Teacher Tools and Tips
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Why Students Think They Understand When They Don't

Why Students Think They Understand When They Don't | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Although familiarity and recollection are different, an insidious effect of familiarity is that it can give you the feeling that you know something when you really don't. For example, it has been shown that if some key words of a question are familiar, you are more likely to think that you know the answer to the question. In one experiment demonstrating this effect (Reder, 1987), subjects were exposed to a variety of word pairs (e.g. "golf" and "par") and then asked to complete a short task that required them to think at least for a moment about the words. Next, subjects saw a set of trivia questions, some of which used words that the subjects had just been exposed to in the previous task. Subjects were asked to make a rapid judgment as to whether or not they knew the answer to the question — and then they were to provide the answer.
Sharrock's insight:

The author suggests: "teachers can help students test their own knowledge in ways that provide more accurate assessments of what they really know — which enables students to better judge when they have mastered material and when (and where) more work is required." 


Self-learning or autodidactic pursuits can suffer for a number of reasons. This articles describes one reason. We also need to be aware of rhetorical fallacies and cognitive biases. We need others--sometimes groups of others--who can challenge our fallacious beliefs and biases. As knowledge is valued for how it deals with complex issues, we also need to support our perspectives and premises rigorously and with validity. 

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The Secret of Self-Regulated Learning

The Secret of Self-Regulated Learning | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Self-regulated learning is like your own little secret. It stirs from within you, and is the voice in your head that asks you questions about your learning.

More formally, self-regulated learning is the conscious planning, monitoring, evaluation, and ultimately control of one’s learning in order to maximize it. It’s an ordered process that experts and seasoned learners like us practice automatically. It means being mindful, intentional, reflective, introspective, self-aware, self-controlled, and self-disciplined about learning, and it leads to becoming self-directed.
Sharrock's insight:

from the article:

Self-regulated learning also has meta-emotional and environmental dimensions, which involve asking oneself questions like these:

How motivated am I to do the learning task, and how can I increase my motivation if I need to?If my confidence in my ability to learn this material sags, how can I increase it without becoming overconfident?Am I resisting material that is challenging my preconceptions?How am I reacting to my evaluation of my learning?How can I create the best, most distraction-free physical environment for the task?

Metacognitive questions include these:

What is the best way to go about this task?How well are my learning strategies working? What changes should I make, if any?What am I still having trouble understanding?What can I recall and what should I review?How does this material relate to other things I’ve learned or experienced?
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