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Rescooped by Sharrock from School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
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▶ Is Punishment or Reward More Effective? - YouTube

 

 

The psychologist Daniel Kahneman, winner of the 2002 Nobel prize in economics, pointed out that regression to the mean might explain why rebukes can seem to improve performance, while praise seems to backfire.[8] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regression_toward_the_mean

 

 

I had the most satisfying Eureka experience of my career while attempting to teach flight instructors that praise is more effective than punishment for promoting skill-learning. When I had finished my enthusiastic speech, one of the most seasoned instructors in the audience raised his hand and made his own short speech, which began by conceding that positive reinforcement might be good for the birds, but went on to deny that it was optimal for flight cadets. He said, “On many occasions I have praised flight cadets for clean execution of some aerobatic maneuver, and in general when they try it again, they do worse. On the other hand, I have often screamed at cadets for bad execution, and in general they do better the next time. So please don’t tell us that reinforcement works and punishment does not, because the opposite is the case.” This was a joyous moment, in which I understood an important truth about the world: because we tend to reward others when they do well and punish them when they do badly, and because there is regression to the mean, it is part of the human condition that we are statistically punished for rewarding others and rewarded for punishing them. I immediately arranged a demonstration in which each participant tossed two coins at a target behind his back, without any feedback. We measured the distances from the target and could see that those who had done best the first time had mostly deteriorated on their second try, and vice versa. But I knew that this demonstration would not undo the effects of lifelong exposure to a perverse contingency.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regression_toward_the_mean

Sharrock's insight:

Why do people resist research findings from areas like leadership, education, parenting, and other areas related to psychology and sociology? One reason may result from the confusion between the use and value of controlled experiments and the value of anecdotal evidence. 

 
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Sharrock's curator insight, January 11, 2014 4:49 PM

Why do people resist research findings from areas like leadership, education, parenting, and other areas related to psychology and sociology? One reason may result from the confusion between the use and value of controlled experiments and the value of anecdotal evidence. 

 

Sharrock's curator insight, January 11, 2014 4:50 PM

Why do people resist research findings from areas like leadership, education, parenting, and other areas related to psychology and sociology? One reason may result from the confusion between the use and value of controlled experiments and the value of anecdotal evidence. 

 
Sharrock's curator insight, January 11, 2014 4:51 PM

Why do people resist research findings from areas like leadership, education, parenting, and other areas related to psychology and sociology? One reason may result from the confusion between the use and value of controlled experiments and the value of anecdotal evidence. 

 
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Legal Intelligence

Legal Intelligence | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
There are a lot of great resources for primary law online, both free and fee. However, to get legal analysis and cutting edge thinking on current legal topics there are also some great resources for free online.
Sharrock's insight:

We should expose students to these kinds of resources as part of their common core learning pursuits. They do two things: these resources introduce students to laws, making connections between the government and citizenship. The second takewaway from reading these resources is the exposure to critical thinking. People need to learn that laws are interpreted and applied, not simply memorized and followed. Teachers can facilitate the learning of vocabulary, "context", logic, and reasoning. Students might also begin to access their imaginations, exploring how laws might impact their lives. People observe a great deal but don't know how to reflect on those experiences within domains. Psychology and sociology can focus some of that reflection, using vocabulary terms, models, and theory, Occassionally, a gifted teacher might find ways to apply maths. This isn't only about rational thinking. It is also about developing social and emotional intelligence.

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Sharrock's curator insight, October 21, 2013 8:13 AM

We should expose students to these kinds of resources as part of their common core learning pursuits. They do two things: these resources introduce students to laws, making connections between the government and citizenship. The second takewaway from reading these resources is the exposure to critical thinking. People need to learn that laws are interpreted and applied, not simply memorized and followed. Teachers can facilitate the learning of vocabulary, "context", logic, and reasoning. Students might also begin to access their imaginations, exploring how laws might impact their lives. People observe a great deal but don't know how to reflect on those experiences within domains. Psychology and sociology can focus some of that reflection, using vocabulary terms, models, and theory, Occassionally, a gifted teacher might find ways to apply maths. This isn't only about rational thinking. It is also about developing social and emotional intelligence.