Teacher Tools and Tips
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Tools, tips and practices to share with teachers
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Physics and Green Beer Bottles

Physics and Green Beer Bottles | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
I was confused. Most of these green-bottle beers have a similar taste. But what about clear glass beer? Newcastle doesn’t taste like this? What about Bud Select 55? I am not ashamed to say that I also drink that beer. It is perfect for tailgating at a football game or sitting by the pool. But it doesn’t have that same taste of a green-bottle beer.

Here is my brother’s reply to this question (Eric Allain):

“Certain light sensitive compounds present in hops are the culprit of the skunky aroma which lead to the production of 3-methyl-2-butene-1-thiol (MBT). MBT has an extremely low flavor threshold and is very similar to the compound produced by skunks for defense.

Amber bottles block much of the wavelengths of light (~300-500nm) that lead to this photoxidation but green and clear bottles do not.

Corona IS skunky … this is why they serve it often with a lime to mask the smell. Also, the ‘skunkiness’ has become accepted in Corona as just part of the flavor.

Some of the macrobrew companies (Miller-Coors etc) use a hop extract that has been stabilized so that light will not lead to MBT production. Therefore they can use clear bottles without worry.

Since the MBT is derived from hop components, different beers with different amounts or types of hops may lead to varying levels of light induced MBT.

Boosh!”
Sharrock's insight:
This is an experiment some secondary chemistry teachers might try to reproduce on a weekend or over the summer break. It's also a great reminder that science is fun! What are some ways you might improve the information quality of this experiment? 
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Reproducibility: The risks of the replication drive

Reproducibility: The risks of the replication drive | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
The push to replicate findings could shelve promising research and unfairly damage the reputations of careful, meticulous scientists, says Mina Bissell.
Sharrock's insight:

Reproducibility is bit more complicated: "People trying to repeat others' research often do not have the time, funding or resources to gain the same expertise with the experimental protocol as the original authors, who were perhaps operating under a multi-year federal grant and aiming for a high-profile publication. If a researcher spends six months, say, trying to replicate such work and reports that it is irreproducible, that can deter other scientists from pursuing a promising line of research, jeopardize the original scientists' chances of obtaining funding to continue it themselves, and potentially damage their reputations." 


the author describes some very important points about training and learning to execute experiments. It's mainly about time, funding, and skills. 

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Ana Sanchez's curator insight, April 24, 2014 9:40 AM

Are there risks in replicating others' findings? See the other side of the coin of an ongoing debate in the scientific community.