Teacher Tools and Tips
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Teacher Tools and Tips
Tools, tips and practices to share with teachers
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6th Grade Speed Dating Genres

6th Grade Speed Dating Genres | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

We're speed dating this week. Several 6th grade teachers want their students to explore different fiction genres. I decided to make some personal ads (pictured above) for different genres or subgenres. I already had resources lists in Destiny for these genres, so it made it easy. We have eleven tables, which we'll load with books and an ad. Students will have to rotate through at least 4 tables. They'll be discussing genres in class, but I made an exit ticket so I can track which are the most popular (I still have one more book order to place.) If you're interested, here's a link to the ads, and a link to the exit ticket. The ads document has the titles listed separately at the end, to make it easier for my aides to cut them out! :)


Via Mary Reilley Clark, GwynethJones
Sharrock's insight:

From Mary: "Feel free to use or modify!"

 

CLICK on the LINKS in the Scoopit & Make a Copy

in your Google Docs!

 

The exit ticket would also translate well to a Kahoot!

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Sarah Scholl's curator insight, March 29, 2016 3:54 PM

Feel free to use or modify!

Margareta's curator insight, April 1, 2016 9:55 AM

Feel free to use or modify!

Margareta's curator insight, April 1, 2016 9:56 AM

Feel free to use or modify!

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The Common Core Has Not Killed Literature

The Common Core Has Not Killed Literature | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Jaume Escofet/Flickr By now almost every teacher in the country has experienced the Common Core State Standards. We’re teaching and assessing them; we’re advocating for them or pushing against them.
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How to Read a Poem- Poets.org - Poetry, Poems, Bios & More

How to Read a Poem- Poets.org - Poetry, Poems, Bios & More | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Reproduced in partnership with the Great Books Foundation.

Reading poetry well is part attitude and part technique. Curiosity is a useful attitude, especially when it’s free of preconceived ideas about what poetry is or should be.
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Reading dystopias ‹ Reader — WordPress.com

Reading dystopias ‹ Reader — WordPress.com | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Utopia: an imagined society or state of things in which everything is perfect or close to perfect.

Dystopia: an imagined society or state of things in which things are very far from perfect to a frightening extent.

An introduction to the genre of dystopian fiction through reading a classic dystopian novel.

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Digital Tools for Pairing Literary and Informational Texts and Close Reading Skills

Digital Tools for Pairing Literary and Informational Texts and Close Reading Skills | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Final Post in Series Looking at Apps and Tools for the Common Core Literacy Curriculum Reading Strand Dr. Leslie Suter and Dr. Melissa Comer are faculty

Via Lynnette Van Dyke
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Solem-Pfeifer: “Everything Is Illuminated” uses humor, charm mixed with sorrow in masterpiece

Solem-Pfeifer: “Everything Is Illuminated” uses humor, charm mixed with sorrow in masterpiece | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

If you don't know the story of "Everything Is Illuminated," it's as beautiful as it is innovative and touching as it is charming (featuring an overarching tone that's perhaps summed up by a quote from the text: "Humor is the only truthful way to tell a sad story.") The plot of the book exists on several different planes: one that sees "the hero" of the novel (also named Jonathan Safran Foer) journeying to Ukraine to find a woman who may have saved his grandfather from the Nazis, one comprised of letters from Foer's translator, Alexander, to him and one that begins in the year 1791 and continues throughout history describing the past of the Ukrainian city, Trachimbrod.
Foer's prowess functions on two levels and though they might seem like fundamental holdings for a writer, it's rare to find a young author who can marry them so blissfully. The Ukrainian translator, Alexander, one of the most unforgettable characters in recent memory, is an egotistical, defeatist whose skills with the English language resemble those of a child who's memorized the most pretentious words in the dictionary, but has little inkling of how to adapt them from sentence to sentence. The character born from the alternately high and low-minded wordplay is as humorous as he is depressing, boasting of his "premium personhood" and indispensability to the female sex, while quietly admitting both his lies and inadequacies.
In much the same way, Foer manages scenes that appeal to a charming, yet low common denominator of humor in translation error that doubles as a saddening representation of a Ukrainian grandfather's anti-Semitism and personal suffering.


Via Charles Tiayon
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