Teacher Tools and Tips
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Teacher Tools and Tips
Tools, tips and practices to share with teachers
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California man sentenced to 15 years for economic espionage

California man sentenced to 15 years for economic espionage | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Chemical engineer also fined $2.8 million for selling China DuPont Co.'s secret recipe for white pigment
Sharrock's insight:

When working on a unit about the uses of espionage in war, liberty, economics, or when exploring what the government "does" (in terms of departments and initiatives), stories like these can interest students in modern day espionage and the challenges to industry.

 

excerpt: "Federal officials say foreign governments' theft of U.S. technology is one of the biggest threats to the country's economy and national security.

"The battle against economic espionage has become one of the FBI's main fronts in its efforts to protect U.S. national security in the 21st century," said David Johnson, the FBI's special agent in charge of the San Francisco office."

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How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses | Wired Business | Wired.com

How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses | Wired Business | Wired.com | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Students in Matamoros, Mexico weren't getting much out of school -- until a radical new teaching method unlocked their potential.
Sharrock's insight:

I wonder how often educators and writers will skip over the use of competition and group work, and how much they might focus on the idea of letting students explore freely without guidance or directions.

 

from the article: "Juárez Correa had mixed feelings about the test. His students had succeeded because he had employed a new teaching method, one better suited to the way children learn. It was a model that emphasized group work, competition, creativity, and a student-led environment. So it was ironic that the kids had distinguished themselves because of a conventional multiple-choice test. “These exams are like limits for the teachers,” he says. “They test what you know, not what you can do, and I am more interested in what my students can do.”

 
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The Roman Empire: in the First Century. The Roman Empire. Life In Roman Times. Family Life | PBS

The Roman Empire: in the First Century. The Roman Empire. Life In Roman Times. Family Life | PBS | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Ancient Rome was a man’s world. In politics, society and the family, men held both the power and the purse-strings – they even decided whether a baby would live or die. 

Families were dominated by men. At the head of Roman family life was the oldest living male, called the "paterfamilias," or "father of the family." He looked after the family's business affairs and property and could perform religious rites on their behalf. 

Absolute power 

The paterfamilias had absolute rule over his household and children. If they angered him, he had the legal right to disown his children, sell them into slavery or even kill them. 

Sharrock's insight:

I've heard this, but didn't believe it. I wonder how ancient Greece compared. Students would probably get a kick out of talking about their rights throughout history. Imagine an inquiry-based learning assignment that looks at their value as children at various times in history...

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We Fact-Checked Snapple's 'Real Facts'

We Fact-Checked Snapple's 'Real Facts' | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Since 2002, the tea maker has been slinging bottle-cap factoids. Some are true, some are outright false, and plenty others are incomplete or ambiguous to the point of absurdity. But it’s easy to pluck out the spurious ones with a search engine and the right kind of bull**** detector.

 

With 30 seconds and a web connection, you can, too.

Sharrock's insight:

This might be fun for secondary schoo students to explore what is passed on as facts. Students can learn first-hand why we can't believe everything we read. This would make a simple but powerful library/research skills activity. Other subjects can exploit this as well. 

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