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Don't Believe The Myth Of The Billionaire College Dropout

Don't Believe The Myth Of The Billionaire College Dropout | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Mark Zuckerberg really is the exception.

 

the major take home message is this: Nearly all American billionaires attended at least some college with the vast majority of them graduating from college. So if you want to be a billionaire, this analysis would suggest that to maximize your chances you should not drop out of college.

Unless, of course, 1. you have a Thiel Fellowship, or 2. you are the next Gates, Zuckerberg, or Jobs and the opportunities presented to you are simply too good to resist.

Sharrock's insight:

Something to share with kids who think college is useless...

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Deliberate Practice

Deliberate Practice | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Deliberate practice is what makes us better at something. Most people think practice is play. By not engaging in deliberate practice they don't get better.
Sharrock's insight:

instructive quotes "Teachers, or coaches, see what you miss and make you aware of where you’re falling short."

 

“You can work on technique all you like, but if you can’t see the effects, two things will happen: You won’t get any better, and you’ll stop caring.”

  

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Scientific American Quarterly: Feature Article: Intelligence Considered: Winter 1998

The defining term of intelligence in humans still seems to be the IQ score, even though IQ tests are not given as often as they used to be. The test comes primarily in two forms: the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale and the Wechsler Intelligence Scales (both come in adult and children's versions). Generally costing several hundred dollars, they are usually given only by psychologists, although variations of them populate bookstores and the World Wide Web. (Superhigh scores like vos Savant's are no longer possible, because scoring is now based on a statistical population distribution among age peers, rather than simply dividing the mental age by the chronological age and multiplying by 100.) Other standardized tests, such as the Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT) and the Graduate Record Exam (GRE), capture the main aspects of IQ tests.

 

Sharrock's insight:

Resilience and "grit" are the only common factors that lead to success. How to define "success" though is another matter.

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You think you're so smart. You're too verbal...too sensitive | High Ability

You think you're so smart. You're too verbal...too sensitive | High Ability | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Movies with gifted and talented characters may depict positive reactions to characteristics, but also some not so positive reactions to exceptional people.

Via Douglas Eby
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Legal Intelligence

Legal Intelligence | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
There are a lot of great resources for primary law online, both free and fee. However, to get legal analysis and cutting edge thinking on current legal topics there are also some great resources for free online.

Via Bonnie Hohhof
Sharrock's insight:

We should expose students to these kinds of resources as part of their common core learning pursuits. They do two things: these resources introduce students to laws, making connections between the government and citizenship. The second takewaway from reading these resources is the exposure to critical thinking. People need to learn that laws are interpreted and applied, not simply memorized and followed. Teachers can facilitate the learning of vocabulary, "context", logic, and reasoning. Students might also begin to access their imaginations, exploring how laws might impact their lives. People observe a great deal but don't know how to reflect on those experiences within domains. Psychology and sociology can focus some of that reflection, using vocabulary terms, models, and theory, Occassionally, a gifted teacher might find ways to apply maths. This isn't only about rational thinking. It is also about developing social and emotional intelligence.

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Sharrock's curator insight, October 21, 2013 8:13 AM

We should expose students to these kinds of resources as part of their common core learning pursuits. They do two things: these resources introduce students to laws, making connections between the government and citizenship. The second takewaway from reading these resources is the exposure to critical thinking. People need to learn that laws are interpreted and applied, not simply memorized and followed. Teachers can facilitate the learning of vocabulary, "context", logic, and reasoning. Students might also begin to access their imaginations, exploring how laws might impact their lives. People observe a great deal but don't know how to reflect on those experiences within domains. Psychology and sociology can focus some of that reflection, using vocabulary terms, models, and theory, Occassionally, a gifted teacher might find ways to apply maths. This isn't only about rational thinking. It is also about developing social and emotional intelligence.

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What Are The Habits Of Mind? - Te@chThought

What Are The Habits Of Mind? - Te@chThought | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Habits of Mind are dispositions that are skillfully and mindfully employed by characteristically intelligent, successful people when they are confronted with problems, the solutions to which are not immediately apparent.  When we draw upon these mental resources, the results are more powerful, of higher quality, and of greater significance than if we fail to employ those habits."

 


Via John Evans
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LUZ DEL MAR's curator insight, August 30, 12:56 AM

posibles causas del desinteres el no manejo de habilidades cognitivas

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Do Smartphone Games Keep Kids Sharp or Just Wired? - NBCNews.com

Do Smartphone Games Keep Kids Sharp or Just Wired? - NBCNews.com | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Do Smartphone Games Keep Kids Sharp or Just Wired?
NBCNews.com
Bored kids complaining about how “there's nothing to do” this summer need look no further than their neighborhood app store.
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Theories of Intelligence

Perkins' book contains extensive research-based evidence that education can be considerably improved by more explicit and appropriate teaching for transfer, focusing on higher-order cognitive skills, and the use of project-based learning.

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Video Games Can Help Boost Social, Memory & Cognitive Skills - PsychCentral.com

Video Games Can Help Boost Social, Memory & Cognitive Skills - PsychCentral.com | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
ANINEWS
Video Games Can Help Boost Social, Memory & Cognitive Skills
PsychCentral.com
A new review on the positive effects of playing video games finds that the interaction may boost children's learning, health and social skills.
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Smarter Than Others | High Ability / Gifted Adults

Smarter Than Others | High Ability / Gifted Adults | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
What happens if you realize you are smarter and more capable than most people? Do you celebrate being exceptional, or try to hide?

 

One of the many inspiring quotes by Steve Jobs: "Everything around you that you call life was made up by people that were no smarter than you, and you can change it, you can influence it, you can build your own things that other people can use."

 

But Jobs also recognized he was exceptional. “It was a very big moment that’s burned into my mind. When I realized that I was smarter than my parents..."


Via Douglas Eby, Lynnette Van Dyke
Sharrock's insight:

I stumble across people like this who chose "to hide" often. They are often powerfully motivated, but they are also separate from others. It looks like survivor's guilt, mixed with something else. When I recognize them as a-gifted-in-hiding, I wonder how or if I should share that recognition. Sometimes, I think they want to be "outed" while other times, I'm not sure. There is always that mix of envy and jealousy I feel when I encounter one of them. You do want to ask "what are you doing here?" or "why aren't you out curing cancer?" or "You could have been famous?" But then it occurs to you that the point of hiding is its own answer to those questions. So, why bother asking if the answer is so obvious? 

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Sharrock's curator insight, August 19, 2013 9:54 AM

I stumble across people like this who chose "to hide" often. They are often powerfully motivated, but they are also separate from others. It looks like survivor's guilt, mixed with something else. When I recognize them as a-gifted-in-hiding, I wonder how or if I should share that recognition. Sometimes, I think they want to be "outed" while other times, I'm not sure. There is always that mix of envy and jealousy I feel when I encounter one of them. You do want to ask "what are you doing here?" or "why aren't you out curing cancer?" or "You could have been famous?" But then it occurs to you that the point of hiding is its own answer to those questions. So, why bother asking if the answer is so obvious?