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Rescooped by Linda Alexander from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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170 Ways To Use Word Clouds In Every Classroom

170 Ways To Use Word Clouds In Every Classroom | Teacher Learning Networks | Scoop.it
Welcome to a post I always have  fun writing. Last year I attempted finding ways to use Word Clouds (Wordle) in education. When I concluded writing that post I was at 108 possible ways. More than a...

 

Gust MEES: I created the above "Wordle Logo" with "Word Clouds" as example. You may use it for non-commercial use by giving credit to my blog ===> http://gustmees.wordpress.com/ <===

 

Check the free service here:

 

http://www.wordle.net/

 


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Ludmila Smirnova's curator insight, May 14, 12:34 PM

Fantastic 108 ideas, Gust Mees!

Russell Taylor's curator insight, May 16, 1:00 AM

I use Word Clouds regularly on my VLE (Moodle) courses.  They do need explaining sometimes, which makes me think they are less valuable than some other graphics, but there are lots of ideas here I am going to try.

M Bresson's curator insight, May 21, 7:18 AM

Des idées pour utiliser les nuages de  mots en classe dans toutes les disciplines. Créer une discussion, partager, comparer, proposer des hypothèses, travailler le vocabulaire, etc.

Rescooped by Linda Alexander from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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20 Signs You’re Actually Making A Difference As A Teacher

20 Signs You’re Actually Making A Difference As A Teacher | Teacher Learning Networks | Scoop.it
Other Data: 20 Signs You’re Actually Making A Difference As A Teacher

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Linda Alexander's insight:

This is a wonderful  list!  

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Trish Harris's curator insight, March 3, 3:22 PM

some worthy comments on what to reflect on when data overwhelms... 

Siti Noraisha Mohamed Senin's curator insight, March 4, 5:52 AM

Researchers at the University of Leicester have proven that students assign the most authority to teachers who care about them. If this is true, then you are demonstrating a wonderful principle: that respect comes from kind behavior.

Filipe Cálix's curator insight, March 4, 10:44 AM

Este post não se relaciona diretamente com  os temas habitualmente aqui tratados mas conduz-nos a um importante momento de reflexão profisssional. Questões simples. Sê-lo-ão as respostas?

Rescooped by Linda Alexander from Studying Teaching and Learning
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What's In and What's Out in Education

What's In and What's Out in Education | Teacher Learning Networks | Scoop.it

I really like what's in and what's out of current trends.  I created the following chart of what I hope and wish would be education ins and outs in the NEAR future.

 

Learn more:

 

http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/01/23/is-your-professional-development-up-to-date/

 

 


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Odile Dupont's curator insight, May 6, 12:19 AM

Des idées évidentes mais sans doute pas encore pour tout le monde !

ExamTime's curator insight, May 6, 1:42 AM

I think learners producing content rather than simply consuming is an important point to keep in mind. This idea is the basis of why ExamTime, the elearning web-app I work on, was created. With ExamTime, students create their own Mind Maps, Flashcards and other learning aids to improve their understanding of theory and overall learning. 

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, May 6, 9:55 AM

Relationships are at the centre of education. It is no longer teacher-centred or learner-centred. In a sense, teachers and students are learning alongside each other. I am not sure it will always be the teacher leading the way although they have to be willing to know when to let go and when to take charge. Content is still incredibly important in that unless it connects to the lives of teachers and students it is not practical and meaningful. Technology is rarely seamlessly integrated.

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For Teenage Brains, the Importance of Continuing to Learn Deeply

For Teenage Brains, the Importance of Continuing to Learn Deeply | Teacher Learning Networks | Scoop.it

From blogs.kqed.org - Today, 10:29 AM
 It used to be that neuroscientists thought smart people were all alike. But now they think that some very smart people retain the ability to learn rapidly, like a child, well into adolescence.

“Until adolescence there are lots of new connections being made between neurons to store patterns and information collected from the environment,” Brant says.

The brain adds many synapses in the cortex. This comes at a time when the brain is especially responsive to learning. This is typically followed by cortical pruning in adolescence, as the brain shifts from hyperlearning mode.

Hewitt agrees: “The developing brain is a much more flexible organ than the mature brain.”

Learning doesn’t stop at adolescence, of course, but the “sensitive period” — where the brain is hyperlearning mode — does appear to come to an end. Learning new things gets harder.

 


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Linda Alexander's insight:

There was an NPR discussion on this topic today---surely the interview is available if you're up to the SEARCH. 

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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's comment, September 24, 2013 8:44 AM
Thanks Linda. I appreciate the reference to the NPR discussion.
EerstehulpSEO's curator insight, September 24, 2013 10:56 PM

brilliant

Sharla Shults's curator insight, October 2, 2013 2:40 PM

For some reason, as kids get older, they no longer 'think that thinking' is important! They don't want to think; instead, they simply just want the answer.