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Anathem - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Anathem is a speculative fiction novel by Neal Stephenson, published in 2008. Major themes include the many-worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics and the philosophical debate between Platonic realism and formalism.

Anathem is set on and around the planet Arbre. Thousands of years prior to the events in the novel, society was on the verge of collapse. Intellectuals entered concents, much like monastic communities but focused on intellectual endeavors rather than religious practice. Here, the avout— intellectuals living under vows and separated from Sæcular society, fraa (derived from Latin frater) for male avout and suur (derived from Latin soror) for female avout — retain extremely limited access to tools and are banned from possessing or operating most advanced technology (at a level beyond paper and pen) and are watched over by the Inquisition, which answers to the outside world (known as the Sæcular Power). The avout are forbidden to communicate with people outside the walls of the concent except during Apert, a 10-day observance held only once every year, decade, century, or millennium, depending on the frequency with which a given group of avout is allowed to interact with the Sæcular world. Concents are therefore slow to change - unlike the rest of Arbre, which goes through many cycles of booms and busts.

Interaction between the avout and the Sæcular world is not, however, limited to Apert. The secular power may "Evoke", or remove from the concent, members of the avout, when needed to address pressing scientific ("theorical") issues facing Sæculars. Such removal is one of many "Auts" (ritual acts) performed on certain occasions – much like rituals or sacraments of the Roman Catholic Church. The act of removing an avout from a concent at the request of the Sæcular Power is called "Voco" (a Latin word meaning "I call": most of the technical words used in Anathem are derivations or puns on Latin words, cf. Lucub – a late-night study session – from the Latin lucubratio), or "evocation", the avout called being "evoked".

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Volvo sees crash-free car by 2020

Volvo sees crash-free car by 2020 | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
A promotional video by Volvo details many of the active safety technologies it has developed and is in the process of developing, all with the goal of eliminating accidents. Read this article by Wayne Cunningham on CNET.
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What does this mean? Which auto companies will be adopting some of these features? How might these innovations impact the commercial world?

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A Canticle for Leibowitz - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A Canticle for Leibowitz is a post-apocalyptic science fiction novel by American writer Walter M. Miller, Jr., first published in 1960. Set in a Catholic monastery in the desert of the southwestern United States after a devastating nuclear war, the story spans thousands of years as civilization rebuilds itself. The monks of the fictional Albertian Order of Leibowitz take up the mission of preserving the surviving remnants of man's scientific knowledge until the day the outside world is again ready for it.

A Canticle for Leibowitz is based on three short stories Miller contributed to The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction.[1][2] It is the only novel published by the author during his lifetime. Considered one of the classics of science fiction, it has never been out of print and has seen over 25 reprints and editions. Appealing to mainstream and genre critics and readers alike, it won the 1961 Hugo Award for best science fiction novel.

Inspired by the author's participation in the Allied bombing of the monastery at Monte Cassino during World War II, the novel is considered a masterpiece by literary critics. It has been compared favorably with the works of Evelyn Waugh, Graham Greene, and Walker Percy, and its themes of religion, recurrence, and church versus state have generated a significant body of scholarly research. Miller's follow-up work, Saint Leibowitz and the Wild Horse Woman, was published posthumously in 1997.

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from the webpage: 

" It has been compared favorably with the works of Evelyn Waugh, Graham Greene, andWalker Percy, and its themes of religion, recurrence, and church versus state have generated a significant body of scholarly research."

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Toward Society 3.0: A New Paradigm for 21st century education

The convergence of globalization, the emergence of the knowledge society and accelerating change contribute to what might be best termed a New Paradigm of knowl
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I like the connections made to Toffler's description of the family, learning, and work in the different ages and eras. The hetarchy was something I had been exposed to when reading Michael Maccoby. Some of the statements are kind of empty though. Basically the same as every society era encountered--don't follow, lead. Get rich and be successful hasn't changed either from each era to the next. It's just that communication and sharing of information is faster and we are increasingly more integrated into our machine environments. Systems are starting to learn us just as we are learning our systems. We need to become system thinkers--that's missing from this presentation. 

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