Teacher Tools and Tips
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Tools, tips and practices to share with teachers
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Deliberate Practice and Performance in Music, Games, Sports, Education, and Professions

Deliberate Practice and Performance in Music, Games, Sports, Education, and Professions | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
More than 20 years ago, researchers proposed that individual differences in performance in such domains as music, sports, and games largely reflect individual differences in amount of deliberate practice, which was defined as engagement in structured activities created specifically to improve performance in a domain. This view is a frequent topic of popular-science writing—but is it supported by empirical evidence? To answer this question, we conducted a meta-analysis covering all major domains in which deliberate practice has been investigated. We found that deliberate practice explained 26% of the variance in performance for games, 21% for music, 18% for sports, 4% for education, and less than 1% for professions. We conclude that deliberate practice is important, but not as important as has been argued.
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How to Read a Poem- Poets.org - Poetry, Poems, Bios & More

How to Read a Poem- Poets.org - Poetry, Poems, Bios & More | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Reproduced in partnership with the Great Books Foundation.

Reading poetry well is part attitude and part technique. Curiosity is a useful attitude, especially when it’s free of preconceived ideas about what poetry is or should be.
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Deliberate Practice

Deliberate Practice | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Deliberate practice is what makes us better at something. Most people think practice is play. By not engaging in deliberate practice they don't get better.
Sharrock's insight:

instructive quotes "Teachers, or coaches, see what you miss and make you aware of where you’re falling short."

 

“You can work on technique all you like, but if you can’t see the effects, two things will happen: You won’t get any better, and you’ll stop caring.”

  

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Your Thoughts Can Release Abilities beyond Normal Limits: Scientific American

Your Thoughts Can Release Abilities beyond Normal Limits: Scientific American | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Better vision, stronger muscles—expectations can have surprising effects, research finds
Sharrock's insight:

from the article: "Expectancies, such as expecting that one’s work will bring about health benefits, are capable of producing physiological outcomes. Learned associations, such as the association between being an Air Force pilot and having good vision, can alter other cognitive processes, such as visual perception. Meanwhile, placebo effects observed in clinical research work via expectancies and learned associations created by fake operations, sham drugs, etc. Such expectancies and learned associations have been shown to change the chemistry and circuitry of the brain. These changes may result in such physiological and cognitive outcomes as less fatigue, less immune system reaction, elevated hormone levels, and less anxiety. The interventions that resulted in better performance in a knowledge test or better vision are placebos outside of the clinical context. However, the chemical and neural mechanisms by which they operate are probably similar."


It's amazing how mindsets impact performance. The impact is at such a level that it can change chemistry and ciruitry of the brain. Need to look at non-neurological changes. I remember reading an article about teen girls in high combat zones started menstruation earlier. I wonder what connections will be found in the new study of epigenetics. 

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Lynnette Van Dyke's curator insight, August 16, 2013 9:40 AM

The power of the mind