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Tools, tips and practices to share with teachers
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Keeping The Family Feeling In a Growing Business | Café Quill

Keeping The Family Feeling In a Growing Business | Café Quill | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
As your business expands, you may be concerned about keeping unity. These tips will make sure your business stays a family as it grows.
Sharrock's insight:

This seems to be another way of focusing on "culture building" without dealing with the jargon baggage. Does it work, though? Do staff step up like they did? How big does a company get before this becomes "challenging"?

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Data Discussion

Data Discussion | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

How can teachers capitalize on data about student learning that are generated in their classrooms every day? How can this information best be collected and used to increase student learning? Making data part of instructional planning can be challenging, especially if teachers are not used to thinking about assessment and data as a regular part of the process.

Effective feedback  is a great way for teachers to use collected data in order to improve student learning.

Results from almost any assessment can be of great benefit to students, provided they are used to make instructional adjustments. And — the shorter the amount of time between assessment and adjustment — the more powerful its effect on learning. Just like a diet plan that sits on your desk…until you actually pick it up and DO something with it, it isn’t going to affect much!

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Five Tips for Building Strong Collaborative Learning

Five Tips for Building Strong Collaborative Learning | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Students at The College Preparatory School often collaborate in groups, as in this math class where students work together to solve a set of geometry problems in the classroom (above), and then wor
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13 Ways to Keep Your Debt from Holding You Back

13 Ways to Keep Your Debt from Holding You Back | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Penelope Trunk writes: I have tons of debt after launching four companies. There has never been a launch that didn't mess up my personal finances. Most entrepreneurs have no credit- I am like that as well - so I have

Sharrock's insight:

That's just amazing and horrifying to me. In Thinking, Fast and Slow, Kahneman explores Prospect Theory, the Endowment effect, and loss aversion. However, taking "the plunge" entails more than I thought. But it has to be worth it, right?

 

comments at the end of the article might help shape decisions as well.

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9 Tips on How to Be Honest With Someone Without Being Negative

9 Tips on How to Be Honest With Someone Without Being Negative | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Learn how to be honest about sensitive subjects without sounding too negative.

 

Here are 9 key tips on how to be honest with someone:

Look at the situation from their perspective before you do anything.

 

Ask yourself if this is something that really needs to be said. Are you telling them anything they don’t know or haven’t acknowledged?

 

Choose your words carefully – say it to yourself before you say it out-loud. How does it sound?

 

Don’t insult, blame, exaggerate, or be judgmental. Use a calm and respectful tone while describing the problem.

 

Do it in private. You don’t want the person to feel like they are being pressured by a bunch of people all at once.

 

Always offer a solution. Don’t just state a problem if you don’t have some good advice to go with it.

 

Admit you could be wrong. This is just your opinion, the person doesn’t have to agree with you.

 

Let it go if you notice the person is responding negatively toward it. Don’t persist if they aren’t interested in talking about it.

 

Go back to being a good friend again. Don’t make it awkward.
Sharrock's insight:

This might help students as well as teachers and administrators. Social skills need to be taught, sometimes explicitly. Might be useful for a number of different classrooms and social settings, including the speech therapist's space or office when trying to teach pragmatic language skills to students with ADHD/ADD, on the autism spectrum, or students with lagging skills in the language or social skills.

 

I love it when adults say something devastating and rationalize the disasterous response with "I was just being honest." And by love I mean I really really have no patience with such statements. 

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Why Managers Haven't Embraced Complexity

Why Managers Haven't Embraced Complexity | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Three factors have kept complexity science out of C-suites -- until now.
Sharrock's insight:

"Managers, I think, should now get ready to face the full complexity of their organizations and economic environments and, if not control them, learn how to intervene with deliberate, positive effect. Embracing complexity will not make their jobs easier, but it is a recognition of reality, and an idea whose time has come."

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The Us vs. Them Mentality: How Group Thinking Can Irrationally Divide Us

The Us vs. Them Mentality: How Group Thinking Can Irrationally Divide Us | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Studies show that thinking of ourselves in terms of groups automatically leads to a kind of irrational group favoritism, which ends up dividing society, instead of bringing us together.
Sharrock's insight:

This article is helpful in fighting our tendencies toward thinking in polarities (us/them, this/that, choice #1 vs. choice #2, etc.). We are more complex and complicated than these either/or set ups. And problems are often more complex or complicated than the questions often posed in this way. 

 

The concept photo does something interesting with the colors red and blue. In the United States, there are the Blue States and the Red States, layer that with the angel for blue and the devil for red. It works on two levels.

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John Cleese on the 5 Factors to Make Your Life More Creative

John Cleese on the 5 Factors to Make Your Life More Creative | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
"Creativity is not a talent. It is a way of operating."

Much has been said about how creativity works, its secrets, its origins, and what
Sharrock's insight:

This is a serious talk on creativity and play by John Cleese. from the set-up by Brain Pickings: "

Much has been said about how creativity works, its secrets, its origins, and what we can do to optimize ourselves for it. In this excerpt from his fantastic 1991 lecture, John Cleese offers a recipe for creativity, delivered with his signature blend of cultural insight and comedic genius. Specifically, Cleese outlines “the 5 factors that you can arrange to make your lives more creative”:

 
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12 Strategies for Dealing with Worry

12 Strategies for Dealing with Worry | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Leaders who use worry as the reason to do nothing are losers. But, successful leaders worry. I've come to appreciate and respect the worries of my team. Trust worried leaders; doubt the rest. Lack ...
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24 Charts Of Leadership Styles Around The World

24 Charts Of Leadership Styles Around The World | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
British linguist Richard Lewis charts everything from structured individualism in the U.S. to ringi-sho consensus in Japan.
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Why Companies Fail--and How Their Founders Can Bounce Back — HBS Working Knowledge

Why Companies Fail--and How Their Founders Can Bounce Back — HBS Working Knowledge | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Leading a doomed company can often help a career by providing experience, insight, and contacts that lead to new opportunities, says professor Shikhar Ghosh .
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Gifted children get ignored in school despite huge future contribution ...

Gifted children get ignored in school despite huge future contribution ... | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
The authors of the largest ever study of the profoundly gifted question whether the education system is providing enough support for highly talented young people. The US study, published in the journal Psychological Science, ...

Via Douglas Eby
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iPamba's curator insight, January 12, 2014 9:51 AM

Do children with learning difficulties automatically receive extra help? Experiences often suggest otherwise. And we should be careful to resist any tendency to simplify complex realities into either/or polarities. Learning difficulties may co-exist with giftedness, and giftedness may be concealed behind poverty and other social and emotional roadblocks. Education systems and measures are not neutral. Were we to invest resources into enabling each child to blossom and grow, our future would be less dependent on nurturing the full potential of the relative few who meet the standard criteria and measures for giftedness. 

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Nine Principles for Using Measures of Effective Teaching

The data set, reports, analysis, practical insights and tools that were developed throughout the course of the project has been shared to research and practitioner community as well as policy makers. The easy access to data and practical insights provided through this project are helping to support teachers and students in classrooms today.


Via Nik Peachey, Anna Hu
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, September 30, 2013 12:24 PM

It will be interesting to see if these are picked up on and then how they are implemented.

María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, October 1, 2013 5:02 AM

amazing

Rose Garofano's curator insight, October 16, 2013 8:24 PM

a reflective teacher equals student improvement

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The American Scholar: Solitude and Leadership - William Deresiewicz

The American Scholar: Solitude and Leadership - William Deresiewicz | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
If you want others to follow, learn to be alone with your thoughts
Sharrock's insight:

After reading this speech once, I realize these are the words I would have read to my past self in high school and again during my first days in college, and then again at the end of college at graduation. I would try to read them to my children at their different points in life (in person or as a digital avatar). There are powerful messages in this lecture delivered at West Point. He talks about leadership and what it means to be a leader, but he also explains how leadership and isolation play off of each other. He talks about how true leadership can be lonely and isolating, but also how loneliness and isolation can help you to become a better leader, a better thinker, a better human being. These include the abilities of a true leader: The ability to speak your mind even when you know what you are sharing is not held by the majority of those you are addressing; the ability to think critically, skeptically, and to adjust your perspectives to test and validate (or invalidate) a position, a solution, and even the questions asked of a problem, is valuable and rare. Maybe it's valuable because it's so rare. Or maybe it's so valuable because it isn't often appreciated at the time, like a work of great art or an invention that can't be commercialized. My favorite point was when he said, “So it’s perfectly natural to have doubts, or questions, or even just difficulties. The question is, what do you do with them? Do you suppress them, do you distract yourself from them, do you pretend they don’t exist? Or do you confront them directly, honestly, courageously? If you decide to do so, you will find that the answers to these dilemmas are not to be found on Twitter or Comedy Central or even in The New York Times. They can only be found within—without distractions, without peer pressure, in solitude.”

 

I don't agree that there is no leadership in many areas, many departments. I don't know how the author/speaker has come to those conclusions, considering his experiences and intelligence. Usually, people think they are being profound when they say there are no leaders, no poets, no great artists, etc. It's actually a sign that they lack imagination or real experience leading or creating. It's like saying we need to end poverty or hunger; saying it as if no body is trying to achieve these goals. Meanwhile, there are organizations plugging away, resisting, innovating, reaching, and achieving these goals...but at lower levels, lower numbers, temporarily. But he is not that guy. So, I value his speech and his ultimate points and reasoning and advice, but disagree on some points.

 

But leadership has changed, which is often unappreciated often. The “boss” is becoming ineffective. How do people realize that 21st century learning rejects lecturing and “top down” command structure and the “sage on the stage” but think leaders should still lecture and command from up-high? What is leadership in a world of complexity? Authority has changed. Hierarchies are collapsing, becoming lattices and noded-networks. Power and warfare include informality (informal power) and unorthodoxy (innovative).  Temporary teams focus on short term projects and objectives.

The more informed, intelligent, and experienced commentator should explain how leadership has changed. But that’s not what complainers do. They don’t talk about complexity, complications, and wicked problems. They sound like apologists. They appear weak and confused and bureaucratic. The eyes of the audience will go glassy. But what do we know about leadership from Star Trek? Was Captain Kirk a better leader than Jean Luc Picard? How do you evaluate Mission Impossible of today? I wonder if people still want Clint Eastwood types. In the Game of Thrones, we are introduced to different kinds of leaders and different kinds of heroes. I wonder who is best, most heroic, and more effective at leading.

We say we want better problem solving, and say that this comes from thinking critically, communicating and collaborating. And we know solutions result best from all of this with reflection and more critical thinking. But what about time? How much time is given and how much time must be taken? 

 

The lecturer redeems himself by saying this: “I find for myself that my first thought is never my best thought. My first thought is always someone else’s; it’s always what I’ve already heard about the subject, always the conventional wisdom. It’s only by concentrating, sticking to the question, being patient, letting all the parts of my mind come into play, that I arrive at an original idea. By giving my brain a chance to make associations, draw connections, take me by surprise. And often even that idea doesn’t turn out to be very good. I need time to think about it, too, to make mistakes and recognize them, to make false starts and correct them, to outlast my impulses, to defeat my desire to declare the job done and move on to the next thing.”

 

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, June 14, 2013 9:02 AM

We need quiet time to meditate, contemplate, or pray. It does not make a difference what we call it. We need it.

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, June 18, 2013 8:49 AM

At the heart of servant-leadership is mindfulness which includes being comfortable with the discomfort of solitude.

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The Power of Self-Fulfilling Beliefs And How They Really Work

In psychology, there is a concept known as a self-fulfilling prophecy which describes how certain beliefs can influence our actions in a way that makes those beliefs actually come true.
Sharrock's insight:

This is amazing how the self-fulfilling prophecy can work in two directions in the expectations in yourself and the expectations you have for others. This message never gets old; it's a good reminder. 

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 18, 2013 7:37 PM

The fact William Jame is referenced in this article is important. It was his thinking that led to the psychology around the concept of self-fulfilling prophecy. We need to think differently.

David Hain's curator insight, April 19, 2013 2:42 AM

This is an important reminder, these beliefs are permanently at work with good and bad results.

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Build a Diverse Group of Friends

Build a Diverse Group of Friends | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
To grow as a person, it's important to go beyond our "comfort zone" of people and seek relationships with those who are wildly different from us.
Sharrock's insight:

We educators have difficulties expanding our horizons, networking for real professional growth. Maybe this is true for people, in general. After all, the author indicates what almost all of us believe, that “Every single person we choose to associate with brings out a different side of us. Therefore, the more diverse our group of friends is, the more dynamic and flexible we become as an individual.” But the proof is "in the pudding." We don't do this, really. there is even a name for our behavior: the similarity attraction effect. The author provides excellent instruction, "Be interested in people in general. Everyone has their own stories and peculiarities. When you approach everyone with the intent to get to know them and understand them, you’ll often find that most people are pretty damn awesome in their own way."

 

 

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