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Teacher Tools and Tips
Tools, tips and practices to share with teachers
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A 1927 Map Reveals the Hide-Outs of Chicago's Most Notorious Gangsters

In the 1920s, the streets of Chicago were home to hundreds of secret clubhouses and hideouts—home bases to thieving, violent gangsters. Between 1923 and 1926, one sociologist at the University of Chicago endeavored to track down and map the favorite haunts and hang-outs of more than 1,300 gangs for the project Chicago’s Gangland.

“No less than 1,313 gangs have been discovered in Chicago and its environs!” Frederic Thrasher wrote at the time. “Their distribution as shown on the accompanying map makes it possible to visualize the typical areas of gangland and to indicate their place in the life and organization of Chicago.”
Sharrock's insight:
might offer novelty to students when teaching about the Prohibition and the Roaring 20s. 
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What did a holiday meal look like 100 years ago?

What did a holiday meal look like 100 years ago? | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
One of the best gifts we can give ourselves and those we love is a great meal. Whether it's the feast of Seven Fishes on Christmas Eve, a more traditional turkey or roast on Christmas Day, or just opting for Chinese takeout, there are many ways to ring in the season that define ou
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Video: How Republican and Democratic voters have changed since 1992

Video: How Republican and Democratic voters have changed since 1992 | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
See the Pew Research Center’s Oct. 2016 report, “The Parties on the Eve of the 2016 Election: Two Coalitions, Moving Further Apart,” for more details.

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Maps of an Alternate North America That Never Became the United States

Maps of an Alternate North America That Never Became the United States | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
"In our history the formation of the United States in her early periods were precarious," Perry tells io9. "Not only were the British poised to retake the South and defeat the insurgents militarily, pre-Constitution the Articles of Confederation created a weak government that couldn't even easily collect taxes. In this world I've created, the AoC are never replaced, and the Union slowly devolves into what you see here."

In this latest project, Penny extends his alt-history speculations beyond the cartographic by "imagining what various items may have looked like from this universe. Things like coins, banknotes, posters, etc. Through this I hope to tell a story of a home very different from our own."
Sharrock's insight:
Social Studies teachers and English Language Teachers and some other subject learning experts could develop a thematic unit around this idea. Using SPRITE (social-political-religious-intellectual-technology-education) for the 11th and 12 graders in the US system, they could explore how different the US could have been. Or this could be a high level elective. The success of this unit would depend on design thinking principles and practices. 
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About Legends of America

About Legends of America | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Traveling through History since 2003

Who We Are

Like so many other small businesses, Legends of America started out as a hobby. Owner-Editor, Kathy Weiser-Alexander, has a deep seated love for history, travel, writing, and almost anything falling within a creative realm. With this in mind, she started a small personal page called High Country Legends. Quickly, the ideas and opportunities expanded to include a partnership with Legends' General Store (formerly the Rocky Mountain General Store), which has been in business since 1998.

Kathy's qualifications include a degree in Business Administration; years of drawing, painting, and other artsy-craftsy stuff; and, when creativity didn't pay the bills --  more than 20 years of hands-on corporate experience, encompassing business and people management, customer service, technology, and consulting.
 
David Alexander, who Kathy met in the same year that this website began in 2003, has contributed advice, technical knowledge, and has been a travel partner from the start. Dave was involved in the radio broadcasting industry from his mid teens. In 1999, Dave left the airwaves to join a company that designed, managed, and supported software for radio stations, which was eventually purchased by Google in 2006. His division was sold off by Google in the fall of 2009, at which time, he joined Legends of America full time.
 
Kathy is a published author, with her first book, Great American Bars and Saloons, published in 2006, followed by major contributions to Greetings from Route 66  in 2010 along with several other noted Route 66 authors. Her work is also published under the "Legends Of America" name with Old West Lawmen (2012), Lynching's, Hanging's & Vigilante Groups (2014), and Frontier Slang, Lingo & Phrases (2015) .  Also in 2014, Kathy was featured in the cable network Investigation Discovery (ID) channel's "Evil Kin", episode 202 about the Bloody Benders, and both Kathy and Dave took part in Ghost Towns: America's Lost World, an over 5 hour, 2 disc DVD released by Mill Creek Entertainment in April of the same year. In 2015, Kathy appeared on the American Heroes Channel in two episodes of the show "Gunslingers" discussing Bat Masterson, original air date August 2, 2015, and Bill Doolin, original air date August 16, 2015.
 
Though we started Legends in the Kansas City area -- Dave -- in Prairie Village, Kansas and Kathy in Lenexa, Kansas,  the business officially moved to Warsaw, Missouri in May, 2010. Warsaw, which sits on the dam splitting Truman Lake and the Lake of the Ozarks, is a small town with about 2,000 full-time folks. That number; however, doubles as people flock to enjoy the lakes in the summer.
 
Now, Kathy is in charge of the writing, photography, and website design, while Dave handles all technical chores, shipping, marketing, & sales. Someone up there was looking over us to make such a great partnership.
 
Legends of America is a small Midwest company with strong moral and ethical business values. We take pride in our work and strive to provide our readers, advertisers, and customers with a continually updated site, great products, and superior customer service. If you ever have any questions or comments, please don't hesitate to contact us.
 
Legends of America
28926 Cedar Hill Loop
Warsaw, Missouri  65355
660-723-2550
Email
 
Contact:
 
Before you call, please be aware that that we are an online-magazine, with more than 4,000 pages on various destinations and topics. We don't own, operate, nor have any further information on our destinations, history, or association beyond what you see on our pages. 
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Reforming the Teaching History Then and Now (Part 1)

Reforming the Teaching History Then and Now (Part 1) | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
What Gorton and Limbaugh wanted students to learn was a commemorative version of the past—the familiar “heritage” view–rather than one where students apply historical thinking. Historian Gary Nash and colleagues stated the issue this way:

Should classrooms emphasize the continuing story of America’s struggle to form a ‘more perfect union,’ a narrative that involved a good deal of jostling, elbowing, and bargaining among contending groups? A story that included political tumult, labor strife, racial conflict, and civil war? Or should the curriculum focus on successes, achievements, and ideals, on stories designed to infuse young Americans with patriotism and sentiments of loyalty toward prevailing institutions, traditions, and values?
Sharrock's insight:

This is a powerful blog find after I read about the School As Factory Metaphor article by Larry Cuban that was shared by David Franklin, Ed.D. https://www.linkedin.com/in/davidfranklin. It's part of a series of observations that Larry Cuban is using for a forthcoming book. 


The article itself explores the different philosophies behind the teaching of history. One powerful point was the distinction: "commemorative version of the past—the familiar “heritage” view–rather than one where students apply historical thinking." 


This is something that indicates that there are powerful narratives driving Conservative Thought that is different from the Academic/Progressive Thought that drives some of the subversive Education Reform Thought. 


Those thinkers who are familiar with Duckworth/Bandura's grit and perseverance studies and Carol Dweck's Mindset studies and the promotion of the "open mindset" will take issue with a "curriculum focus on successes, achievements, and ideals, on stories designed to infuse young Americans with patriotism and sentiments of loyalty toward prevailing institutions, traditions, and values". 

 

This kind of curriculum would deny and reject failure and hard work as a factor in success. It also undermines the historical importance of collaboration, communication, problem solving processes, and political processes driving American history and accomplishment. This is a promotion of learning facts rather than encouraging individual thought and inquiry. This "heritage view" of history promotes dogma and the memorizing of dogma. Not to mention, the curriculum promotes a lie.


Secondary School history teachers should offer this article and others from this series to promote discussions in the classroom about the politics of education and learning. It can also explore the meaning of dogma and can explore the importance of "multiple perspectives" to approach truth. 


This article can also help with faculty in schools pursuing reform. Some of the educators may believe in the "heritage view" of history education but may not have understood how destructive it can be for lifelong learning goals. Education impacts attitudes and mindsets of students as well as educators. 

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Civic Architecture in Islamic History

Civic Architecture in Islamic History | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Major Influences on Trade Architecture in the Islamic World:

Technological: The Replacement of wheeled transportation by camel caravans after the development of camel’s harness and camel’s double-load.
Historical: The milieu in which Islam grew was mercantile, and the Prophet himself, along with most of his companions, was a merchant from Mecca.
Liturgical: Every Muslim is required to perform the Hajj, pilgrimage, at least once in his/her lifetime, if they can. Besides, the development of a science of hadith, prophetic sayings and deeds, necessitated the travel of many scholars in search of authentic traditions. Later, seeking knowledge in famous madrasas, or traveling to learn from a famous shaykh, saw many travelers on the road.
The Requirements:

Rest houses at one-day intervals for the caravans: The Caravanserai
Water cisterns and wells for the caravans.
Road markers and watch towers.
Bridges over rivers and ravines.
 
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Where Have Women Served as Heads of State?

Where Have Women Served as Heads of State? | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
POLITICS As Hillary Clinton begins her campaign for the U.S. presidency, we take a look at where women have served as heads-of-state in the 20th century. (Huffington Post) Map where women have led ...
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Dry Pits, Full Hearts, Can't Lose: Inside the Unsinkable American Deodorants Market

Dry Pits, Full Hearts, Can't Lose: Inside the Unsinkable American Deodorants Market | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

America didn't always have a love affair with dry pits. The first ever trademarked antiperspirant, Everdry, came out in 1903. It worked, but the user experience lacked.From a 1990 New York Times article: "Everdry was cold, sticky, slow to dry, and so stinging and acidic that it ate through clothing." Not surprisingly, it didn't take off.

 

Sharrock's insight:

This could be interesting for a secondary school health class. A history of deodorant, especially for middle school, would be entertaining and informative. 

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How the thrift shop, once widely denounced, became popular in America

How the thrift shop, once widely denounced, became popular in America | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
“As early as the colonial era, writers, politicians, and other vocal critics denounced the sale of used goods,” writes Jennifer Le Zotte in New England Quarterly. Partly, it was born of a vague sense that such goods were sullied or unwholesome, but, writes Le Zotte, some of the opposition can be traced to anti-semitism (in this case, directed at Jewish-owned pawn shops).
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George Will Confirms Nixon's Vietnam Treason

George Will Confirms Nixon's Vietnam Treason | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Richard Nixon was a traitor. The new release of extended versions of Nixon's papers now confirms this long-standing belief, usually dismissed as a "conspiracy theory" by Republican conservatives. Now it has been substantiated by none other than right-wing columnist George Will. Nixon's newly revealed records show for certain that in 1968, as a presidential candidate, he ordered Anna Chennault, his liaison to the South Vietnam government, to persuade them refuse a cease-fire being brokered by President Lyndon Johnson.
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Hollywood vs. history: a lot of this year's hit movies have tackled real-life events. Two New York Times film critics consider how to watch a 'historical' movie. - Free Online Library

Free Online Library: Hollywood vs. history: a lot of this year's hit movies have tackled real-life events. Two New York Times film critics consider how to watch a 'historical' movie.(MEDIA) by "New York Times Upfront"; News, opinion and commentary General interest Motion pictures Methods Movies
Sharrock's insight:

fact checking popular docudramas against history. This could be useful for teachers of literature or social studies.

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Eight unforgettable ways 1968 made history - CNN.com

Eight unforgettable ways 1968 made history - CNN.com | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
1968 was a year of triumphs and tragedies. While America reached new heights by introducing the first 747 and orbiting the moon, all was not well down on Earth. The United States lost a Navy intelligence ship and two proponents of peace -- the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy.
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Charles Boycott was so hated by the community that he is the eponym for the English verb boycott

Charles Boycott was so hated by the community that he is the eponym for the English verb boycott | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

A boycott is an organized, deliberate effort by consumers, workers, or businesses to avoid trade that benefits another group, business, or an entire country. 


Boycott’s duty was to collect the rents from the other 35 tenants and generally look after the estate. At this stage, after twenty years in the county, he considered himself a Mayoman. The problems for Boycott started in the year of 1879 when economic downturn caused a crisis in Irish agriculture and famine was a constant threat.

Sharrock's insight:
This can be a cool anecdote used to introduce boycotts and how they have been used. 
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A Short History of the Awkward Concession Phone Call

A Short History of the Awkward Concession Phone Call | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Concession telegrams had been de rigueur for decades, but Carter added an additional flourish. He gave Reagan an unexpected call. The president-elect had just gotten out of the shower, and he picked up the phone in the bathroom, “with a wrapped towel around me, my hair dripping with water,” to accept Carter’s congratulations. 


 The first such call occurred in 1968.

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Mission | The Pluralism Project

What is Pluralism? 

 The plurality of religious traditions and cultures has come to characterize every part of the world today. But what is pluralism? Here are four points to begin our thinking: 

 First, pluralism is not diversity alone, but the energetic engagement with diversity. Diversity can and has meant the creation of religious ghettoes with little traffic between or among them. Today, religious diversity is a given, but pluralism is not a given; it is an achievement. Mere diversity without real encounter and relationship will yield increasing tensions in our societies. 

Second, pluralism is not just tolerance, but the active seeking of understanding across lines of difference. Tolerance is a necessary public virtue, but it does not require Christians and Muslims, Hindus, Jews, and ardent secularists to know anything about one another. Tolerance is too thin a foundation for a world of religious difference and proximity. It does nothing to remove our ignorance of one another, and leaves in place the stereotype, the half-truth, the fears that underlie old patterns of division and violence. In the world in which we live today, our ignorance of one another will be increasingly costly. 

 Third, pluralism is not relativism, but the encounter of commitments. The new paradigm of pluralism does not require us to leave our identities and our commitments behind, for pluralism is the encounter of commitments. It means holding our deepest differences, even our religious differences, not in isolation, but in relationship to one another. 

Fourth, pluralism is based on dialogue. The language of pluralism is that of dialogue and encounter, give and take, criticism and self-criticism. Dialogue means both speaking and listening, and that process reveals both common understandings and real differences. Dialogue does not mean everyone at the “table” will agree with one another. Pluralism involves the commitment to being at the table — with one’s commitments. —Diana L. Eck, 2006
Sharrock's insight:
US History teachers at the secondary school level, as well as Global Studies and Participation in Government teachers, should explore this site and try to answer the big questions posed in this site. 

Although this site focuses on religious diversity in the United States, it is also about answering the bigger questions about citizenship. It asks who Americans are when they say, "One nation under God"? So often, people make comments in social networks and in face to face conversations about the endangering of Christian beliefs and make claims that the USA is a Christian nation. They dismiss or forget the USA's exceptionalism is linked to its pluralism. For the country to be "great", it must uphold and appreciate this history of inclusion, but must also include the ability to dialogue--not just talk for or talk at others--but to actually dialogue. Diana Eck explains: "Dialogue means both speaking and listening, and that process reveals both common understandings and real differences. Dialogue does not mean everyone at the “table” will agree with one another. Pluralism involves the commitment to being at the table — with one’s commitments." 

I learned about this site from a Great Courses audiobook by Prof. Charles Kimball http://www.thegreatcourses.com/courses/comparative-religion.html. As I listen to the first few discs, it occurs to me that Marshall McLuhan's descriptions of violence and tribalism are manifesting. We have to educate more people with messages from the Pluralism Project to drive back the tide of fear and intolerance. 
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Lynnette Van Dyke's curator insight, March 30, 2016 7:49 PM
US History teachers at the secondary school level, as well as Global Studies and Participation in Government teachers, should explore this site and try to answer the big questions posed in this site. 

Although this site focuses on religious diversity in the United States, it is also about answering the bigger questions about citizenship. It asks who Americans are when they say, "One nation under God"? So often, people make comments in social networks and in face to face conversations about the endangering of Christian beliefs and make claims that the USA is a Christian nation. They dismiss or forget the USA's exceptionalism is linked to its pluralism. For the country to be "great", it must uphold and appreciate this history of inclusion, but must also include the ability to dialogue--not just talk for or talk at others--but to actually dialogue. Diana Eck explains: "Dialogue means both speaking and listening, and that process reveals both common understandings and real differences. Dialogue does not mean everyone at the “table” will agree with one another. Pluralism involves the commitment to being at the table — with one’s commitments." 

I learned about this site from a Great Courses audiobook by Prof. Charles Kimball http://www.thegreatcourses.com/courses/comparative-religion.html. As I listen to the first few discs, it occurs to me that Marshall McLuhan's descriptions of violence and tribalism are manifesting. We have to educate more people with messages from the Pluralism Project to drive back the tide of fear and intolerance. 
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Old West Gunfights

Old West Gunfights | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

There are several misnomers about these "romanticized” gunfights, the first of which is that very rarely, did the gunfighters actually "plan” a gunfight to occur, "calling out” their enemy for dueling action in the street. Instead, most of these many fights took place in the heat of the moment when tempers flared, and more often than not, with the aide of a little bottled courage. They also didn’t occur at a distance of 75 feet, with each gunfighter taking one shot, one falling dead to the ground, and the other standing as a "hero" before a dozen gathered onlookers.

Sharrock's insight:

Similar pages on this website could be useful for history teachers as well as Health teachers. Health teachers can use this information to discuss perceptions of conflict resolution. Kids who think they are participating in an old tradition of gunfighting (or fighting in general) are mistaken. 

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The Best Damn Guide to Men’s T-Shirts on the Internet

The Best Damn Guide to Men’s T-Shirts on the Internet | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

T-shirts get their name from the T-shape formed by their boxy body and attached sleeves. And such T-shaped garments go back centuries; originally made from wool or silk, these sets of underwear often covered the whole body, were designed to absorb perspiration, and served as a barrier between a man’s skin and the more expensive garments he wanted to protect from bodily grime.

Sharrock's insight:

Some articles can surprise you with their information and history research. The t-shirt (aka undershirt) has some interesting connections based on how they were used and worn. 

 

Technology teachers, as well as secondary school teachers of history, can develop an interesting discussion about technology around its intended uses and actual/practical uses. Discussions can plunge deeper by exploring historical context, for example, social customs and practices as they are influenced by GIs returning from the war fronts to live as civilians. Words, attitudes, social interactions, gender politics, and more are influenced by the returnees. 

 

 

 

 

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European Drama in the Middle Ages

After the fall of the Roman Empire, small nomadic bands traveled around performing wherever there was an audience. They consisted of storytellers, jesters, jugglers and many other performers. Later, festivals cropped up where entertainers would show their talents. However, the powerful Catholic Church made headway during the Middle Ages to stamp out such performances and convert the entertainers.

 

Despite its insistence that acting and traveling performances were sinful, the Church was actually instrumental in reviving theatre in the Middle Ages. In one type of church service, called The Hours, Bible stories were dramatized. Music often would be incorporated into the dramatizations. The very first written-down liturgical drama or play is known as the Regularis Concordia by Ethelwold, Bishop of Winchester. The majority of performances were held in monasteries at the beginning of the age. Religious drama was performed exclusively in churches until around 1200 when they were performed outside on occasion.

 

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Studying the American Republic

Studying the American Republic | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
What follows is a list of the works I studied prior to launching my blog in late 2008 (it was then independent, not hosted by WordPress), and prior to posting my white papers on Scribd in late 2009 (a move inspired by the moderator of a blogging community - to which I belonged - who asked me to consider a different platform since my posts were too long, a sin which I still commit.)

You will notice that for the most part, I do not recommend specific chapters or sections. In reading courses at university, professors will undertake such recommendations, either out of consideration for the student’s time, or out of desire to guide the student to the professor’s ideologies.

The former is understandable, the latter contemptible.
Sharrock's insight:

Do historians agree with these texts? Are these texts required reading? What are some other suggested texts to add to E. L. Beck's list? Thoughts?

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What Ancient Wine Tasted Like - YouTube

France is famous for its wine, and for good reason... they've been making wine longer than anyone else! Newly discovered artifacts show it was being made as far back as 425 B.C! So what exactly did this ancient wine taste like? Trace finds out.
Sharrock's insight:

This might be an interesting little tidbit that kids would latch on to. It's almost like time travel. Writers might find this information useful as well.

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The Thanksgiving Story: The Pilgrims Revisited

The Thanksgiving Story: The Pilgrims Revisited | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Explore resources for exploding myths about the Pilgrims, the Indians, the Mayflower and the First Thanksgiving.
Sharrock's insight:

The Thanksgiving Story: The Pilgrims Revisited

The Internet is full of useful materials for exploding myths about the Pilgrims, the Indians, the Mayflower, and the First Thanksgiving. Whether you teach kindergarten or college, you'll find valuable information and teaching tools on the WWW. This week, Education World explores the best of those online resources.


Another excerpt:

"perhaps the most comprehensive source of information about the Mayflower and its passengers can be found at Caleb Johnson's Mayflower Web Pages. Visitors to this site get a fascinating glimpse of Pilgrim life that's sure to surprise, intrigue, and sometimes shock. Here, you can learn about the Mayflower's physical dimensions; see the ship's passenger and crew lists; find out about the lives of the girls and women aboard ship; read accounts of the Pilgrims' voyage, landing, and settlement of Plymouth; and learn the truth about their relationship with the local Indians. The site contains a first-person account of the First Thanksgiving celebration, a photograph of the Mayflower's original passenger list written by William Bradford, versions of the Pilgrim's Peace Treaty with Massasoit, copies of the Pilgrims' wills and estate inventories, and other documents that provide unique insights into the lives of the Pilgrims. Information about Pilgrim food, clothing, weapons, and games is also provided.


"Additional resources at the site include a Message to Teachers, a link to a page of myths about the Pilgrims and the First Thanksgiving that have been taught in classrooms for generations, an area that allows students to email questions to the site's creator, some slightly scandalous accounts of the personal and criminal history of some Mayflower passengers -- and much, much more. In fact, exploring this site is almost as great an adventure as the one it describes."

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Roman toilets were quite stinky, large international study reveals

Roman toilets were quite stinky, large international study reveals | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Yes, the Romans had toilets and sewage. No, they didn't match our idea of a clean bathroom in no way. Their toilets were stinking, disease spreading places, which gave rats and snakes an easy entrance to the house.
Sharrock's insight:

fun stuff to share with teenagers. 

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