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Tools, tips and practices to share with teachers
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How BrainPop is Breaking Global EdTech Barriers

How BrainPop is Breaking Global EdTech Barriers | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
BrainPop provides educational resources with different BrainPop games, BrainPop videos, lesson plans, research and BrainPop apps all in one website.

Via Adrian Bertolini, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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Adrian Bertolini's curator insight, January 18, 7:14 PM

Educational games and resources have gone through a transformation from clunky game play and poorly designed content in their early days, to breath-taking visuals, clever interactive content and exciting storylines today. 

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Studying the American Republic

Studying the American Republic | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
What follows is a list of the works I studied prior to launching my blog in late 2008 (it was then independent, not hosted by WordPress), and prior to posting my white papers on Scribd in late 2009 (a move inspired by the moderator of a blogging community - to which I belonged - who asked me to consider a different platform since my posts were too long, a sin which I still commit.)

You will notice that for the most part, I do not recommend specific chapters or sections. In reading courses at university, professors will undertake such recommendations, either out of consideration for the student’s time, or out of desire to guide the student to the professor’s ideologies.

The former is understandable, the latter contemptible.
Sharrock's insight:

Do historians agree with these texts? Are these texts required reading? What are some other suggested texts to add to E. L. Beck's list? Thoughts?

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Free Technology for Teachers: PicMonkey + Thinglink = Interactive Collages

Free Technology for Teachers: PicMonkey + Thinglink = Interactive Collages | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
A couple of nights ago my friend Joe, a middle school social studies teacher, sent me a Facebook message about creating multimedia collages. My suggestion to Joe was to use PicMonkey and Thinglink. In the video below I demonstrate how to do that.

Via John Evans
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5 Essential Types of Social Proof (and the Psychology Behind Them)

5 Essential Types of Social Proof (and the Psychology Behind Them) | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

You’re walking along a busy sidewalk, dodging passersby, when a small group of people catches your eye. They’re standing in the middle of the path, heads tilted back in unison, staring at the sky.

 

You look, but you can’t see anything. Still, the crowd stares. You stand with them, searching for the source of their fixation. The crowd grows around you, and soon dozens of people are staring wordlessly into the sky.

 

Believe it or not, this is a real-life study conducted in 1969 by psychologist Stanley Milgram. A small group of people staring silently into an empty sky was influential enough to cause 80% of passersby to copy their actions, without any reason for doing so.

 

The Power of Social Proof

 

This is the power of social proof: our innate psychological tendency to use the wisdom of the crowd to influence our own decisions....


Via Jeff Domansky
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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, March 3, 2:26 AM

Exploring the social media possibilities of social proof.

Marco Favero's curator insight, March 3, 3:44 AM

aggiungi la tua intuizione ...

Teresa Levy's curator insight, March 5, 10:13 AM

this may be the force of a mob

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50 Free Animation Tools And Resources For Digital Learners

50 Free Animation Tools And Resources For Digital Learners | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
50 Free Animation Tools And Resources For Digital Learners
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Scaffolding

Scaffolding | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
This work by Mia MacMeekin is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.
Sharrock's insight:

This is one of the ways teachers are valuable. A learner cannot easily (if at alll) scaffold one's own learning alone. 

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Why Students Think They Understand When They Don't

Why Students Think They Understand When They Don't | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Although familiarity and recollection are different, an insidious effect of familiarity is that it can give you the feeling that you know something when you really don't. For example, it has been shown that if some key words of a question are familiar, you are more likely to think that you know the answer to the question. In one experiment demonstrating this effect (Reder, 1987), subjects were exposed to a variety of word pairs (e.g. "golf" and "par") and then asked to complete a short task that required them to think at least for a moment about the words. Next, subjects saw a set of trivia questions, some of which used words that the subjects had just been exposed to in the previous task. Subjects were asked to make a rapid judgment as to whether or not they knew the answer to the question — and then they were to provide the answer.
Sharrock's insight:

The author suggests: "teachers can help students test their own knowledge in ways that provide more accurate assessments of what they really know — which enables students to better judge when they have mastered material and when (and where) more work is required." 


Self-learning or autodidactic pursuits can suffer for a number of reasons. This articles describes one reason. We also need to be aware of rhetorical fallacies and cognitive biases. We need others--sometimes groups of others--who can challenge our fallacious beliefs and biases. As knowledge is valued for how it deals with complex issues, we also need to support our perspectives and premises rigorously and with validity. 

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How to teach all students to think critically - Phys.Org

How to teach all students to think critically - Phys.Org | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
All first year students at the University of Technology Sydney could soon be required to take a compulsory maths course in an attempt to give them some numerical thinking skills.
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Word Up: The Must Dos of Vocabulary Instruction

Word Up: The Must Dos of Vocabulary Instruction | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Do you display words and use those words daily in class? Check out these five must dos for teaching vocabulary.
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IQ's Corner: The Motivation and Academic Competence (MACM) Commitment Pathway to Learning Model: Crossing the Rubicon to Learning Action

IQ's Corner: The Motivation and Academic Competence (MACM) Commitment Pathway to Learning Model: Crossing the Rubicon to Learning Action | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

When asked by teachers or parents to help understand why a particular student is not achieving adequately, school psychologists have traditionally reached for an intelligence battery.  Although understanding a student’s general, broad and specific cognitive abilities contributes important information for determining general expectations and the need for special instructional serves, at best, measures of cognitive abilities account for only approximately 40% to 50% of a student’s predicted achievement.  Much is still unexplained.  Furthermore, attempts at modifying intelligence, or identifying evidence-based cognitive-aptitude-achievement interactions (ATI's) that can be implemented at the level of individual students, have not yet provided the magical link between cognitive ability testing and evidence-based instructional or cognitive modifiability recommendations.  It is clear that school psychologists must go “beyond IQ” to help teachers, parents, and students themselves, to maximize student learning.

Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: 

" Walberg's (1981) theory of educational productivity is one of the few empirically tested theories of school learning.  Walberg's model is based on an extensive review and integration of over 3,000 studies (DiPerna, Volpe & Stephen, 2002; Wang, Haertel, and Walberg, 1997).  Walberg et al. reported that the following key variables are important for understanding school learning—student ability and prior achievement, motivation, age or developmental level, quantity of instruction, quality of instruction, classroom climate, home environment, peer group, and exposure to mass media outside of school (Walberg, Fraser & Welch, 1986).  The first three variables (ability, motivation, and age) reflect student individual difference characteristics.  The fourth and fifth variables reflect characteristics of instruction (quantity and quality), and the final four variables (classroom climate, home environment, peer group, and exposure to media) represent aspects of the psychological environment(DiPerna et al., 2002).  Clearly student characteristics are important for school learning, but they only comprise a portion of the complete learning equation."

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American Schools Are Training Kids for a World That Doesn't Exist | WIRED

American Schools Are Training Kids for a World That Doesn't Exist | WIRED | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Being dumb in the existing educational system is bad enough. Failing to create a new way of learning adapted to contemporary circumstances might be a national disaster.

Via Ken Morrison
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Ken Morrison's curator insight, October 20, 2014 6:08 PM

I am sharing this post because I feel that it fits well with my earlier scoops regarding Project Based Learning (PBL)

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Three Ways We Can All Become Better Teachers

Three Ways We Can All Become Better Teachers | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

In Building a Better Teacher, Elizabeth Green draws upon years of interviews and research as an education writer and CEO of Chalkbeat to make the case for why teaching is a craft and that it can be taught to anyone.  Her excellent book should be read for a detailed account of the history of teacher education, an international context, and an entertaining narrative.  Here, I have distilled a few core insights from Elizabeth that each of us can use in learning to become a better teacher both inside and outside the classroom.

 
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How Teachers Can Create Videos That Engage Students - Education Week

How Teachers Can Create Videos That Engage Students - Education Week | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
As a teacher, you may think slick production is the way to go in building engaging learning videos, but new data shows that variables within your control (and budget!) have more of an impact.

Via John Evans
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Ness Crouch's curator insight, August 29, 2014 7:39 PM

Videos are a great way to engage students. Yes it can be time consuming but can be used over and over again.

WEAC's curator insight, August 31, 2014 10:28 AM

Here's a good back-to-school overview about creating classroom videos.

Reshelle Johnson's curator insight, September 1, 2014 11:36 AM

I enjoyed making instructional videos for my students and letting them make them as well.  This article covers why we should not be hung up on having a polished video because shorter, less formal videos can be more effective.  I used the app Explain Everything on my iPad to record lessons, but there are some who say that having the teacher in the video is more effective.  I wasn't ready for that.

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Young children trust kindness over expertise

Young children trust kindness over expertise | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

BPS Research Digest:

 

A follow-up study with more young children provided the crucial test of whether they'd be more trusting of kindness or expertise. This time the same two experts were either nice or nasty, as conveyed by their body language, facial expression and tone of voice. Benevolence and expertise were counterbalanced so sometimes the eagle expert was nice, sometimes the bike expert. The children showed a clear overall bias for believing the suggestions of the nicer person (70 per cent overall). They only showed a preference for listening to the man with relevant expertise if he was also nice.

A third and final study was similar but this time the researchers set up a choice between a nice or nasty relevant expert, and a nice or nasty second man who was described explicitly as lacking any relevant expertise. This was to make sure that the children weren't assuming that a nice expert could have knowledge beyond his stated field. Once again the children were swayed by niceness and this time paid even less attention to expertise (i.e. they chose the nice person's answers 62 per cent of the time, and this only rose to 65 per cent if he was also an expert).

Sharrock's insight:

When you start to question whether students should trust your expertise rather than how kind you are sharing your expertise, think again. This research suggests that saying something nicely does have an impact.

 

The research focuses on young children 3-5.

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Free Technology for Teachers: Convert PDFs to Google Docs to Differentiate Instructional Materials

Free Technology for Teachers: Convert PDFs to Google Docs to Differentiate Instructional Materials | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Recently, we discovered a feature of Google Drive that has changed how we prepare and access materials and resources for our students. As we attempt to make all curricula digital and thus make it available to all students, the idea of using PDFs was always a problem. PDFs are just not editable in most situations, and this was an issue when it came to modifying and differentiating documents. Adobe Acrobat was our “go to” application for this type of conversion, but it was costly and often hard to come by in an educational setting. Note: We still use Adobe Acrobat for complex projects or documents that do not convert well in Google Drive. With the most recent update to Google Drive, OCR (Optical Character Recognition) capabilities are better and easier than ever.

Via John Evans
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Statistics Outgrowing Other STEM Fields

Statistics Outgrowing Other STEM Fields | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
A New Social Science? Statistics Outgrowing Other STEM Fields

 

Statistics—the science of learning from data—is the fastest-growing science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) undergraduate degree in the United States over the last four years, an analysis of federal government education data conducted by the American Statistical Association (ASA) revealed.

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The threshold concept and the design of learning experiences

The threshold concept and the design of learning experiences | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
The threshold concept is an important one in the development of curriculum and learning experiences in general. I came across this excellent resource provided by UCL Department of Electronic and El...
Sharrock's insight:

(excerpt) "In the Four E’s Model” for engaging teams in change efforts, education is  identified as technical work. It is not. It is both technical and adaptive and the development of any training program or informal learning experience, whether face-to-face, online, or a blended version of the two, must consider the adaptive change required to integrate learning, not just into the day-to-day of performing technical work, but into the development of new mindsets required to make this technical work successful. "

 
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The Common Core Has Not Killed Literature

The Common Core Has Not Killed Literature | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Jaume Escofet/Flickr By now almost every teacher in the country has experienced the Common Core State Standards. We’re teaching and assessing them; we’re advocating for them or pushing against them.
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7 Good Examples of Gamification in Education - EdTechReview™ (ETR)

7 Good Examples of Gamification in Education - EdTechReview™ (ETR) | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Various edtech companies are working for some effective ways to create process of learning “fun”. Here are some of the good examples of gamification in education.
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Khan Academy for iPad Updated: Brings 150K Learning Exercises & More | iPad Insight

Khan Academy for iPad Updated: Brings 150K Learning Exercises & More | iPad Insight | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
The wonderful Khan Academy iPad app has been updated this week, to Version 2.0.

This is a major update for an already superb educational app. It brings access to everything that’s available at Khan Academy online – including some 150,000 learning exercises as well as personalized recommendations.

Khan Academy is a great educational tool for all ages; the iPad version has always been a great app – and now it’s even better.

Via John Evans
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Kerry Muste's curator insight, January 22, 11:12 PM

Khan Academy is a great resource for blended learning.

AnnC's curator insight, January 25, 9:51 PM

Khan Academy just keeps getting better!

elearning at eCampus ULg's curator insight, January 26, 10:00 AM

Excellent new, please enroll anyone in your family, this is an can't miss 

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Tackling Controversial Issues in the Citizenship Classroom

The purpose of this resource is to provide you as teacher with


 The opportunity to reflect on a number of issues associated with teaching controversial issues in the classroom

A practical approach which allows students to explore controversial issues which arise in citizenship and other areas of the curriculum in a way which is safe for both teacher and students.

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, December 10, 2014 1:17 PM

It has to be practical, because ethics is not theoretical and abstract. Kwame Appiah proposed that when ethics are strictly theoretical and abstract we make water from wine.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Are You Not Entertained? How to Build a Dynamic Lecture

Are You Not Entertained? How to Build a Dynamic Lecture | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Mix It Up
Don't be a purist. Use different styles, formats and media when you lecture, like Pecha Kucha, the 60-Second Lecture, or the Punctuated Lecture. Joan Middendor and Alan Kalish collected dozens of "change up" lecture strategies that I refer to several times a semester. And the Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning at Harvard links to dozens of lecture innovations, including Twenty Ways to Make Lectures More Participatory.
Sharrock's insight:

Lecture has its place but it doesn't have to be long and boring. Don't forget TEDx presentations are also lectures. 

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The Thanksgiving Story: The Pilgrims Revisited

The Thanksgiving Story: The Pilgrims Revisited | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Explore resources for exploding myths about the Pilgrims, the Indians, the Mayflower and the First Thanksgiving.
Sharrock's insight:

The Thanksgiving Story: The Pilgrims Revisited

The Internet is full of useful materials for exploding myths about the Pilgrims, the Indians, the Mayflower, and the First Thanksgiving. Whether you teach kindergarten or college, you'll find valuable information and teaching tools on the WWW. This week, Education World explores the best of those online resources.


Another excerpt:

"perhaps the most comprehensive source of information about the Mayflower and its passengers can be found at Caleb Johnson's Mayflower Web Pages. Visitors to this site get a fascinating glimpse of Pilgrim life that's sure to surprise, intrigue, and sometimes shock. Here, you can learn about the Mayflower's physical dimensions; see the ship's passenger and crew lists; find out about the lives of the girls and women aboard ship; read accounts of the Pilgrims' voyage, landing, and settlement of Plymouth; and learn the truth about their relationship with the local Indians. The site contains a first-person account of the First Thanksgiving celebration, a photograph of the Mayflower's original passenger list written by William Bradford, versions of the Pilgrim's Peace Treaty with Massasoit, copies of the Pilgrims' wills and estate inventories, and other documents that provide unique insights into the lives of the Pilgrims. Information about Pilgrim food, clothing, weapons, and games is also provided.


"Additional resources at the site include a Message to Teachers, a link to a page of myths about the Pilgrims and the First Thanksgiving that have been taught in classrooms for generations, an area that allows students to email questions to the site's creator, some slightly scandalous accounts of the personal and criminal history of some Mayflower passengers -- and much, much more. In fact, exploring this site is almost as great an adventure as the one it describes."

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Don't Believe The Myth Of The Billionaire College Dropout

Don't Believe The Myth Of The Billionaire College Dropout | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Mark Zuckerberg really is the exception.

 

the major take home message is this: Nearly all American billionaires attended at least some college with the vast majority of them graduating from college. So if you want to be a billionaire, this analysis would suggest that to maximize your chances you should not drop out of college.

Unless, of course, 1. you have a Thiel Fellowship, or 2. you are the next Gates, Zuckerberg, or Jobs and the opportunities presented to you are simply too good to resist.

Sharrock's insight:

Something to share with kids who think college is useless...

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What Are The Habits Of Mind? - Te@chThought

What Are The Habits Of Mind? - Te@chThought | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Habits of Mind are dispositions that are skillfully and mindfully employed by characteristically intelligent, successful people when they are confronted with problems, the solutions to which are not immediately apparent.  When we draw upon these mental resources, the results are more powerful, of higher quality, and of greater significance than if we fail to employ those habits."

 


Via John Evans
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LUZ DEL MAR's curator insight, August 30, 2014 12:56 AM

posibles causas del desinteres el no manejo de habilidades cognitivas