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Teacher Tools and Tips
Tools, tips and practices to share with teachers
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BPS Research Digest: As soon as they can read, children trust text instructions over spoken information

BPS Research Digest: As soon as they can read, children trust text instructions over spoken information | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Corriveau's team said their results showed that once children learn to read, "they rapidly come to regard the written word as a particularly authoritative source of information about how to act in the world." They added that in some ways this result is difficult to explain. Young readers are exposed to a good deal of fantasy and fiction in written form, so why should they be so trusting of written instruction? Perhaps they are used to seeing adults act on the basis of written information - such as maps, menus, and recipes - but then again, pre-readers will also have had such experiences. This suggests there's something special about the process of learning to read that leads children to perceive written instruction as authoritative.

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How to Think for Yourself and Question Authority

How to Think for Yourself and Question Authority | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
The mantra "think for yourself and question authority" speaks to a simple truth, which is: society isn't always right, and you have to trust your own heart and mind at the end of the day, no matter what anyone else thinks.
Sharrock's insight:

Something to share with students (and ourselves).

from the article:

from the article: 

 

Always be willing to step back and reflect on what you are told from others. Is what they say true? Do they use evidence and logic to back-up what they say, or are they just trying to win you over with emotions? Are there other possible ways of looking at the situation?

 

Consume information from as many different sources as possible. The more different kinds of thinking you expose yourself to, the easier it is to find what you think makes the most sense. If you are only exposed to one viewpoint, then it’s unlikely you’ll be able to think outside of that limited perspective.

 

Challenge your current beliefs. There’s a good chance that many of the beliefs you already have are influenced by society and your upbringing. Make sure you question your own thoughts and assumptions, you may have learned them at an early age when you weren’t fully capable of thinking for yourself yet.

 

Stay “cognitively flexible.” No matter where you are in life, you’re never going to have all the answers. Make sure that you are always open to new information and willing to admit it when you’re wrong. Thinking for yourself means putting in the work to keep your brain sharp and updated, not just choosing your own beliefs, stubbornly clinging to them, and then never questioning them again.

 

Write your thoughts in a journal/blog/diary. I personally find that spending a little time each day (or week) writing down your thoughts, feelings, and experiences to be a great way of introspecting on your own mind, becoming more familiar with your thought processes, finding potential flaws in your thinking, and making changes in your thinking so that it better serves you and your goals.

These are guidelines on how you should approach thinking, but it’s really up to you to take responsibility over your own thoughts at the end of the day.

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