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Rescooped by Sharrock from Common Core State Standards for School Leaders
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Evidence? Read like a detective, write like an investigative reporter

Evidence? Read like a detective, write like an investigative reporter | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

"David Liben, who was involved in the creation of the Common Core and is now Senior Content Specialist at Student Achievement Partners, provides this simple explanation of evidence under the new standards: “It means asking children two questions:

‘What is your evidence?''How did you figure that out?’

 

The point is to ask students to answer not just based on their thoughts or opinions, but on evidence in the text.”


Via Mel Riddile
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Transcript from an interview with Marc Aronson | Reading Rockets

Transcript from an interview with Marc Aronson | Reading Rockets | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

attached is an edited transcript from Reading Rockets' interview with Marc Aronson. The transcript is divided into the following sections:

 Connecting the dots of historyWriting for young peopleCommon Core: A new set of learning standardsEvidence and nuance in nonfiction textTeaching the Common CoreEndorphins for the brainHow parents can encourage nonfiction readingLibrarians know nonfictionHistory is lifeJust the factsCrafting nonfictionFinding great nonfiction
Sharrock's insight:

There's a wealth of information here that can inspire and guide the teacher in explorations of nonfiction and the Common Core.

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Rescooped by Sharrock from School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
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▶ Is Punishment or Reward More Effective? - YouTube

 

 

The psychologist Daniel Kahneman, winner of the 2002 Nobel prize in economics, pointed out that regression to the mean might explain why rebukes can seem to improve performance, while praise seems to backfire.[8] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regression_toward_the_mean

 

 

I had the most satisfying Eureka experience of my career while attempting to teach flight instructors that praise is more effective than punishment for promoting skill-learning. When I had finished my enthusiastic speech, one of the most seasoned instructors in the audience raised his hand and made his own short speech, which began by conceding that positive reinforcement might be good for the birds, but went on to deny that it was optimal for flight cadets. He said, “On many occasions I have praised flight cadets for clean execution of some aerobatic maneuver, and in general when they try it again, they do worse. On the other hand, I have often screamed at cadets for bad execution, and in general they do better the next time. So please don’t tell us that reinforcement works and punishment does not, because the opposite is the case.” This was a joyous moment, in which I understood an important truth about the world: because we tend to reward others when they do well and punish them when they do badly, and because there is regression to the mean, it is part of the human condition that we are statistically punished for rewarding others and rewarded for punishing them. I immediately arranged a demonstration in which each participant tossed two coins at a target behind his back, without any feedback. We measured the distances from the target and could see that those who had done best the first time had mostly deteriorated on their second try, and vice versa. But I knew that this demonstration would not undo the effects of lifelong exposure to a perverse contingency.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regression_toward_the_mean

Sharrock's insight:

Why do people resist research findings from areas like leadership, education, parenting, and other areas related to psychology and sociology? One reason may result from the confusion between the use and value of controlled experiments and the value of anecdotal evidence. 

 
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Sharrock's curator insight, January 11, 1:49 PM

Why do people resist research findings from areas like leadership, education, parenting, and other areas related to psychology and sociology? One reason may result from the confusion between the use and value of controlled experiments and the value of anecdotal evidence. 

 

Sharrock's curator insight, January 11, 1:50 PM

Why do people resist research findings from areas like leadership, education, parenting, and other areas related to psychology and sociology? One reason may result from the confusion between the use and value of controlled experiments and the value of anecdotal evidence. 

 
Sharrock's curator insight, January 11, 1:51 PM

Why do people resist research findings from areas like leadership, education, parenting, and other areas related to psychology and sociology? One reason may result from the confusion between the use and value of controlled experiments and the value of anecdotal evidence.