Teacher Tools and Tips
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Teacher Tools and Tips
Tools, tips and practices to share with teachers
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How Do You Prepare for Death?

How Do You Prepare for Death? | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

The daily work of a hospice nurse, who treats the physical, psychological, and spiritual needs of people at the most vulnerable point of their lives.

Sharrock's insight:
Exploring death and dignity in dying may seem counterintuitive when considering its value when secondary students are at the "beginning of their lives", but teaching students how to ask questions about death helps them better understand how to pursue quality in their living. It gets students--kids and adults--to think about their values and priorities. I once taught a lesson that explored these issues after reading "Flowers for Algernon." After all, Charlie-the-supergenius felt more fully alive and aware than he ever felt as the Charlie that he was before the treatment. Knowing one Charlie was going to become the previous Charlie is a kind of death. With that in mind, we did a writing exercise: How would you like to be remembered? Although it was a writing assignment, the discussion was truly enlightening. Another way was to write your own obituary. 

Talking about death also explores topics like dignity and living a good life. 

If anything, this article could support the reading of "Flowers for Algernon" or any other literature or movie with death and dying as its central themes.

The important thing to remember to do though is to promote positive, growth-mindset, humanistic attitudes. You can introduce other concepts like Bushido, Wu Wei, and religious attitudes towards death and dying. You could also assign the watching of Neil Degrasse Tyson's interview where he discusses death and dying. One video might be found here on Youtube: https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwiqv7bck8rVAhVJ54MKHfMtBgYQtwIIKDAA&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DM3G9LOJZTmM&usg=AFQjCNEa3b84JkMNuJpCdCKCZmFbELUQew.

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Is humiliation part of your teaching toolbox?

Is humiliation part of your teaching toolbox? | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Have you ever…

called a student’s question stupid?

read a student’s paper out loud to a class to illustrate a mistake (anonymously or not), and maybe gone too far in making fun of it?

cracked a joke about a student’s appearance?

revealed some aspect of a student’s personal life for the sake of humor?

torn a student’s paper or thrown it into the trash in front of them or other students?

thrown chalk or a marker or anything else across the room to get students’ attention?

assigned a punishment that would publicly embarrass a student, like wearing something silly or doing something embarrassing in a public place?
 

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Recognizing and Overcoming False Growth Mindset

Recognizing and Overcoming False Growth Mindset | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
In the wake of the many exciting research results, educators became increasingly interested in promoting a growth mindset among their students. This was extremely gratifying. To see some of the great successes was even more gratifying. However, I slowly became aware that not all educators understood the concept fully.
Sharrock's insight:

Among the many misinterpretations and loss of fidelity, I found this issue most probable--excerpt: 

Blaming the Student's Mindset

Perhaps the most discouraging thing that I've heard is how some educators are blaming children's mindsets for their failure to learn. A parent recently wrote me a heartrending letter. Her daughter had been in a wonderful school that, using growth mindset principles, made her feel like an effective learner, even when learning came slowly and with difficulty. She then went to a different school, where children were scolded and shamed -- in the name of a growth mindset -- for not persevering and learning effectively.

It is the educator's task to create a growth mindset classroom. In the safety of these classrooms, students can begin to leave behind their fixed mindset and try out the idea that they can develop their abilities. We see this happening when teachers give students:

Meaningful workHonest and helpful feedbackAdvice on future learning strategiesOpportunities to revise their work and show their learning
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Math attitude influences math achievement

Math attitude influences math achievement | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Bad feelings about math beget bad grades, a new study shows. The good news? Positive feelings are associated with good grades, too.
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The Essential Guide to Happiness at Work, With Rashida Jones

The Essential Guide to Happiness at Work, With Rashida Jones | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
WIRED's guide to being happy at work: optimize your brain, your relationships, and your stuff.
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The Power of Self-Fulfilling Beliefs And How They Really Work

In psychology, there is a concept known as a self-fulfilling prophecy which describes how certain beliefs can influence our actions in a way that makes those beliefs actually come true.
Sharrock's insight:

This is amazing how the self-fulfilling prophecy can work in two directions in the expectations in yourself and the expectations you have for others. This message never gets old; it's a good reminder. 

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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, April 18, 2013 7:37 PM

The fact William Jame is referenced in this article is important. It was his thinking that led to the psychology around the concept of self-fulfilling prophecy. We need to think differently.

David Hain's curator insight, April 19, 2013 2:42 AM

This is an important reminder, these beliefs are permanently at work with good and bad results.