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Teacher Tools and Tips
Tools, tips and practices to share with teachers
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How to Look Smarter

How to Look Smarter | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Many of the things people do to project intelligence to others can backfire, research shows.
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You Just Had A Fight With A Coworker and Now What? - Fast Company

You Just Had A Fight With A Coworker and Now What? - Fast Company | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Fast Company
You Just Had A Fight With A Coworker&&Now What?
Fast Company
However, the beliefs you connect to that experience need to include your new understanding, what you just learned from your coworker.

Via Eileen Easterly
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Eileen Easterly's curator insight, August 14, 2014 8:35 AM

Great tips for the all important next step after a break in communications, and how best to approach it.

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6-Year-Olds Know When You're Making Sins of Omission

6-Year-Olds Know When You're Making Sins of Omission | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
In a new study, kids gave lower ratings to teachers who left out key details about toys. And once misled, they inspected new toys more carefully.
Sharrock's insight:

Ryan Jacobs says, "Bottom-line: Explain the full-fledged functionality of Super Soakers to your kids or risk losing their trust forever."


 

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Five Tips for Building Strong Collaborative Learning

Five Tips for Building Strong Collaborative Learning | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Students at The College Preparatory School often collaborate in groups, as in this math class where students work together to solve a set of geometry problems in the classroom (above), and then wor
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Effective Ways to Structure Discussion

Effective Ways to Structure Discussion | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
The use of online discussion in both blended and fully online courses has made clear that those exchanges are more productive if they are structured, if there’s a protocol that guides the interaction. This kind of structure is more important in the online environment because those discussions are usually asynchronous and minus all the nonverbal cues that facilitate face-to-face exchanges. But I’m wondering if more structure might benefit our in-class discussions as well.

Students struggle with academic discourse. They have conversations (or is it chats?) with each other, but not discussions like those we aspire to have in our courses. And although students understand there’s a difference between the two, they don’t always know exactly how they’re supposed to talk about academic content when discussing it with teachers and classmates. Would providing more structure provide that clarity and make the value of discussions more obvious to students?

 

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Best Pieces of Parenting Advice

Best Pieces of Parenting Advice | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Here are my 10 best pieces of parenting advice. Trust your gut. Always. Your gut is trying to talk to you. Listen to it. This is one thing I've learned a little late in the game, and I regret that.
Sharrock's insight:

inevitably, a parent of a student in your classroom is going to ask you for parenting advice. Maybe you should hand this out. Keep many at the ready....or is this a bad idea.

 

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A Simple Guide On How To Present Effectively in Public: Speaking.io

A Simple Guide On How To Present Effectively in Public: Speaking.io | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Via Robin Good
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Robin Good's curator insight, April 29, 2014 7:21 AM



Speaking.io is a free web guide to how to present effectively in public curated by @Zach Holman, a subject matter expert, having spoken at a large number of conferences.


The Guide is elegantly organized in multiple sections, each containing a small set of more specific information chapters, and  all accessible from the home page index. 



Good resource for novice public speakers and presenters, as well as another great example of content curation at work. In this case the author has curated his know-how, notes and previous writings into one cohesive and well present gallery.


Helpful. Well designed. 8/10



Check it out now: http://speaking.io/ 


Follow Speaking.io on Twitter


via [url=/u/128177 x-already-notified=1]Ana Cristina Pratas[/url]




Ana Sanchez's curator insight, April 29, 2014 4:51 PM

A very nice summary of all the points you need to think about when preparing a conference presentation. "Because “imagine everyone's naked” is terrible advice."

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9 Tips on How to Be Honest With Someone Without Being Negative

9 Tips on How to Be Honest With Someone Without Being Negative | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Learn how to be honest about sensitive subjects without sounding too negative.

 

Here are 9 key tips on how to be honest with someone:

Look at the situation from their perspective before you do anything.

 

Ask yourself if this is something that really needs to be said. Are you telling them anything they don’t know or haven’t acknowledged?

 

Choose your words carefully – say it to yourself before you say it out-loud. How does it sound?

 

Don’t insult, blame, exaggerate, or be judgmental. Use a calm and respectful tone while describing the problem.

 

Do it in private. You don’t want the person to feel like they are being pressured by a bunch of people all at once.

 

Always offer a solution. Don’t just state a problem if you don’t have some good advice to go with it.

 

Admit you could be wrong. This is just your opinion, the person doesn’t have to agree with you.

 

Let it go if you notice the person is responding negatively toward it. Don’t persist if they aren’t interested in talking about it.

 

Go back to being a good friend again. Don’t make it awkward.
Sharrock's insight:

This might help students as well as teachers and administrators. Social skills need to be taught, sometimes explicitly. Might be useful for a number of different classrooms and social settings, including the speech therapist's space or office when trying to teach pragmatic language skills to students with ADHD/ADD, on the autism spectrum, or students with lagging skills in the language or social skills.

 

I love it when adults say something devastating and rationalize the disasterous response with "I was just being honest." And by love I mean I really really have no patience with such statements. 

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