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Teacher Tools and Tips
Tools, tips and practices to share with teachers
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An Outsider's Perspective Can Drive Innovation

An Outsider's Perspective Can Drive Innovation | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
There is immense value in an outsider’s perspective in innovation because they don’t have blinders on. Outsiders can make new connections, and will question the dogma within a certain industries’ walled garden.
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Possibly The Best Math Chart Ever Created - Edudemic

Possibly The Best Math Chart Ever Created - Edudemic | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Math is fun, right? And very applicable to the 'real world', despite what all of those people who say they never use algebra - ever- tell you. But we all know it deep down: math and physics rule our lives.

Via Maureen Greenbaum
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Maureen Greenbaum's curator insight, October 19, 2013 7:04 AM

Next time you’re thinking that the lesson that you need to present to your class doesn’t have a ton of real-life relevance, think again. Even cosines and inverse cosines show up when you’re not looking!

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Sensemaking artifacts « Connectivism

Sensemaking artifacts « Connectivism | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

"Through joint processes of sensemaking and wayfinding – see presentation below – learners begin exploring and negotiating the domain of knowledge. In the process, they produce artifacts, such as the images posted above. Artifacts can include a blog post, an image, a video, a podcast, a live performance – basically anything that allows an individual to express how they’ve come to understand something."


Via Howard Rheingold
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Howard Rheingold's curator insight, August 2, 2013 1:40 PM

As an educator who tries to use social media in conjunction with student-centered, collaborative, inquiry-based pedagogy, I'm interested in collective sensemaking -- which also happens to be an essential non-technological element of collective intelligence. George Siemens, who was one of the creators of the first MOOCs, wrote this insightful piece about the digital artifacts that individuals use in concert with others in the collective sensemaking involved in learning. It applies to collective intelligence as well.

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The strangely familiar browsing habits of 14th-century readers - MIT News Office

The strangely familiar browsing habits of 14th-century readers - MIT News Office | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
MIT professor’s book digs into the eclectic, textually linked reading choices of people in medieval London.

 

Consider Andrew Horn, the chamberlain for the city of London in the 1320s — meaning he was essentially the lawyer representing London’s interests in court against the king, who was Edward II for most of that time. The bound manuscripts in Horn’s possession, handed down to the city and preserved today, reveal a rich mixture of shorter texts: legal treatises, French-language poetry, descriptions of London and more. 

Sharrock's insight:

I was led to believe that our brains were changed by electronics, and that our "short attention spans" was a result as well of browsing. Now, it seems, that people with access to information, to wide ranges of texts, maintained "eclectic reading habits" as well. Intead, maybe it's about intelligence, connectivity (analog social networking), and an interest in being valuable to various social groups in other words, for being interesting (yes, I'm reaching). 

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Has Google Destroyed Your Memory? No. It’s Much Weirder Than That.

Has Google Destroyed Your Memory? No. It’s Much Weirder Than That. | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
The following is excerpted from Clive Thompson’s book Smarter Than You Think: How Technology Is Changing Our Minds for the Better, out now from the Penguin Press. Is the Internet ruining our ability to remember facts?

Via Anna Hu
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from the article: "We don't remember in isolation—and that's a good thing. "Quite simply, we seem to record as much outside our minds as within them," as Wegner has written. "Couples who are able to remember things transactively offer their constituent individuals storage for and access to a far wider array of information than they would otherwise command." These are, as Wegner describes it in a lovely phrase, "the thinking processes of the intimate dyad.""

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Anna Hu 's curator insight, October 7, 2013 8:31 PM

Interesting read.

Sharrock's curator insight, October 15, 2013 10:54 AM

from the article: "We don't remember in isolation—and that's a good thing. "Quite simply, we seem to record as much outside our minds as within them," as Wegner has written. "Couples who are able to remember things transactively offer their constituent individuals storage for and access to a far wider array of information than they would otherwise command." These are, as Wegner describes it in a lovely phrase, "the thinking processes of the intimate dyad."