TBHS General Geography
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Child Marriage: 38,000 Girls Under-18 Forced to Marry Daily Around the World

Child Marriage: 38,000 Girls Under-18 Forced to Marry Daily Around the World | TBHS General Geography | Scoop.it
Plan International Australia report reveals 14 million girls under-18 are forced to marry every year.

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How Cities Use Design to Drive Homeless People Away

How Cities Use Design to Drive Homeless People Away | TBHS General Geography | Scoop.it

"Saying 'you're not welcome here'—with spikes."


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Michael MacNeil's curator insight, August 2, 2014 8:38 AM

Lack of understanding of mental disability can lead to heartlessness. There is so much that needs to be done.

dilaycock's curator insight, August 3, 2014 3:50 AM

I'd never really taken notice, or heard of some,  of the architectural deterrents mentioned here. I can't believe that we, as a society, go to such lengths to make life even more difficult for those already struggling. 

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:52 PM

APHG-U7

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Terrifying Animation Shows How Chile’s Tsunami Took Over the Entire Pacific Ocean | Science | WIRED

Terrifying Animation Shows How Chile’s Tsunami Took Over the Entire Pacific Ocean | Science | WIRED | TBHS General Geography | Scoop.it
This time-lapse animation simulates how waves caused by the magnitude 8.2 earthquake in Chile on April 1 spread across the Pacific Ocean over 30 hours. The animation really highlights the reach of a dangerous tsunami.

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dilaycock's curator insight, April 3, 2014 6:28 PM

Excellent animation to show how extensive the effects of the Chilean earthquake were, and, with an increase in magnitude, how devastating the effects could have been for some Pacific nations.

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The World's Most Densely Populated Cities

The World's Most Densely Populated Cities | TBHS General Geography | Scoop.it
The growth of these cities will create a host of environmental and health problems.

 

By 2210, the global population is expected to grow from just more than 7 billion to 11.3 billion — with 87 percent of the population living in urban areas, according to a new working paper by researchers from NYU’s Marron Institute.

Most of these individuals will be in what’s now the developing world — creating a host of environmental and health problems.

If projections are correct, these new urban dwellers will require the world’s existing cities to expand six-fold to accommodate triple the residents, Richard Florida wrote in The Atlantic. Plus, the world will need 500 new “megacities” of 10 million or more, he wrote.


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Valerie Bauwens's curator insight, March 28, 2014 4:46 AM

Or will there be a natural come back to the country side?

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 2, 2014 5:42 PM

 Cairo, Egypt has a population density of 9,400 residents per square kilometer. THese numbers are crazy think about it compared to MA or RI and our major cities.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 8:03 PM

APHG-U2 & U6

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Why Leaders Should Learn Geography - GeoLounge

Why Leaders Should Learn Geography - GeoLounge | TBHS General Geography | Scoop.it

Anne-Laure Fréant talks about the importance of geographic knowledge in today's society. Kirk Goldsberry mentioned in “The Importance of Spatial Thinking” that “Harvard eradicated its Geography Department in the 1940′s, and many universities followed suit”. Indeed, not only has geography never been part of business programs, it gradually vanished from education fields that matter in prestigious schools, with no major revival since the 1940′s.


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Maree Whiteley's curator insight, February 26, 2014 3:56 AM

Simple logic really..."It is a way of thinking that crosses time and space at any possible scale to see and understand what is happening. It connects the dimensions of the world – societies, environment, economy, politics, finance, psychology… – by offering unique key concepts and theoretical tools."

Hoolee Nan's curator insight, March 30, 2014 5:14 PM

A great way to do a virtual excursion with the classroom. Children can learn about landmarks, directions, the jargon in maps and other aspects of geography.

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Street life: how do you revive a dull urban area?

Street life: how do you revive a dull urban area? | TBHS General Geography | Scoop.it
Sixty-six years ago, the esteemed town planner Frank Heath took a bite out of his home town of Melbourne – from a safe distance. The Melbourne Herald was interviewing Heath in London. Quite possibly causing…

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dilaycock's curator insight, February 27, 2014 12:31 AM

Thriving urban communities are the product of more than just planning.

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40 more maps that explain the world

40 more maps that explain the world | TBHS General Geography | Scoop.it

I've searched wide and far for maps that can reveal and surprise and inform in ways that the daily headlines might not.


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Drying of the Aral Sea

Explore a global timelapse of our planet, constructed from Landsat satellite imagery. With water diverted to irrigation, the inland Aral Sea has shrunk drama...

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Kaitlin Young's curator insight, October 7, 2014 11:27 AM

The Aral Sea’s receding waters could prove fatal to the surrounding agriculture. Both Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan diverted the rivers that flowed into the Sea in the 1960s to feed their growing cotton and rice farms. Over the last five decades, the lack of a water source flowing into the Aral Sea combined with harsher droughts due to climate change have caused the water to evaporate at an alarming rate. As the water evaporates, large deposits of minerals remain on the bare lake bed. Winds pick up the mineral deposits and often spread them onto farms, where the increased salinity destroys rice paddies and other crops. The destruction of crops causes less food production, so less money is made by the farmers and more money has to be spent to bring in food to avoid famine. Cotton crops are also destroyed, so the region loses yet another source of income.

The increased evaporation of the Aral Sea has also caused an incredible increase to salinity levels in the lake itself. The extremely salty water cannot be used without heavy removing the salt, which is incredibly unaffordable in an already stressed region. Small subsidence farmers and local farmers cannot use the resource at hand. The fishing industry has completely collapsed, thus removing another important resource from the area.

If a wounded economy and unreliable food was not enough, the air born minerals blown away from the lake are causing numerous health problems. Respiratory issues, such as asthma, are becoming more and more common in the communities surrounding the Aral Sea due to the minerals and industrial debris in the air. The disappearance of the Sea has created the perfect conditions for the collapse of a region. The struggle that the people have to endure often escalates into increased social and political unrest, and disputes often occur. The Aral Sea exemplifies how one small environmental change can set off a chain of devastating events that lead to irreversible effects.

               

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, October 19, 2014 8:19 PM

The drying of the Aral Sea opens our eyes to how fragile our environment is and the scarcity of resources.  We need to become more aware of our resources, because as they saying goes, the "well will run dry."

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, December 7, 2015 1:14 PM

The massive changes to the Aral Sea can clearly be seen through the course of a decade. It's so unbelievable that from 2000 on ward it shrunk significantly and the video also showed the development of agricultural land that surrounds the rivers feeding into the Sea. The more water being irrigated and are not putting into the Sea the more it dries up because the water is evaporated with little to no rain going back to it. This is definitely one of the worst man-made disaster that have happened to this region.

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Places in their Proper Perspectives

Places in their Proper Perspectives | TBHS General Geography | Scoop.it

"A fisherman's cottage is described by real estate agents as a 'property not to be missed' but it is also just yards away from two nuclear power stations."


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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, January 31, 2014 6:19 PM

Versões...

Fern Torres's curator insight, February 3, 2014 4:11 PM

Perception is everything!

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 16, 2014 1:35 PM

This house is 100% misleading. The paper advertised the first picture, which from the looks of it isn't so bad. Then when you get the reverse picture and see the nuclear power plants behind it, its a whole new scene! Whoever is trying to sell this house- good luck to you. Who wants to live next to something that could literally kill god knows what? Not me. 

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The Mystery House

"In Raleigh, N.C., there's a house... or what looks like a house. What's hidden inside is more important than most people realize. Read the story: http://wunc.org/post/video-whats-inside-house-wade-avenue "


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Ms. Harrington's curator insight, January 25, 2014 10:06 AM

A great introduction to city planning

 

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2014/01/17/263476645/whats-inside-this-mystery-house-in-north-carolina

 

 

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, January 27, 2014 4:11 PM

This short YouTube clip focuses on the Governments creative ways of keeping city planning out of the eyes of everyday people. Not only do these creative ways allow cities to remain unvandalised, but they also eliminate the eye sores of waterplants and towers. I think these ideas are great and allow communities to remain beautiful and inviting. 

Tracy Galvin's comment, January 30, 2014 3:00 PM
This is a really nice example of a respect for the neighborhood. By disguising the building it doesn't create an eyesore in the community but will allow the plant to provide a service to the neighbors. This keeps property values high and the neighbors happy.
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7 Cities with Great Green Projects

7 Cities with Great Green Projects | TBHS General Geography | Scoop.it
Cities can be hot-spots of pollution, with thousands or millions of people, cars, pets, industries, and more contributing to global warming.

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oyndrila's curator insight, December 17, 2013 10:01 AM

Green projects help cities to be socially and environmentally sustainable.

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Super typhoon Haiyan strikes Philippines, among strongest storms ever

Super typhoon Haiyan strikes Philippines, among strongest storms ever | TBHS General Geography | Scoop.it
Super typhoon Haiyan, thought to be the strongest storm to ever hit land, is carving a destructive path through the central Philippines.

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Location, Location: Coastal Living

Location, Location: Coastal Living | TBHS General Geography | Scoop.it
Students prepare a news report that highlights problems facing coastal communities and how climate change might affect coastal populations.

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dilaycock's curator insight, December 1, 2013 9:10 PM

Activity could be used in regard to the study of coasts, population, and climate change.

Heather Ramsey's curator insight, December 2, 2013 1:02 PM
This lesson is written for Grades 3-5, but could be adapted for middle or high school students as well. If done correctly, it would make a great inquiry lesson.
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New Zealand’s Southern Alps have lost a third of their ice

New Zealand’s Southern Alps have lost a third of their ice | TBHS General Geography | Scoop.it
A third of the permanent snow and ice of New Zealand’s Southern Alps has now disappeared, according to our new research based on National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research aerial surveys. Since…

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Poop Stories

Poop Stories | TBHS General Geography | Scoop.it

"From the time we’re about 6 years old, everyone loves a good poop joke, right? But is there something more meaningful lurking beneath the bathroom banter? Take a look at some international potty humor and then follow the jokes to a deeper understanding. Every laugh on this page reflects a life and death issue: the very real sanitation problems facing India today."


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Amanda Morgan's curator insight, November 10, 2014 4:19 PM

It is fascinating that a country so many lives are lost due to something we find simple and trivial, and really do not even think about but use on a daily basis.

Jessica Robson Postlethwaite's curator insight, November 18, 2014 7:03 PM

World toilet day!

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, November 20, 2015 4:49 PM

Often when people are faced with a tragic fact they instantly attempt to shut it out because it makes them uncomfortable. In the same way Americans can walk past five homeless people a day and not bat and eye...its easier. Using comedy to address a dire situation such as India's sanitation standards, is an ingenious way to get people to actually listen

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How wetlands can help us adapt to rising seas

How wetlands can help us adapt to rising seas | TBHS General Geography | Scoop.it
Instead of costly levees and seawalls, coastal ecosystems could offer an alternative way to protect Australia’s coastal communities from rising seas, saving money and storing carbon along the way. Sea…

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dilaycock's curator insight, March 31, 2014 6:19 PM

Working with nature to reduce the impact of a rising sea level.

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Factors considered for urban redevelopment


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oyndrila's curator insight, March 8, 2014 10:45 PM

Urban redevelopment is one of the solutions to handle rising rates of urbanisation. This article explains the factors that are considered to develop a sustainable strategy of redevelopment in urban areas.

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Indonesia's volcanic eruptions- poor preparedness and vulnerability

Indonesia's volcanic eruptions-  poor preparedness and vulnerability | TBHS General Geography | Scoop.it
Poor preparedness left communities near Mount Sinabung more vulnerable than those hit by much larger Mount Kelud eruption

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oyndrila's curator insight, February 26, 2014 9:55 AM

The article explains the vulnerability of  communities living in areas prone to tectonic hazard events.

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Why So Many Emerging Megacities Remain So Poor

Why So Many Emerging Megacities Remain So Poor | TBHS General Geography | Scoop.it
How globalization has changed the nature of urban development.

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Marcelle Searles's curator insight, January 25, 2014 3:34 AM

useful for Year 9, 10 and 11 Geography units

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, January 30, 2014 10:21 PM

Around the world is the same set of problems. Check the Esri  resources that are used to compare cities.

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Bali's rubbish tsunami

Bali's rubbish tsunami | TBHS General Geography | Scoop.it
Indonesian monsoon rain, storms and wild winds have sent a wave of plastic into Bali's beaches in the month of January like Bali has never seen or had to contend with before.

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dilaycock's curator insight, January 26, 2014 11:36 PM

Not quite the Bali that appears in the travel brochures!

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The London Array

The London Array | TBHS General Geography | Scoop.it

Twenty kilometers (12 miles) from England’s Kent and Essex coasts, the world’s largest offshore wind farm has started harvesting the breezes over the sea. Located in the Thames Estuary, where the River Thames meets the North Sea, the London Array has a maximum generating power of 630 megawatts (MW), enough to supply as many as 500,000 homes.

The wind farm became fully operational on April 8, 2013. Twenty days later, the Operational Land Imager (OLI) on the Landsat 8 satellite captured this image of the area. The second image is a closeup of the area marked by the white box in the top image. White points in the second image are the wind turbines; a few boat wakes are also visible. The sea is discolored by light tan sediment—spring runoff washed out by the Thames.


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Albert Jordan's curator insight, January 29, 2014 8:16 PM

England is in a peculiar situation due to their geographic location limiting their ability to expand outward and collect homegrown resources. As the first world nations push towards a “greener” and more sustainable energy producing ability, the effects of trying to help the Earth, both positive and negative need to be taken into effect. As some opponents to the wind farm have brought up, it can negatively affect the bird species in the area. What matters most? England’s attempt to wean themselves off of unsustainable resource dependence in order to enhance the future generations may be seen as a positive but with every action, there is a reaction.

 The issue that comes up as we humans try to better our relationship with the Earth in an effort not to destroy our home, paired with our lust for a healthy and non-apocalyptic future that we can still absorb ourselves into social media – do we negatively impact local animal species for our greater cause or do we limit our footprint even if it takes a viable option for the enhancement of our own resource dependence off the table. I guess if the long term effect on the birds and the resulting issues of their no longer presence was fully and responsibly researched and the pros and cons were compared to each other, then time will tell if the wind farm does more harm or good.

Shiva Prakash's curator insight, February 3, 2014 11:21 PM

Technology is changing the shopping habits of buyers. Compete recently conducted a survey that reported a rapid increase in the number of people using their mobile devices for shopping Online shopping which u can buy from home easily with lots of designs of cloths and new technology mobile phones without going out for shopping just click here to go eaZy http://shopdeer.blogspot.in/

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 5, 2014 3:08 PM

It is very nice to see alternative forms of energy being explored. The conscious effort to cut carbon emissions is a benefit for the entire planet.

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40 more maps that explain the world

40 more maps that explain the world | TBHS General Geography | Scoop.it
I've searched wide and far for maps that can reveal and surprise and inform in ways that the daily headlines might not.

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Terheck's curator insight, January 26, 2014 5:58 AM

Une sélection de 40 cartes qui permettent de mieux comprendre notre monde.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 11, 2014 2:30 PM

When looking at this map there area few things that stick out to me and not just the colors. Fistly what I founf interesting was that South America in relation to where we live is quite different. For example, The US economic status is High Class at $12195 or more for most of the East and West Coast and then it is dull in the middle. These facts compared to South America where they are mostly upper middle class at around $3946-12185 and a portion of them are the lower middle class which rings in at around $886-3945.

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 13, 2014 2:39 PM

 On map 33, it shows the religious borders map of the different religions that are occupying certain areas of the Middle East. The area of Baghdad and east is mostly Shiite Islam and west of Baghdad is Sunni Islam. What I found to be most interesting is that even though Jerusalem is surrounded by many different religions they still celebrate Judaism. They are religiously protected by its borders. There is some sign of Sunni Islam being practices within their borders but it is mostly dominated by Judaism. 

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Concentrations of Wealth and Poverty

Concentrations of Wealth and Poverty | TBHS General Geography | Scoop.it

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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, December 18, 2013 9:59 AM

See where the wealth and poverty are in America using this great map.

Chandrima Roy's curator insight, January 9, 2014 10:44 PM

wonderful

 

Ishwer Singh's curator insight, January 20, 2014 6:56 AM

This picture shows the cocentrations of poverty and affluence.  The areas hilighted in yellow show the areas which are wealthy and the dark blue showing the poor. This coincides with the amout of pay and the education levels in these countries. Areas such as Boston, New York and Washington show high cocentrations of affluence. These areas also have much higher education systems and more well -paid jobs. Countries which are highlighted in dark blue are countries with lesser education and lesser paid jobs. This shows the  extent at which poverty can affect a country.

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Geography Right Here. Right Now.

Amazing facts for a Geography of the 21st Century. See www.geography.org.uk See www.pupilvision.com


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Maree Whiteley's curator insight, November 3, 2013 9:26 PM
What is Geography? Why teach Geography?
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The Debate Over Globalization

The Debate Over Globalization | TBHS General Geography | Scoop.it
Students research, analyze, and debate the pros and cons of globalization.

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dilaycock's curator insight, December 1, 2013 9:06 PM

Useful lesson on the pros and cons of globalisation for Years 6-12. 

Via Nicole Bailey at Barker College.