don't Focus on Problems—Only Solutions


They Don’t Forget


They Squash Negative Self-Talk


They Get Some Sleep


They Limit Their Caffeine Intake


They Use Their Support System


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Gazette » Dealing with Learned Helplessness

Gazette » Dealing with Learned Helplessness | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Learned helplessness is a process of conditioning where student seek help from others even when they have mastered information. See if this example looks familiar:

 
Sharrock's insight:

Learned Helplessness is the "opposite" of self-efficacy (as described by Bandura) also known as "Grit". These interventions and practices may help to develop grit/self-efficacy for students suffering from "learned helplessness" but may also be useful for developing self-efficacy when performing new jobs or to build expertise using new skills and approaches. It is a struggle to establish the positive aspects of these practices though. A few narratives may be needed to place this approach in a positive context. 

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40 Developmental Assets for Adolescents

40 Developmental Assets for Adolescents | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
40 Developmental Assets for Adolescents

Search Institute has identified the following building blocks of healthy development—known as Developmental Assets—that help young children grow up healthy, caring, and responsible.

This particular list is intended for adolescents (age 12-18). If you'd like to see the lists for other age groups, you can find them on the Developmental Assets Lists page.

For more information on the assets and the research behind them, see the Developmental Assets research page.

Sharrock's insight:

Great organization that did a lot of research in resilience.

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Grit and the Need for Achievement

Grit is best defined as a personality trait with two key components:

1) A passion for long-term goals

2) The powerful motivation to achieve these goals through the necessary work, practice, and time.

 

Recent studies show grit and a healthy need for achievement can have many psychological benefits.
Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "Lack of grit is the reason why incredibly talented people sometimes never reach success. Because no matter how smart or talented you are, you still need to put in the work and have the resilience to overcome obstacles and continue marching forward when things get tough."

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5 Powerful Exercises To Increase Your Mental Strength

5 Powerful Exercises To Increase Your Mental Strength | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Many exercises exist that can help you develop mental strength. But here are five that can get you started.
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CENTRE FOR RESEARCH ON YOUTH AT RISK

CENTRE FOR RESEARCH ON YOUTH AT RISK | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Sharrock's insight:

from the webpage: "While there has been a fair amount of work done on identifying risk factors that, if present, may increase the likelihood of a young person's involvement in crime or other negative behaviour problems, there has also been some work done on the development of programs that build on the enhancement of protective factors which may reduce the effects of exposure to risk factors and thus lower the chances a youth will develop serious anti-social or other behaviour problems or become a victim.."

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