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Tools, tips and practices to share with teachers
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3 Ways to Model Academic Discourse for High School Students

3 Ways to Model Academic Discourse for High School Students | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Have students compare/contrast popular journal articles with scholarly articles. Have students list their observations.  Great databases to use for popular journals: Newsela and Proquest.  Great databases for scholarly articles: Jstor and Google Scholar. Students will usually note (among the possibilities): a Works Cited page in scholarly articles (although sources will be cited informally in popular journal articles, students will not see formal citations with bibliography in popular journal ar
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Promoting a Culture of Learning

Promoting a Culture of Learning | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Learning is a culture.

It starts as a culture with the students as human beings needing to understand their environment. And it ends as a culture with students taking what we give them and using it
Sharrock's insight:

How do you balance promotion of valuing intrinsic motivation and rewards against extrinsic motivations, state assessments, and other societal values? This article begins the discussion with that question in the back of my mind.

 

What is a culture of learning?

excerpt: "The short answer is that a culture of learning is a collection of thinking habits, beliefs about self, and collaborative workflows that result in sustained critical learning."

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Visible Thinking Routines: Extend & Deepen Students Understanding

Visible Thinking Routines: Extend & Deepen Students Understanding | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Beth Dichter's insight:

Harvard University has a website on visual thinking that is designed for educators and students. Silvia Tolasano, the author of Langwitches Blog, has taken a number of their routines and created visualizations that would be useful for students, visualizations that you might post on your walls or provide copies of for students to put in their binders. 
There is one twist to a number of these  visualizations...they are specific for blogging. The image above includes two of the visualizations. In the post you will find an additional five routines. You will also find an infographic of all the routines within the post available as an infographic

To go directly to the site at Harvard use this link: http://www.old-pz.gse.harvard.edu/vt/VisibleThinking_html_files/VisibleThinking1.html/. And if you are wondering why you might use visible thinking routines consider this statement from the website on visual thinking (at Harvard): 

"Visible Thinking has a double goal: on the one hand, to cultivate students' thinking skills and dispositions, and, on the other, to deepen content learning."


Via Beth Dichter
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Cindy Riley Klages's curator insight, April 9, 2014 6:38 AM

These routines have classroom merit, too, as we're trying to get students to think.

Julienne Feeney's curator insight, April 9, 2014 7:21 PM

Complements MYP principles and Learner Profiles beautifully...

Kate JohnsonMcGregor's curator insight, April 12, 2014 1:26 PM

This has so much relevance when teaching students questioning and critical thinking skills. Great tool for developing Inquiry based learning strategies. Also, I love an infographic!

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Rebuilding NYC with the Power of the Mind

Rebuilding NYC with the Power of the Mind | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Frigand and Hill worked together after 9/11 gathering information from hundreds of sources including reports, brochures, magazines and the Internet, to create a poster-sized Mind Map of all the parties involved in the restoration of lower Manhattan. The main branches they created were government, civic, infrastructure, properties, victims and memorials. They also identified organizations created after 9/11. When the map was completed, it illustrated everyone involved and their connections in what Hill calls "a brain-friendly manner." People connected with the rebuilding effort were able to visualize the big picture and its details at the same time. 

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