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Tackling Controversial Issues in the Citizenship Classroom

The purpose of this resource is to provide you as teacher with


 The opportunity to reflect on a number of issues associated with teaching controversial issues in the classroom

A practical approach which allows students to explore controversial issues which arise in citizenship and other areas of the curriculum in a way which is safe for both teacher and students.

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, December 10, 2014 1:17 PM

It has to be practical, because ethics is not theoretical and abstract. Kwame Appiah proposed that when ethics are strictly theoretical and abstract we make water from wine.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Rescooped by Sharrock from Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof
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Legal Intelligence

Legal Intelligence | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
There are a lot of great resources for primary law online, both free and fee. However, to get legal analysis and cutting edge thinking on current legal topics there are also some great resources for free online.

Via Bonnie Hohhof
Sharrock's insight:

We should expose students to these kinds of resources as part of their common core learning pursuits. They do two things: these resources introduce students to laws, making connections between the government and citizenship. The second takewaway from reading these resources is the exposure to critical thinking. People need to learn that laws are interpreted and applied, not simply memorized and followed. Teachers can facilitate the learning of vocabulary, "context", logic, and reasoning. Students might also begin to access their imaginations, exploring how laws might impact their lives. People observe a great deal but don't know how to reflect on those experiences within domains. Psychology and sociology can focus some of that reflection, using vocabulary terms, models, and theory, Occassionally, a gifted teacher might find ways to apply maths. This isn't only about rational thinking. It is also about developing social and emotional intelligence.

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Sharrock's curator insight, October 21, 2013 8:13 AM

We should expose students to these kinds of resources as part of their common core learning pursuits. They do two things: these resources introduce students to laws, making connections between the government and citizenship. The second takewaway from reading these resources is the exposure to critical thinking. People need to learn that laws are interpreted and applied, not simply memorized and followed. Teachers can facilitate the learning of vocabulary, "context", logic, and reasoning. Students might also begin to access their imaginations, exploring how laws might impact their lives. People observe a great deal but don't know how to reflect on those experiences within domains. Psychology and sociology can focus some of that reflection, using vocabulary terms, models, and theory, Occassionally, a gifted teacher might find ways to apply maths. This isn't only about rational thinking. It is also about developing social and emotional intelligence.

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The revolution will NOT be in Open Data | Open Knowledge Foundation Blog

The revolution will NOT be in Open Data | Open Knowledge Foundation Blog | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Sharrock's insight:

This article poses powerful questions about transparency intiatives and access to information:  "What many open data initiatives do not consider is what happens after people are able to access and internalise open data and information. How do people act once they know something? As Vanessa Herringshaw from the Transparency and Accountability Initiative said in the “Raising the Bar for ambition and quality in OGP” session, “We know what transparency should look like but things are a lot less clear on the accountability end of things”. There are a lot of unanswered questions. Do citizens have the agency to take action? Who holds power? What kind of action is appropriate or desirable? Who is listening? And if they are listening, do they care? - See more at: http://blog.okfn.org/2013/10/21/the-revolution-will-not-be-in-open-data/#sthash.Ns2da3cC.dpuf";

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