Teacher Tools and Tips
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Teacher Tools and Tips
Tools, tips and practices to share with teachers
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Parenting teens is easy once you embrace being an embarrassment

Parenting teens is easy once you embrace being an embarrassment | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Everyone with teenagers please raise your free hand. And by "free" hand, I mean whichever hand isn't either guarding your wallet or refrigerator door. For parents without a free hand because you ar...
Sharrock's insight:

I liked it so much, I reblogged it.

 

This is something that teachers and school guidance counselors might find useful. Kids are conflicted with the impulse to separate as individuals and clinging to their parents like the children they used to be. They also want to seem serious and knowledgeable, so being cool is a top priority.

 

As a teacher and administrator, I've been very embarrassing (often intentionally and for my own amusement) and have found that when I stopped doing some of my antics, the kids are disappointed. They love it (secretly). They like to complain about it to each other and they laugh but something about it is valued. I suspect it's because it tells them that I love my job and love playing with them (even when I'm telling them something they don't want to hear), but it's also genuine. They know the laugh is real. 

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Students Learn to Fail—and Recover—at Calif. School

Students Learn to Fail—and Recover—at Calif. School | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Educators at a Los Angeles-area high school believe teaching students to "fail productively" will equip them for success in the long run.
Sharrock's insight:

How do you track the changes you have made in yourself to promote problem solving behaviors in your students?

"Learning to Fail" is almost a cliche now, but do we really support learners in ways that they actually learn from failure?

In the article, it is shared that "students who were allowed to struggle with new problems on their own first were better at evaluating different variations of the problem and using different methods to solve it, and they showed deeper understanding of the underlying mathematical concepts. In observations of the classes, Mr. Kapur said teachers "consistently underestimated" students' ability to muddle through to answers on their own." Saying platitudes after a student doesn't succeed is not support. There are practices and systems that need to be in place.  What are those practices and systems?

Can teachers really change themselves to become the kinds of supporters students need so that they can learn through failure? What can you do to make those changes? What changes have you made so far? 

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