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How To Cite Social Media In Scholarly Writing

How To Cite Social Media In Scholarly Writing | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
How To Cite Social Media In Scholarly Writing
Sharrock's insight:

Citation Style

Of course, citation style matters, and the two most popular are the APA and MLA.

The APA (American Psychological Association) has their rules for citing social media in academic writing. They even have a thorough ($12) guide to clarify the process, while the MLA (Modern Language Association), as far as we can tell, has yet to expressly address apps and social media as anything other than “software.”

And to an extent, this makes sense. As media becomes more nuanced, new modalities emerge, authors use new channels to distribute their thinking–and even as the “crowd” becomes a legitimate source of information (see wikipedia, twitter, erc.), new rules for governing that reality will continue to emerge. The more general those rules are, the less reactive governing bodies will have to be moment by moment.

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HOME - GENERAL: Citing Sources - LibGuides at Miss Porter's School

HOME - GENERAL: Citing Sources - LibGuides at Miss Porter's School | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
LibGuides. GENERAL: Citing Sources. HOME.

Via Dennis T OConnor
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Karen E Smith's curator insight, March 20, 2014 12:28 PM

Good graphic to pull it together visually.

Karen E Smith's curator insight, March 20, 2014 12:29 PM

Good use of a graphic to pull plagiarism together visually.

Helen Lynch's curator insight, April 9, 2014 10:08 AM

Easy to understand guide to avoiding plagiarism

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Donald Clark Plan B: When Big Data goes bad: 6 epic fails

Donald Clark Plan B: When Big Data goes bad: 6 epic fails | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Data, in the wrong hands, whether malicious, manipulative or naïve can be downright dangerous. Indeed, when big data goes bad it can be lethal. Unfortunately the learning game is no stranger to both the abuse of data. Here’s six examples showing seven species of ‘bad data’. 
Sharrock's insight:

This excerpt kills me: 

1. Data subtraction: Ken RobinsonDon’t let the selective graphical representation of data, destroy the integrity of the data. A good example of blatant data editing is the memorable ‘ritalin’ image used by Sir Ken Robinson in his TED talk at 3.47. This image is taken from its RSA animation.Compare Robinson’s graph with the true source.His has no legend and he’s recalibrated states to look as if there’s zero prescriptions. To understand this data you have to look at its source to understand that the white areas represent states that did NOT participate in the study or did not have reported prescription data. It’s a distortion, an exaggeration to help make a point that the data doesn’t really supportIn fact, much of what passes for fact in Sir Ken Robinson’s TED talks are not supported by any research or data whatsoever.
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