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Teacher Tools and Tips
Tools, tips and practices to share with teachers
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Self-Check Behavior Checklist Maker | Intervention Central

Self-Check Behavior Checklist Maker | Intervention Central | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Students who track their own behaviors gain greater control over those behaviors. Self-Check Behavior Checklist Maker is a free application that allows teachers to quickly create checklists that students can use to monitor their behavior in the classroom.  Behavior checklists can be used to help both general-education and special-needs students to manage their behaviors in academically demanding and least-restrictive settings. (For suggestions on how to use behavior checklists, download How To: Improve Classroom Behaviors Using Self-Monitoring Checklists.)
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Extrinsic Vs. Intrinsic Employee Rewards | eHow

Extrinsic Vs. Intrinsic Employee Rewards | eHow | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Extrinsic is something that happens outside of yourself while intrinsic means something that is created within. When these ideas are applied to workplace motivation, extrinsic means outside forces used to encourage better performance. Intrinsic means creating a sense of self-motivation for better performance. Both styles have pros and cons in...
Sharrock's insight:

Many people respond to extrinsic motivation. Strictly speaking, extrinsic motivators and rewards drive culture building, political engagement, parent engagement with schools and school programs, even learning. Stories are driven by the emotions related to being passed over for a promotion, the reading of wills, being chosen Best Man or Brides Maid, and "the paying of dues" towards a coveted status. People will argue that we need intrinsic motivation more than extrinsic motivators and rewards, but they forget potty training their kids, motivating them to dress themselves, the “high five”, the “head nod”, the power of applause, and they forget the times their hard work (even when completed for their own satisfaction) was ignored or attributed to a co-worker and not to them. They forget gift giving on holidays and special events like anniversaries and birthdays. They forget the thrill of looking at ribbons and trophies legitimately earned. Next time a co-worker or supervisor walks by you without saying hello or even acknowledging you, ask yourself about the need for that recognition.
Why do people argue against the use of extrinsic rewards and acknowledgements? Why should these rewards and acknowledgements be delivered systematically?

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