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Tools, tips and practices to share with teachers
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10 free tools for creating infographics | Creative Bloq

10 free tools for creating infographics | Creative Bloq | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

...The only problem is, infographics that look like they were simple to make are often anything but. Creating something beautiful and instantly understandable in Photoshop is often beyond the limits that time allows. Which is why it's occasionally useful to use a quick and dirty infographics tool to speed up the process.

 

We've selected our favourites here. They're all free, or offer free versions. Let us know which ones you get on best with...


Via Jeff Domansky
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JBass Learning's curator insight, August 21, 2014 6:50 PM

Some really useful looking tools 

Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, August 22, 2014 4:26 AM

I know nothing about this but it looks like a good starting point...:-)))

Luis Cano's curator insight, August 23, 2014 4:02 PM

Herramientas de Infograficas ...

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Data Discussion

Data Discussion | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

How can teachers capitalize on data about student learning that are generated in their classrooms every day? How can this information best be collected and used to increase student learning? Making data part of instructional planning can be challenging, especially if teachers are not used to thinking about assessment and data as a regular part of the process.

Effective feedback  is a great way for teachers to use collected data in order to improve student learning.

Results from almost any assessment can be of great benefit to students, provided they are used to make instructional adjustments. And — the shorter the amount of time between assessment and adjustment — the more powerful its effect on learning. Just like a diet plan that sits on your desk…until you actually pick it up and DO something with it, it isn’t going to affect much!

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Why Teachers of Color Quit

Why Teachers of Color Quit | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Sharrock's insight:

Before this article, I had read one or two articles from teachers who left the Teachers of America program. I wrote of the issues of the authors as an issue of inadequate teacher preparation. This article "Why Teachers of Color Quit" offers another issue professional issue. This is the only article on the subject I have read recently so this may be more of a statistical artifact (unusual situation). I don't want to jump to conclusions. Anecdotal.

 

This quote is important to note: "many teachers seemed indifferent to discussing these issues at all. When Teach for America organized diversity sessions, many teachers in the corps would skip the sessions or come back telling me, “I am so sick of being forced to talk about this.” 

 

I have heard similar comments from fellow studenst in a course on Multiculturalism as part of a teacher prep program. It happened some years ago and the comments were addressed, but it was easy to see that the sentiments did not change from that one discussion. I wonder if other teachers have heard the same or similar. I did not find any problems like this in my teaching positions though. I was lucky enough to teach with supportive teachers and administrators. However, I am surprised teachers in urban areas should encounter these and other difficulties. But this is one story and maybe it is an isolated incident.

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Is Data Porn Good For Anything?

Is Data Porn Good For Anything? | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
So far argues the author it seems not.
Sharrock's insight:

This article may serve "neo-Luddites" well, but it seems a bit short sighted. The arguments of the article hinge on the the belief that nobody can come to conclusions based on the data. For some, of course, this will be the case, but for those who have goals and can reflect on the data, it can't help but have an impact on behavior. For example, food lables have nutritional information. Some people glance at these lables but buy the products despite the grams of fat and sugars indicated, but there are diabetics, physical trainers, nutritionists, and more, who will decide to reject one product over another based on the data on these labels. I'm sure that people with food allergies appreciate inclusion of foods in the ingredients section of the label as well.

Another point: I'm sure, there were many who thought that pictures of cats was the best the Internet had to offer. Now there are computer systems learning to recognize cats, people are creating memes using cats, and there are cat picture collectors making money (or were making money). The World Wide Web, especially through social networking, is generating information based on the data it collects, leading to improved pattern recognition. It never ceases to amaze me how people decide to become early rejectors (as opposed to becoming early adoptors). 

The case against Obamacare lacks awareness that standardizing information acts as an incentive to create businesses around the use of the information. Organizations are already developing services and apps for physicians and patients alike. This takes time. Imagine the next version of "Big Blue" or some other supercomputer developed for "cognitive computing" reads through such data to inform diagnosis, inform the CDC, or some other agency. There is more to data collection than simply informing marketing professionals. Such an argument also seems to ignore the value of infrastructure, like roads. Paving roads is expensive, but what is its value in terms of manufacturing, shipping, transportation, education, commerce, etc.? 

I wonder what research will bear out about data and electronic health records in five to seven years?

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As Data Floods In, Massive Open Online Courses Evolve | MIT Technology Review

As Data Floods In, Massive Open Online Courses Evolve | MIT Technology Review | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
As online education companies track students’ behavior and experiment with different delivery methods, assumptions about effectiveness are being challenged.
Sharrock's insight:

from the article: "Much of the performance research is motivated by a desire to increase course completion rates, which hover around 10 percent, according to most MOOC providers and figures from academics who have taught using the courses."

 

While reading the article, the last thing I expected to learn was that course completion was so low. The second to last thing was that many of the problems were based on issues with computer literacy. 

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Abuse Signs: Could Your Partner Hurt Your Child? - JetMag.com

Abuse Signs: Could Your Partner Hurt Your Child? - JetMag.com | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
With the rash of children being killed by their mother's boyfriends, now is a good time to talk about possible abuse signs.
Sharrock's insight:

For mandated reporters and for selves, family, friends...

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▶ Is Punishment or Reward More Effective? - YouTube

 

 

The psychologist Daniel Kahneman, winner of the 2002 Nobel prize in economics, pointed out that regression to the mean might explain why rebukes can seem to improve performance, while praise seems to backfire.[8] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regression_toward_the_mean

 

 

I had the most satisfying Eureka experience of my career while attempting to teach flight instructors that praise is more effective than punishment for promoting skill-learning. When I had finished my enthusiastic speech, one of the most seasoned instructors in the audience raised his hand and made his own short speech, which began by conceding that positive reinforcement might be good for the birds, but went on to deny that it was optimal for flight cadets. He said, “On many occasions I have praised flight cadets for clean execution of some aerobatic maneuver, and in general when they try it again, they do worse. On the other hand, I have often screamed at cadets for bad execution, and in general they do better the next time. So please don’t tell us that reinforcement works and punishment does not, because the opposite is the case.” This was a joyous moment, in which I understood an important truth about the world: because we tend to reward others when they do well and punish them when they do badly, and because there is regression to the mean, it is part of the human condition that we are statistically punished for rewarding others and rewarded for punishing them. I immediately arranged a demonstration in which each participant tossed two coins at a target behind his back, without any feedback. We measured the distances from the target and could see that those who had done best the first time had mostly deteriorated on their second try, and vice versa. But I knew that this demonstration would not undo the effects of lifelong exposure to a perverse contingency.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regression_toward_the_mean

Sharrock's insight:

Why do people resist research findings from areas like leadership, education, parenting, and other areas related to psychology and sociology? One reason may result from the confusion between the use and value of controlled experiments and the value of anecdotal evidence. 

 
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Sharrock's curator insight, January 11, 2014 4:49 PM

Why do people resist research findings from areas like leadership, education, parenting, and other areas related to psychology and sociology? One reason may result from the confusion between the use and value of controlled experiments and the value of anecdotal evidence. 

 

Sharrock's curator insight, January 11, 2014 4:50 PM

Why do people resist research findings from areas like leadership, education, parenting, and other areas related to psychology and sociology? One reason may result from the confusion between the use and value of controlled experiments and the value of anecdotal evidence. 

 
Sharrock's curator insight, January 11, 2014 4:51 PM

Why do people resist research findings from areas like leadership, education, parenting, and other areas related to psychology and sociology? One reason may result from the confusion between the use and value of controlled experiments and the value of anecdotal evidence. 

 
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About | Open Knowledge Foundation

Opening Knowledge for Everyone

 

The Open Knowledge Foundation (OKF) is a non-profit organisation founded in 2004 and dedicated to promoting open data and open content in all their forms – including government data, publicly funded research and public domain cultural content.

- See more at: http://okfn.org/about/#sthash.t0VpjSDt.dpuf

Sharrock's insight:

Nexum reports in http://www.slaw.ca/2013/10/18/less-serious-legal-research/: ; "In addition to necessary and unnecessary complexity and jargon, there is one more reason why legal documents are boring: they are exclusively textual which is not as fun and self-explanatory as graphics and images. The power of visual communication has long been exploited by other “boring” disciplines. The field of open data often emerges as a naturalplayground for visual applications. Visualization experiments are not recent at all as witnesses this article from 2007. Some readers may even remember data visualization efforts dating back to the nineties."

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In praise of meddling kids | Rationalist Association

In praise of meddling kids | Rationalist Association | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
The intrepid debunking teens – and a dog – make Scooby Doo ideal rationalist TV, says Myra Zepf
Sharrock's insight:

This was an easy but valuable read. I found it entertaining and informative. Can this find its way into a secondary school classroom? I think so. I think it would work as non-fictional reading in any subject. It introduces useful terms as well: double-entendre, rationalism, superstition, per se, and intrepid. It could also help to distinguish betweeen plot and story in that the old Scooby Doo tv series had the same plot repeatedly but the story details changed slightly. A classroom could discuss how many other tv show series were "formulaic." Is this a bad thing or a good thing? This could also lead to questioning if something can be "bad" or "good". After all, a show designed for entertainment achieves its goals when there is an audience. This could lead to questioning and ways to construct an appropriate question? elements of an appropriate question. Open versus closed questions? etc.

 

From the article: "It’s not that Scooby-Doo has another "adult" level that I can suddenly decipher. There are no double-entendres for me to snigger at or references above my children’s heads. What they see and understand is what I see and understand. Only now, as an adult, I have a wider context within which to place it."

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Data Visualizations, Challenges, Community

Data Visualizations, Challenges, Community | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
A community of creative people making sense of complex issues through data and design
Sharrock's insight:

This is a website I came across after reading a comment in a LinkedIn discussion. This point came up that Data Visualization is one area of great importance. 

 

In my readings, I have come across Cleveland, who in one text, was introduced as important reading for learners of Data visualization. http://www.amazon.com/Visualizing-Data-William-S-Cleveland/dp/0963488406 . I borrowed the books from the library but never read them. I keep meaning to try again. Time constraints though. 

Ultimately, it seems that it is all about attention, time to attend, time to reflect, time to make connections, time to find/learn uses and applications of new knowledge and knowledge tools. Data visualization may help cut down on the time needed to evaluate data. More automation might help process data for easier interpretation and faster application/use of data.

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