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Tools, tips and practices to share with teachers
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What is Otherness?

What is Otherness? | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
George Herbert Mead’s classic text, Mind Self and Society, established that social identities are created through our ongoing social interaction with other people and our subsequent self-reflection about who we think we are according to these social exchanges. Mead’s work shows that identities are produced through agreement, disagreement, and negotiation with other people. We adjust our behaviour and our self-image based upon our interactions and our self-reflection about these interactions (this is also known as the looking glass self).
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 1, 2016 12:18 PM
When we perceive someone as a stranger, we "other" them. Although the post is sociological in nature, philosophers (Derrida, Levinas, Butler, etc.) took up the topic.
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Douglas Walton - Google Scholar Citations

Douglas Walton - Google Scholar Citations | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

At Wikipedia--https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doug_Walton


Douglas Neil Walton (PhD University of Toronto, 1972) is a Canadian academic and author, well known for his many widely published books and papers on argumentation, logical fallacies and informal logic. He is presently Distinguished Research Fellow of theCentre for Research in Reasoning, Argumentation and Rhetoric (CRRAR) at the University of Windsor, Canada, and before that (2008-2014), he held the Assumption Chair of Argumentation Studies at the University of Windsor. Walton’s work has been used to better prepare legal arguments and to help develop artificial intelligence. His books have been translated worldwide, and he attracts students from many countries to study with him. A special issue of the journal Informal Logic surveyed Walton’s contributions to informal logic and argumentation theory up to 2006 (Informal Logic, 27(3), 2007). A festschrift honoring his contributions, Dialectics, Dialogue and Argumentation: An Examination of Douglas Walton’s Theories of Reasoning and Argument, ed. C. Reed and C. W. Tindale, London: College Publications, 2010, shows how his theories are increasingly finding applications in computer science. A list of titles of many of Walton’s books is given below. Links to preprints of many of his published papers can be found on the websitewww.dougwalton.ca. [1]

Walton’s work represents a distinctive approach built around a set of practical methods to help a user identify, analyze and evaluate arguments in specialized areas such as law and science, as well as arguments of the kind used in everyday conversational discourse. Walton has called this approach logical argumentation, and as a method it has twelve defining characteristics, shown below in a simplified list.

The method analyzes and evaluates argumentation concerning a contestable claim, one where there is evidence for the claim as well as against it. The claim is tested evidentially by the pro and con arguments that support or attack it.The procedure for examining and criticizing the arguments on both sides forms a dialogue structure in which two sides, the claimant and its opponent, take turns putting forward speech acts (for example, asking questions and putting forward arguments).The dialogue has rules for incurring and retracting commitments that are activated by speech acts. For example, when a participant makes an assertion (claim), he or she becomes committed to the proposition contained in the assertion.The method uses the notion of commitment (acceptance) as the fundamental tool for the analysis and evaluation of argumentation rather than the notion of belief. The reason is that belief is held to be a psychological notion internal to an agent that can only be determined indirectly, by inference to the best explanation of the agent’s speech and actions.The method assumes a database of commonly accepted knowledge that, along with other commitments, provides premises for arguments. The knowledge base is set in place at the opening stage, but can be revised as new relevant information comes in.The method comprises the study of explanations as well as arguments, including the form of argument called inference to the best explanation or abductive reasoning.The dialogue system is dynamic, meaning that it continually updates its database as new information comes in that is relevant to an argument being considered.The arguments advanced are (for the most part) defeasible, meaning that they are subject to defeat as new relevant evidence comes in that refutes the argument.Conclusions are accepted on a presumptive basis, meaning that in the absence of evidence sufficient to defeat it, a claim that is the conclusion of an argument can be tentatively accepted, even though it may be subject to later defeat.The dialogue uses critical questioning as a way of testing plausible explanations and finding weak points in an argument that raise doubt concerning the acceptability of the argument.The method uses standards of proof. Criteria for acceptance are held to depend on standards that require the removal of specifiable degrees of reasonable doubt.The method is based on argumentation schemes, such as argument from expert opinion, that represent commonly used types of arguments that are defeasible.

In the method, schemes work as heuristic devices that only offer presumptive support of a claim that may have to be withdrawn as new evidence comes in. The schemes connect arguments together into sequences, often called chaining, by taking the conclusion of one argument as a premise in a subsequent argument. Some common schemes are argument from goal-based reasoning, argument from negative consequences, argument from positive consequences, inference to the best explanation (abductive reasoning), argument from sign, argument from analogy, argument from precedent, argument from an established rule, argument from evidence to a hypothesis, argument from cause to effect, argument from correlation to cause, argument from sunk costs, argument from threat, argument from perception, argument from witness testimony, argument from expert opinion, argument from ignorance, argument from commitment, direct ad hominem argument, argument from inconsistency of commitments, slippery slope argument (Walton, Reed & Macagno 2008). [2]  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doug_Walton ;

Sharrock's insight:

When looking to find detailed research on dialogue and the ways we communicate, research citing Douglas Walton is a great place to start!

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How to Look Smarter

How to Look Smarter | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Many of the things people do to project intelligence to others can backfire, research shows.
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You Just Had A Fight With A Coworker and Now What? - Fast Company

You Just Had A Fight With A Coworker and Now What? - Fast Company | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Fast Company
You Just Had A Fight With A Coworker&&Now What?
Fast Company
However, the beliefs you connect to that experience need to include your new understanding, what you just learned from your coworker.

Via Eileen Easterly
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Eileen Easterly's curator insight, August 14, 2014 8:35 AM

Great tips for the all important next step after a break in communications, and how best to approach it.

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6-Year-Olds Know When You're Making Sins of Omission

6-Year-Olds Know When You're Making Sins of Omission | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
In a new study, kids gave lower ratings to teachers who left out key details about toys. And once misled, they inspected new toys more carefully.
Sharrock's insight:

Ryan Jacobs says, "Bottom-line: Explain the full-fledged functionality of Super Soakers to your kids or risk losing their trust forever."


 

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Five Tips for Building Strong Collaborative Learning

Five Tips for Building Strong Collaborative Learning | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Students at The College Preparatory School often collaborate in groups, as in this math class where students work together to solve a set of geometry problems in the classroom (above), and then wor
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Whale imitated human speech, scientists say

Whale imitated human speech, scientists say | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Report in Current Biology sparks media frenzy over the beluga balladeer. ...

 

To make those human-like sounds, NOC had to vary the pressure in his nasal tract while making other muscular adjustments and inflating the vestibular sac in his blowhole, the researchers found.

“Our observations suggest that the whale had to modify its vocal mechanics in order to make the speech-like sounds,” said Dr. Sam Ridgway, president of the National Marine Mammal Foundation. “Such obvious effort suggests motivation for contact.”

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Why We Seem To Be Talking More And Working Less—The Nature Of Work Has Changed | Digital Tonto

Why We Seem To Be Talking More And Working Less—The Nature Of Work Has Changed | Digital Tonto | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Mr. Mankins's greater point—and the subject of much of his other writing—is that we should put more thought into how we adopt and use our newfound communication assets. Surely, we all spend time attending meetings and conference calls, reading and responding to messages that could be used more productively. That’s frustrating.

However—and this is a crucial point—we don’t know those interactions will be fruitless until we actually have them.

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How to Run a Meeting of People from Different Cultures

How to Run a Meeting of People from Different Cultures | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Multicultural meetings can be tricky to lead. “People bring their cultural baggage with them wherever they go—and that includes the workplace,” says Jeanne M. Brett, professor of dispute resolution and negotiations at Kellogg School of Management. Communication styles vary from culture to culture as do notions of authority and hierarchy, which only heightens the potential for misunderstanding and hard feelings. “If you don’t prepare for cultural differences and anticipate them at the front end, they’re a lot harder to deal with after the fact,” she says. It’s daunting but you needn’t feel overwhelmed, says Erin Meyer, a professor at INSEAD and the author of The Culture Maps. Approach your cross-cultural meeting with an open mind. And, have faith in your abilities because “you likely have more experience than you know,” adds Andy Molinsky, professor of organizational behavior at Brandeis University International Business School and the author of the book Global Dexterity. “You’ve probably run meetings where there was quite a lot of diversity, be it gender diversity, functional diversity, seniority diversity, or just different personalities—culture is one more element,” he says. Here are some ideas to help ensure that your multicultural meetings go smoothly.

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Effective Ways to Structure Discussion

Effective Ways to Structure Discussion | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
The use of online discussion in both blended and fully online courses has made clear that those exchanges are more productive if they are structured, if there’s a protocol that guides the interaction. This kind of structure is more important in the online environment because those discussions are usually asynchronous and minus all the nonverbal cues that facilitate face-to-face exchanges. But I’m wondering if more structure might benefit our in-class discussions as well.

Students struggle with academic discourse. They have conversations (or is it chats?) with each other, but not discussions like those we aspire to have in our courses. And although students understand there’s a difference between the two, they don’t always know exactly how they’re supposed to talk about academic content when discussing it with teachers and classmates. Would providing more structure provide that clarity and make the value of discussions more obvious to students?

 

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Best Pieces of Parenting Advice

Best Pieces of Parenting Advice | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Here are my 10 best pieces of parenting advice. Trust your gut. Always. Your gut is trying to talk to you. Listen to it. This is one thing I've learned a little late in the game, and I regret that.
Sharrock's insight:

inevitably, a parent of a student in your classroom is going to ask you for parenting advice. Maybe you should hand this out. Keep many at the ready....or is this a bad idea.

 

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A Simple Guide On How To Present Effectively in Public: Speaking.io

A Simple Guide On How To Present Effectively in Public: Speaking.io | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Via Robin Good
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Robin Good's curator insight, April 29, 2014 7:21 AM



Speaking.io is a free web guide to how to present effectively in public curated by @Zach Holman, a subject matter expert, having spoken at a large number of conferences.


The Guide is elegantly organized in multiple sections, each containing a small set of more specific information chapters, and  all accessible from the home page index. 



Good resource for novice public speakers and presenters, as well as another great example of content curation at work. In this case the author has curated his know-how, notes and previous writings into one cohesive and well present gallery.


Helpful. Well designed. 8/10



Check it out now: http://speaking.io/ 


Follow Speaking.io on Twitter


via [url=/u/128177 x-already-notified=1]Ana Cristina Pratas[/url]




Ana Sanchez's curator insight, April 29, 2014 4:51 PM

A very nice summary of all the points you need to think about when preparing a conference presentation. "Because “imagine everyone's naked” is terrible advice."

Alex's curator insight, August 1, 2016 10:51 PM
great point on reacting and reflecting after your presentations to improve for future :)
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9 Tips on How to Be Honest With Someone Without Being Negative

9 Tips on How to Be Honest With Someone Without Being Negative | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Learn how to be honest about sensitive subjects without sounding too negative.

 

Here are 9 key tips on how to be honest with someone:

Look at the situation from their perspective before you do anything.

 

Ask yourself if this is something that really needs to be said. Are you telling them anything they don’t know or haven’t acknowledged?

 

Choose your words carefully – say it to yourself before you say it out-loud. How does it sound?

 

Don’t insult, blame, exaggerate, or be judgmental. Use a calm and respectful tone while describing the problem.

 

Do it in private. You don’t want the person to feel like they are being pressured by a bunch of people all at once.

 

Always offer a solution. Don’t just state a problem if you don’t have some good advice to go with it.

 

Admit you could be wrong. This is just your opinion, the person doesn’t have to agree with you.

 

Let it go if you notice the person is responding negatively toward it. Don’t persist if they aren’t interested in talking about it.

 

Go back to being a good friend again. Don’t make it awkward.
Sharrock's insight:

This might help students as well as teachers and administrators. Social skills need to be taught, sometimes explicitly. Might be useful for a number of different classrooms and social settings, including the speech therapist's space or office when trying to teach pragmatic language skills to students with ADHD/ADD, on the autism spectrum, or students with lagging skills in the language or social skills.

 

I love it when adults say something devastating and rationalize the disasterous response with "I was just being honest." And by love I mean I really really have no patience with such statements. 

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