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Studying the American Republic

Studying the American Republic | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
What follows is a list of the works I studied prior to launching my blog in late 2008 (it was then independent, not hosted by WordPress), and prior to posting my white papers on Scribd in late 2009 (a move inspired by the moderator of a blogging community - to which I belonged - who asked me to consider a different platform since my posts were too long, a sin which I still commit.)

You will notice that for the most part, I do not recommend specific chapters or sections. In reading courses at university, professors will undertake such recommendations, either out of consideration for the student’s time, or out of desire to guide the student to the professor’s ideologies.

The former is understandable, the latter contemptible.
Sharrock's insight:

Do historians agree with these texts? Are these texts required reading? What are some other suggested texts to add to E. L. Beck's list? Thoughts?

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The inverted calculus course and self-regulated learning - Casting Out Nines - The Chronicle of Higher Education

The inverted calculus course and self-regulated learning - Casting Out Nines - The Chronicle of Higher Education | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Self-regulated learning is what it sounds like: Learning that is initiated, managed, and assessed by the learners themselves. An instructor can play a role in this process, so it’s not the same thing as teaching yourself a subject (although all successful autodidacts are self-regulating learners), but it refers to how the individual learner approaches learning tasks.

 
Sharrock's insight:

this is part of a series in the higher ed journal The Chronicle. author/mathematician shares experiences and advice as he facilitates the flipped class. 

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Study: You Really Can 'Work Smarter, Not Harder'

Study: You Really Can 'Work Smarter, Not Harder' | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Research shows that reflecting after learning something new makes it stick in your brain.
Sharrock's insight:

excerpt:

"Learning is more effective if a lesson or experience is deliberately coupled with time spent thinking about what was just presented, a new study shows. In “Learning by Thinking: How Reflection Aids Performance,” a team of researchers from HEC Paris, Harvard Business School, and the University of North Carolina describe what they call the first empirical test of the effect of reflection on learning. By “reflection,” they mean taking time after a lesson to synthesize, abstract, or articulate the important points."

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, July 30, 2014 9:06 PM

An important aspect of reflecting and learning is getting beyond what went well and, even when we think we have succeeded, look for the things that were different about this learning.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Cindy Riley Klages's curator insight, July 31, 2014 11:46 PM

Reflection is crucial.  If we don't take time to reflect, we don't take time to improve.

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The Secret of Self-Regulated Learning

The Secret of Self-Regulated Learning | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Self-regulated learning is like your own little secret. It stirs from within you, and is the voice in your head that asks you questions about your learning.

More formally, self-regulated learning is the conscious planning, monitoring, evaluation, and ultimately control of one’s learning in order to maximize it. It’s an ordered process that experts and seasoned learners like us practice automatically. It means being mindful, intentional, reflective, introspective, self-aware, self-controlled, and self-disciplined about learning, and it leads to becoming self-directed.
Sharrock's insight:

from the article:

Self-regulated learning also has meta-emotional and environmental dimensions, which involve asking oneself questions like these:

How motivated am I to do the learning task, and how can I increase my motivation if I need to?If my confidence in my ability to learn this material sags, how can I increase it without becoming overconfident?Am I resisting material that is challenging my preconceptions?How am I reacting to my evaluation of my learning?How can I create the best, most distraction-free physical environment for the task?

Metacognitive questions include these:

What is the best way to go about this task?How well are my learning strategies working? What changes should I make, if any?What am I still having trouble understanding?What can I recall and what should I review?How does this material relate to other things I’ve learned or experienced?
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