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Tools, tips and practices to share with teachers
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How To Build An Effective Culture | Digital Tonto

How To Build An Effective Culture | Digital Tonto | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
All too often, culture is mistaken for history.  It is not.  Strong cultures are able to accept and adapt to change.
Sharrock's insight:

These concepts should be used for teacher training as well as school leadership training. Everyone involved in hiring should also consider the research in the power of diversity in networks. We should develop interviewing and appreciation for shared values over shared characteristics.

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Rescooped by Sharrock from Geography Education
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These twins can teach us a lot about racial identity

These twins can teach us a lot about racial identity | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Maria says she's black and Lucy says she's white. Together, they prove none of this makes sense.

Via Seth Dixon
Sharrock's insight:

This is another issue that high school students can research as part of a presentation about race, class, and social identity. This may be useful in Health classes with a link to resilience while other subjects like social studies (and social studies electives) might facilitate appreciation of the USA's obsession with race and ethnicity --contrary to scientific findings that race is more a political construct than a scientific concept. English/writing courses might explore the concept of identity, of "passing" as straight white male/female in literature, folklore, movies, and can elicit creative responses sharing such experiences in poetry, short stories, art works. 

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Carlee Allen's curator insight, May 17, 2015 11:35 AM

A news reporter from the UK congratulates one twin for turning out lighter than her sister, who has black skin. The parents of the twins are mix-gendered, (one of them is black and one of them is white), so one of the twins got her looks from her mom and other one got her looks from her dad.

 

 

I found the video very racist! I don't know what the news reporter was thinking at all! But, I think that it is really cool that they are twins, and are different genders.

Alexa Earl's curator insight, May 24, 2015 12:20 PM

The idea that these 2 girls are related just shows that race shouldn't have anything to do with who we are as people. We learned about equality in many units and I am amazed that something like this has even happened. 

Tori Denney's curator insight, May 26, 2015 8:36 PM

Ethnicity - Ethnicity is a socially defined category of people who identify with each other based on common ancestral, social, cultural or national experience. The girls shown in the pictures came from the same mother, and have the same father, but of course they are fraternal twins. Most people would categorize the red headed girl as white, and the brunette as black or African American, both with completely different backgrounds, and it never crossing their minds that these girls could be related at all. Due to society's categorizing of skin color, people have grown to believe wrong about ethnicity. The color of one's skin has nothing to do with a person's family history or heritage. These twins prove that society is racist when it comes to assuming the ethnicity of a person.

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24 Charts Of Leadership Styles Around The World

24 Charts Of Leadership Styles Around The World | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
British linguist Richard Lewis charts everything from structured individualism in the U.S. to ringi-sho consensus in Japan.
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Using Humor to Break Stereotypes

"A founding member of the Axis of Evil Comedy Tour, standup comic Maz Jobrani riffs on the challenges and conflicts of being Iranian-American -- 'like, part of me thinks I should have a nuclear program; the other part thinks I can't be trusted ...'"


Via Seth Dixon
Sharrock's insight:

A way to explore stereotypes and being American. Teachers can explore these issues to attack immigration, ethnicity, perspective, and more. 

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Jacob Conklin's curator insight, May 6, 2015 4:18 PM

While Maz uses humor to highlight stereotypes that face Iranians and Iranian americans, he still gets his point across. As is human nature, we form prejudices based on often unfair generalizations of a larger group and attach them to individuals. While Americans are very guilty of this, Maz talks about a time when he was in the middle east and was treated differently because his American passport says he was born in Iran. He may be an American citizen, but he was born in Iran, and that is all that it took for a customs agent to stop him and begin asking him questions about his parents and grandparents. People are always too quick to generalize and assume that people who are born in an area are like everyone else in that area. It is a sad reality and unfortunately, due to human nature, will not change. 

Michael Amberg's curator insight, May 26, 2015 10:49 PM

The video is an example as how anything can be used to help break stereotypes all you have to do is try.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 22, 2015 7:49 AM

At its best, humor can break down old stereotypes and foster a greater degree of cultural understanding. That is exactly what Maz Jobrani is trying to accomplish with his humor. There are obvious stereotypes about Muslims that are often far too pervasive in our culture. The most common stereotype  is the lumping of all Muslims into one monolithic group.  All Muslims are not the same. Like Christianity, not all Muslims interpret their holy book in the same exact way. The large majority of Muslims are good people who respect American ideals. Hopefully, Jobranis humor can reach some people who may not understand those facts.

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Keeping The Family Feeling In a Growing Business | Café Quill

Keeping The Family Feeling In a Growing Business | Café Quill | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
As your business expands, you may be concerned about keeping unity. These tips will make sure your business stays a family as it grows.
Sharrock's insight:

This seems to be another way of focusing on "culture building" without dealing with the jargon baggage. Does it work, though? Do staff step up like they did? How big does a company get before this becomes "challenging"?

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