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Under pressure to sext? Applying the theory of planned behaviour to adolescent sexting

Under pressure to sext? Applying the theory of planned behaviour to adolescent sexting | Teacher Learning Networks | Scoop.it

(2013). Under pressure to sext? Applying the theory of planned behaviour to adolescent sexting. Behaviour & Information Technology. 

Linda Alexander's insight:

The full  text of this adolescent research is available here.  A few highlights:  parental threats of monitoring cell phones played no significant role in the decision-making; the perceived "trust" of the party who will receive the sext plays a role; girls have a more negative view of sexting than do boys; social pressure plays a huge role; sexting and information regarding social pressure should be incorporated into sex education. 

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Carol Dweck & New Research: Can You Make Teens Less Aggressive?

Carol Dweck & New Research: Can You Make Teens Less Aggressive? | Teacher Learning Networks | Scoop.it
Teens who learn that behavior can change react less aggressively to others.
Linda Alexander's insight:

Research Findings: "Our findings can inform theories of how social cognitive development can influence adolescent aggression. Past research has suggested that adolescents show an increased belief in the fixed nature of transgressors’ traits and behaviors (e.g., Killen et al., 2010). Relatedly, the early years of high school are a time of heighted social comparison, where one’s social label (especially if it is seen as a fixed label) can be a source of pride or shame, and therefore a powerful influence on how one copes with peer conflict (e.g., Brown, Mory, & Kinney, 1994; Crosnoe, 2011; Eccles & Barber, 1999). Overall, adolescence was predicted to be a special period during which beliefs about the potential for people to change their personal characteristics could play a particularly important role in aggressive retaliation….

Peer victimization or exclusion, as we have noted, can also lead to depression and other internalizing symptoms, and previous correlational research has suggested that this is especially likely when children hold more of an entity theory (Rudolph, 2010). Our experimental study showed that an incremental theory intervention could buffer adolescents from the effects of peer victimization. When adolescents who reported higher levels of victimization were taught to see themselves and others as capable of change, they reported fewer depressive symptoms compared with adolescents who received no treatment.

 

Additional information and an interview with Dr. Carol Dweck of "Mindsets" may be located on this blog:  

http://larryferlazzo.edublogs.org/2013/06/20/interesting-new-study-by-carol-dweck/?utm_source=buffer&utm_campaign=Buffer&utm_content=bufferaa84b&utm_medium=twitter#.UcNb3Di1feM.twitter

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