Teacher Tools and Tips
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Teacher Tools and Tips
Tools, tips and practices to share with teachers
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How to Include Humor (Tastefully) In Your Content | SEJ

How to Include Humor (Tastefully) In Your Content | SEJ | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Adding humor on your content can brighten your readers' day and make them smile. How do you get this reaction without crossing a line?

Via Pantelis Chiotellis
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The Adventures of Fallacy Man - Existential Comics

The Adventures of Fallacy Man - Existential Comics | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Sharrock's insight:

Well, that was fun. 

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Taking Developmental Considerations Into Consideration

Taking Developmental Considerations Into Consideration | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Teachers need to have high expectations of students, but also reasonable expectations of students.
Sharrock's insight:

Another mention of Yardsticks: Children in the Classroom Ages 4-14.

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John Cleese on the 5 Factors to Make Your Life More Creative

John Cleese on the 5 Factors to Make Your Life More Creative | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
"Creativity is not a talent. It is a way of operating."

Much has been said about how creativity works, its secrets, its origins, and what
Sharrock's insight:

This is a serious talk on creativity and play by John Cleese. from the set-up by Brain Pickings: "

Much has been said about how creativity works, its secrets, its origins, and what we can do to optimize ourselves for it. In this excerpt from his fantastic 1991 lecture, John Cleese offers a recipe for creativity, delivered with his signature blend of cultural insight and comedic genius. Specifically, Cleese outlines “the 5 factors that you can arrange to make your lives more creative”:

 
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Imaging study shows how humor activates kids' brain regions

Imaging study shows how humor activates kids' brain regions | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
For the first time, researchers have scanned the brains of children watching funny videos to examine which of their brain regions are active as their sense of humor develops.

Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Using Humor in the Classroom

Using Humor in the Classroom | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Edutopia blogger Maurice Elias explains how laughter can reduce stress and offers a handful of teaching activities to lighten up the learning.

Via Becky Roehrs
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Becky Roehrs's curator insight, March 30, 2015 9:10 PM

Check out the Article comments too, teachers have posted jokes and suggestions, too.

Jan Vandermeer's curator insight, April 1, 2015 7:09 AM

I believe that humour activates new parts of the brain and helps everyone to make unexpected connections, creates agile minds and makes learning fun!

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This Genius Spoof Rebrands Santa For The 21st Century

This Genius Spoof Rebrands Santa For The 21st Century | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Santa is a registered trademark of santaclaus global enterprises incorporated. And don't you forget it.
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Using Humor in Business: Some Practical Advice

Using Humor in Business: Some Practical Advice | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Is business the right place to be funny? Surely business is a serious place and humor doesn’t have a place in it? I disagree, I think humour is greatly underused in business today and can
Sharrock's insight:

Humor is a valuable asset. Colin Shaw makes some good points about humor as a way to become likeable when used appropriately. One thing about humor I think is that it is both smart and creative. You can't be funny about chemistry or physics without a knowledge about chemistry or physics. The same thing about accounting, politics, religion, or any other domain. Comedy is serious though, and can be perceived as a weapon. Colin is right to warn against directing the humor at others. Sometiems, it uncovers truths, explores customs, challenges authority and relationships of "sacred" ideas/concepts to "profane" ideas/concepts. I see some of the funniest comedians challenging the way we see ourselves in ways that are almost painful. They teach us to be more self-aware in a more global framework (how does this look to others? for example). The goal to accomplish such "awareness of self" as criticism might not go over well on a one to one basis or in small, intimate groups. There's something about "the Stage" that allows for such...approaches to hard truths and judgments. We need to be aware that stand-up routines have a different context. Directing humorous critiques at yourself rather than at others is a way to be likeable while also communicating that you have a sharp mind and you know how to use it. 

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5 Ways to Use Humor as Incentive for Homework

5 Ways to Use Humor as Incentive for Homework | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

We may forget that humor may be used as an incentive for homework. Although this post is geared to homework (and therefore parents) much of it is applicable to the teacher in the classroom. With suggestions of different ways to use humor as well as links to a variety of resources available online there is much fun to be had as you explore this post!


Via Beth Dichter
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Solem-Pfeifer: “Everything Is Illuminated” uses humor, charm mixed with sorrow in masterpiece

Solem-Pfeifer: “Everything Is Illuminated” uses humor, charm mixed with sorrow in masterpiece | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

If you don't know the story of "Everything Is Illuminated," it's as beautiful as it is innovative and touching as it is charming (featuring an overarching tone that's perhaps summed up by a quote from the text: "Humor is the only truthful way to tell a sad story.") The plot of the book exists on several different planes: one that sees "the hero" of the novel (also named Jonathan Safran Foer) journeying to Ukraine to find a woman who may have saved his grandfather from the Nazis, one comprised of letters from Foer's translator, Alexander, to him and one that begins in the year 1791 and continues throughout history describing the past of the Ukrainian city, Trachimbrod.
Foer's prowess functions on two levels and though they might seem like fundamental holdings for a writer, it's rare to find a young author who can marry them so blissfully. The Ukrainian translator, Alexander, one of the most unforgettable characters in recent memory, is an egotistical, defeatist whose skills with the English language resemble those of a child who's memorized the most pretentious words in the dictionary, but has little inkling of how to adapt them from sentence to sentence. The character born from the alternately high and low-minded wordplay is as humorous as he is depressing, boasting of his "premium personhood" and indispensability to the female sex, while quietly admitting both his lies and inadequacies.
In much the same way, Foer manages scenes that appeal to a charming, yet low common denominator of humor in translation error that doubles as a saddening representation of a Ukrainian grandfather's anti-Semitism and personal suffering.


Via Charles Tiayon
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