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9 Expert-Backed Tips for Beating Burnout

9 Expert-Backed Tips for Beating Burnout | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
How to Recover From Burnout at Work - The Muse: You're exhausted and ready to throw in the towe...
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7. Self-Efficacy and Social Cognitive Theories - PSYCH 484: Work Attitudes and Job Motivation - Confluence

7. Self-Efficacy and Social Cognitive Theories - PSYCH 484: Work Attitudes and Job Motivation - Confluence | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Albert Bandura’s concept of self-efficacy was developed as part of a larger theory, the Social Learning Theory (Ashford & LeCroy, 2010), which has progressed into the Social Cognitive Theory (Levin, Culkin, & Perrotto, 2001). Social Cognitive Theory was presented by Bandura in response to his dissatisfaction with the principles of behaviorism and psychoanalysis.  In these two theories, the role of cognition in motivation and the role of the situation are largely ignored (Bandura, 1977; as cited in Redmond, 2010). "Unidirectional environmental determinism is carried to its extreme in the more radical forms of behaviorism... but humanists and existentialists, who stress the human capacity for conscious judgment and intentional action, contend that individuals determine what they become by their own free choices. Most psychologists find conceptions of human behavior in terms of unidirectional personal determinism as unsatisfying as those espousing unidirectional environmental determinism. To contend that mind creates reality fails to acknowledge that environmental influences partly determine what people attend to, perceive, and think" (Bandura, 1978, p.344-345).  

Nevid (2009) explains that Social Cognitive Theory illustrates the fact that individuals do not simply respond to environmental influences, but rather they actively seek and interpret information. Individuals “function as contributors to their own motivation, behavior, and development within a network of reciprocally interacting influences” (Bandura, 1999, p. 169). Although Social Cognitive Theory covers many topics such as moral judgment and physiological arousal, research that is primarily focused on self-efficacy, or the beliefs regarding one's capabilities of successfully completing tasks or goals (Locke & Latham, 2002). According to Bandura (2005), social cognitive theory takes on an agentic perspective to change, development and adaptation. Bandura describes an agent as someone who intentionally influences one’s functioning and life circumstances; “In this view, people are self organizing, proactive, self-regulating, and self reflecting. They are contributors to their life circumstances not just products of them” (Bandura, 2005, p. 1).  

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Attribution Theory - Simply Psychology

How do we attach meaning to other's behavior, or our own?  This is called attribution theory. For example, is someone angry because they are bad-tempered or because something bad happened?

“Attribution theory deals with how the social perceiver uses information to arrive at causal explanations for events.  It examines what information is gathered and how it is combined to form a causal judgment” (Fiske & Taylor, 1991)

Sharrock's insight:

This theory was explored in Thinking Fast and Slow. Saying it is psychological transference seems to be inaccurate. In the book, it was introduced as the person's ability to attribute actions and intentions, even emotions, to objects. In the study shared, there was a large triangle, a two other smaller shapes. They were animated. children viewing the animation readily interpreted the large triangle as a bully that was bullying a smaller shape and that the other shape came to help defend against the bully. They were only shapes. They didn't even have faces. Kahneman also shared that this attribution did not occur with people with autism. 

 

This tendency to attribute intentions can create problems when dealing with using anecdotes as evidence and may be the cause of disagreements. I'm still reading Kahneman's book, but I do wonder how attribution theory and transferance are related as models.

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The Best Person for the Job is the One Who Loves the Job

The Best Person for the Job is the One Who Loves the Job | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Employing people who are interested in doing a job is a better way to ensure that the right person is hired for the job than depending only on the applicant's vocational interests, says a new study.

Via Sakis Koukouvis
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5 Essential Types of Social Proof (and the Psychology Behind Them)

5 Essential Types of Social Proof (and the Psychology Behind Them) | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

You’re walking along a busy sidewalk, dodging passersby, when a small group of people catches your eye. They’re standing in the middle of the path, heads tilted back in unison, staring at the sky.

 

You look, but you can’t see anything. Still, the crowd stares. You stand with them, searching for the source of their fixation. The crowd grows around you, and soon dozens of people are staring wordlessly into the sky.

 

Believe it or not, this is a real-life study conducted in 1969 by psychologist Stanley Milgram. A small group of people staring silently into an empty sky was influential enough to cause 80% of passersby to copy their actions, without any reason for doing so.

 

The Power of Social Proof

 

This is the power of social proof: our innate psychological tendency to use the wisdom of the crowd to influence our own decisions....


Via Jeff Domansky
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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, March 3, 2:26 AM

Exploring the social media possibilities of social proof.

Marco Favero's curator insight, March 3, 3:44 AM

aggiungi la tua intuizione ...

Teresa Levy's curator insight, March 5, 10:13 AM

this may be the force of a mob

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Grit and the Need for Achievement

Grit is best defined as a personality trait with two key components:

1) A passion for long-term goals

2) The powerful motivation to achieve these goals through the necessary work, practice, and time.

 

Recent studies show grit and a healthy need for achievement can have many psychological benefits.
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excerpt: "Lack of grit is the reason why incredibly talented people sometimes never reach success. Because no matter how smart or talented you are, you still need to put in the work and have the resilience to overcome obstacles and continue marching forward when things get tough."

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The Power of Self-Fulfilling Beliefs And How They Really Work

In psychology, there is a concept known as a self-fulfilling prophecy which describes how certain beliefs can influence our actions in a way that makes those beliefs actually come true.
Sharrock's insight:

This is amazing how the self-fulfilling prophecy can work in two directions in the expectations in yourself and the expectations you have for others. This message never gets old; it's a good reminder. 

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 18, 2013 7:37 PM

The fact William Jame is referenced in this article is important. It was his thinking that led to the psychology around the concept of self-fulfilling prophecy. We need to think differently.

David Hain's curator insight, April 19, 2013 2:42 AM

This is an important reminder, these beliefs are permanently at work with good and bad results.