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Jails must stop being 'Victorian warehouses' #prison #criminology

Jails must stop being 'Victorian warehouses' #prison #criminology | Tasmania Prison Service Exposed | Scoop.it

Via Charlotte Bilby
Miriam Scurrah's insight:

We are still warehousing in Tasmania. Throughcare is a rhetoric, not a reality and rehabilitation is non existant for the majority of prisoners.

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Author Glenn Thomas Langohr's comment, July 19, 2013 12:02 PM
After serving 10 years in California prisons and 4 years in solitary confinement, I just spoke about that on PBS~ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6csHeGqpe20 Tap this link for my Prison Books~ http://amzn.to/1bhqCUh I shined a light on Prison Overcrowding, the Hunger Strike, the lack of Rehabilitation and then pointed to a better way. To check out "My Hardest Step" in Print, being adapted for TV go here~ http://amzn.to/1930Lif
Darcy Delaproser's comment, July 19, 2013 12:16 PM
Thank you for sharing Glen
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Councils and farmers in push to let prisoners out to work

Councils and farmers in push to let prisoners out to work | Tasmania Prison Service Exposed | Scoop.it
CASH-STRAPPED local councils and farmers have called for prisoners to be put to work in regional areas, after new figures revealed a massive increase in the number of inmates being granted leave permits.
Miriam Scurrah's insight:

So much more could and should be done, let's see Ron Barwick empty every day (except for the ill and elderly).

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Fears plan could see more disabled people sent to jail

Fears plan could see more disabled people sent to jail | Tasmania Prison Service Exposed | Scoop.it
There are fears scrapping suspended sentences could see more people with a disability end up in jail.
Miriam Scurrah's insight:

People with a disability, mental illness or acquired brain injury were already over-represented in the prison system. Funding for prison rehabilitation programs is already inadequate, disjointed, insecure, lacking in strategic focus and not aligned to best practice. 

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Thank you George

I was in to visit my son for Fathers Day at Ron Barwick and I want to congratulate George (the officer on the gate) on his professionalism. Not only did he introduce himself with his full name, he also mentioned to be careful of all the bees in the garden. He asked if anyone was allergic and then told us all about what to do in the event of an emergency or incident during our visit. Thank you George, polite, respectful, informative and friendly. Congratulations for modelling pro social behaviour!

Miriam Scurrah's insight:

I was in to visit my son for Fathers Day at Ron Barwick and I want to congratulate George  (the officer on the gate) on his professionalism. Not only did he introduce himself with his full name, he also mentioned to be careful of all the bees in the garden. He asked if anyone was allergic and then told us all about what to do in the event of an emergency or incident during our visit. Thank you George, polite, respectful, informative and friendly. Congratulations for modelling pro social behaviour!

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2014-15 Tasmanian Budget: Prison spending

2013-14 Tasmanian Budget
Miriam Scurrah's insight:

Tasmanian Prison Service Funding
An operational base funding review of the Tasmanian Prison Service undertaken in 2013-14 identified that additional funding was required to operate the core services of the Prison. Funding of $4.7 million in 2014-15 has been provided with reduced amounts across the Forward Estimates to reflect anticipated
efficiencies, resulting from the ongoing change process, being achieved.

 

Prison Services budget for 2014-15 is 61 004 000. Forward estimates are 63 068 000 for 2015-16, 63 815 000 for 2016-17, and 64 450 000 for 2017-18.

 

The following performance targets were set:

Percentage of prisoners returning to corrective
services within two years of release as a percentage. Actual % achieved 2011-12 was 48.0%. In 2012- 13 it increased to 50.6%. This years target was set at 48%. Escape rates were set for open and closed prisons. In addition a Cost per Prisoner Day was set to $300 for this year. In 2011-12 the cost was $293.88 and in 2012-13 it was 321.24. 

 

Capital investment projects will continue to be funded for Launceston prison, Stage D and medium accommodation for $8 610 000. 

 

Construction of the facilities associated with the Prison Infrastructure Redevelopment Program - Stage D
commenced in 2012-13. Construction is expected to be completed during 2014. On completion, the new
facilities at the Risdon Prison Complex will include:
• a new activities and education centre for both maximum and medium-security prisoners;
• a new trade training centre;
• a new secure drug testing facility and an additional multi-purpose interview room;
• a new 10-bed maximum-security accommodation unit;
• a new purpose-built Tactical Response Group (TRG) Unit;
• major upgrades to the electronic security systems to allow the connection of these facilities and address critical stability and obsolescence issues; and
• other facility changes including larger exercise areas, a new vehicle lock and a new incident management facility.

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Prison waste water tests reveal jail drug use

Prison waste water tests reveal jail drug use | Tasmania Prison Service Exposed | Scoop.it
Waste water testing in prisons can help reveal the level and type of jail drug use, research shows.
Miriam Scurrah's insight:

Interesting research being conducted at UTas on drug use in the prison population.

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Our Victorian prisons have had their day - Telegraph

Our Victorian prisons have had their day - Telegraph | Tasmania Prison Service Exposed | Scoop.it
Inmates need to be treated as responsible adults, capable of changing their morals
Miriam Scurrah's insight:

UK article, but equally applicable to the Tasmanian experience

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Smoking Ban at Arthur Gorrie Correctional Centre Queensland criticised for violence against staff

Smoking Ban at Arthur Gorrie Correctional Centre Queensland criticised for violence against staff | Tasmania Prison Service Exposed | Scoop.it
The assault of a female prison officer at one of Queensland’s toughest jails has her union complaining of poor resources and anger over a prisoner smoking ban.
Miriam Scurrah's insight:

Smoking bans increase prison tensions and can ignite violence leading to increased safety risks for prisoners and prison staff.

 

"United Voice delegate Kylie Muscat said a smoking ban introduced on May 5 had escalated tensions at the prison.

“The smoking ban really set a match to what was already a volatile situation and we’ve seen several staff attacked by inmates since,” she said."

 

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The Government is pushing ahead with introducing smoking bans on Risdon ... - Herald Sun

The Government is pushing ahead with introducing smoking bans on Risdon ... - Herald Sun | Tasmania Prison Service Exposed | Scoop.it
The Government is pushing ahead with introducing smoking bans on Risdon ...
Miriam Scurrah's insight:

Prisoners are still waiting for promised reviews of the canteen list and prisoner pay system. A review of the canteen list was promised as part of the smoking bans. Prisoners have requested that a greater variety of art, craft, hobby and sporting equipment be available for them to purchase, to provide smokers with a greater range of activities other than smoking.

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Activists rally against laws

Activists rally against laws | Tasmania Prison Service Exposed | Scoop.it
ABOUT 1000 activists gathered in Hobart yesterday to protest against the state government's anti-protest laws currently before Parliament.
Miriam Scurrah's insight:

Mandatory sentencing for protesting will be a disaster for the government. Filling our prison up with activists...they will protest for the human rights of prisoners and expose the nature of our prisons - that I encourage, but not at the expense of additional people being imprisoned.

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Secrecy in government does not assist the democratic process

By only providing heavily redacted information the government tries to hide - this is something that Vanessa Goodwin knows all about as she suffered it whilst in opposition. Now she is using it for her own purposes. But it simply is not good for democracy - and it is completely unnecessary - a few months ago McKim had full disclosure as a Minister himself. It is simply not the way that governments should operate. We need greater transparency, not less.

 

Extract from the Hansard Tuesday 3 June 2014

JUSTICE - SUSPENDED SENTENCES

 

Mr McKIM to MINISTER for JUSTICE

 

[10.13 a.m.]

Your bizarre, ideologically driven policy to make our community more dangerous by abolishing suspended sentences and introducing mandatory imprisonment is opposed by the Law Society of Tasmania, the Australian Lawyers Alliance, community legal centres, the Tasmanian Law Reform Institute, a former Supreme Court judge and myriad other experts in this field.

 

Can you confirm the existence of a report inside the Department of Justice, a heavily redacted version of which I have obtained under a right to information request, which has found that in the 2012-13 financial year Tasmanian courts imposed 1 245 fully suspended sentences.  Doesn't this confirm that if you proceed with your ideologically driven policy we can expect nearly 1 300 new entrants to the Tasmanian prison population every year?  Can you also confirm the report contains what it describes as a 'worse case scenario assessment' of the impact of your bizarre policy on the Tasmanian prison population, as well as information on the impact of your bizarre policy on the courts?  Will you release this report publicly in full so that Tasmanians can understand the impact of your policies on access to justice and the prison population or do you intend to keep secret the true impact of your ideologically driven policy agenda?

 

ANSWER

 

Madam Speaker, I thank the member for his question.  He has a copy of that report, a version he obtained through the RPI process and it is most probably being dealt with through that process.

 

Mr McKim - That's about you.

 

Dr GOODWIN - Do you want to hear the answer to the question or not?

 

Mr McKim - Yes.

 

Madam SPEAKER - Order.  The Attorney-General is answering the question.

 

Dr GOODWIN - It is one of many questions you have asked me and I have answered that question, so I am aware of it.  It has been through the RPI process and you have a copy of the redacted version.  That is the answer to that question.

 

In our policy, which is described as bizarre, we are standing up for the community who have concerns -

 

Members interjecting.

 

Madam SPEAKER - Order.

 

Dr GOODWIN - I might add that the Labor government, many years before they did anything about suspended sentences or breach of -

 

Ms O'Connor - They should be ashamed.

 

Madam SPEAKER - Order.  The Attorney-General will resume her seat.  There are so many comments going on around the Chamber that I am finding it very difficult to hear the Attorney-General and it may be because there is a little bit of distance over there.  I ask members to hear the answer in silence, otherwise I will call on the next question if members are not interested in her answer. 

 

Dr GOODWIN - Thank you, Madam Speaker.  We will be implementing our policy but Mr McKim has not moved past the first part of the policy, which is to progressively phase out suspended sentences.  He obviously has not read the other bit, which is to phase in a range of alternative sentencing options.  If we were to abolish suspended sentences without phasing in other options, there will be an increase in the prison population but that is not our policy.

 

Mr McKim - Why won't you release the department's work in full?

 

Madam SPEAKER - Order.

 

Dr GOODWIN - You have a copy of the redacted version.

 

Mr McKim - Secrecy, lack of transparency, hiding from the Tasmanian people.

 

Madam SPEAKER - Order.

 

Dr GOODWIN - I am happy to give my answer to the question.

 

Members interjecting.

 

Madam SPEAKER - Order.  There is an argument across the Chamber and I will call on the next question.  The Attorney-General will wind up.

 

Dr GOODWIN - Madam Speaker, the short answer to this question is that we will be implementing our policy in full.  I encourage you to read the policy and then you might note that we will be consulting with the Sentencing Advisory Council on this.  I am looking forward to meeting professors Freiberg and Warner this week to start work on this policy to introduce a range of alternatives when we phase out suspended sentences.

 

Mr McKim - So you're not going to release the report?

 

Dr GOODWIN - You have a copy of it and I have answered that question.

 

Mr BARNETT - Point of order, Madam Speaker.  The member for Franklin, Mr McKim, continues interjecting unrelentingly across the Chamber and nobody can hear the answer from the Attorney-General.  He is acting in breach of Standing Orders and should be dealt with accordingly.

 

Madam SPEAKER - I do not need members' assistance.  I have been calling order and I will be issuing warnings if interjections do not cease.  The Attorney-General will sum up and then I will call on the next question.

 

Dr GOODWIN - I confirm that we will be implementing our policy to progressively phase out suspended sentences.  We will be consulting with the Sentencing Advisory Council and I encourage you to read our policy.

 

Mr McKim - Just keep it all secret.

Miriam Scurrah's insight:

By only providing heavily redacted information the government tries to hide - this is something that Vanessa Goodwin knows all about as she suffered it whilst in opposition. Now she is using it for her own purposes. But it simply is not good for democracy - and it is completely unnecessary - a few months ago McKim had full disclosure as a Minister himself. It is simply not the way that governments should operate. We need greater transparency, not less.

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Sentencing changes

CONGRATULATIONS to Attorney- General Vanessa Goodwin and the Tasmanian Liberals for postponing their decision to abolish suspended sentences.
Miriam Scurrah's insight:

All the evidence shows that investing in improving the lives of socially disadvantaged groups does much more to reduce offending than putting people in prison or imposing harsher penalties.

 

We hope that suspended sentences are not scrapped and that a range of viable alternatives can be implemented to complement suspended sentences. We need more sentencing options not less. 

 

Ideology driven public policy is doomed to failure. We need intelligent evidence based policy - throughout our criminal justice system rather than out dated and ideologically based retributive policies.

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18-month review for plans to scrap suspended jail terms

18-month review for plans to scrap suspended jail terms | Tasmania Prison Service Exposed | Scoop.it
The Government defends the length of time given for an inquiry into its plan to scrap suspended prison terms.
Miriam Scurrah's insight:

"Labor's human services spokeswoman Rebecca White said she doubted whether Ms Goodwin, who is a qualified criminologist, actually supported the policy. "It's not supported by a number of legal experts, and I'd be surprised if the Attorney-General truly support it herself. It's very unfortunate that they're progressing this issue."" AGREED.


And what are the alternatives, so far I think that most have already been rejected by this government? How will they be funded? Will they be implemented and operational before suspended sentences are scrapped? Sounds like a long time coming for something that no one wants. 


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Time for Tasmania to reduce imprisonment and discuss increasing the alternatives

Strategies for Reducing Imprisonment

Why reduce imprisonment? Put simply, because it is very expensive, it does little to reduce crime , does not improve public safety and it does not assist people to live as good citizens upon release.

 

The following is ideas and arguments come largely from a UK report ‘A Presumption against imprisonment’

 

Strategy 1: Greater Use of Diversion from the Courts

In those cases where a formal criminal justice response is necessary, more offenders could be diverted from prosecution. In particular, more of those committing non-serious offences could be dealt with outside the court system. The rationale for this is that:

i) the formal court system should be reserved for the more serious cases;

ii) it is essential to avoid the danger that persistent low-level offenders who go to court might easily ‘go through’ fines and community sentences and end up in prison.

Proposal: Introduce a presumption that low-level offenders be dealt with out of court

 

Strategy 2: Promoting Greater Use of Alternative Forms of Sentence

Proposal: Deal with more offenders by means of financial penalties and community-based sanctions rather than incarceration

The rationale for this proposal is:

i) It is disproportionate and wrong that many offenders are sent to prison not because of the seriousness of their crime but because courts have ‘run out of alternatives’. That suggests that their offences are not so serious as to justify imprisonment, but that there is a lack of imagination about alternative sanctions.

ii) In particular, persistent offenders whose crimes are not of high seriousness must be dealt with in the community. Many offenders are sent to prison because of their past records, even though the experience of prison is unlikely to improve them in any way.

iii) Financial penalties and non-custodial sentences are no less effective than prison in terms of reconviction rates, and often better.

Although it should be noted that a related, and we can hope also temporary, problem has been the considerable use of imprisonment for breach of suspended sentences, breach of community sentences and breach of the conditions of parole (for released prisoners).

 

Strategy 3: Prohibiting or Restricting the Imposition of Short Custodial Sentences

Proposal:

a) Prohibit courts from imposing prison sentences below a certain limit; or

b) Create a presumption against imposing such a sentence unless there are exceptional circumstances (instead, courts would be required to impose either a suspended custodial sentence or a community sentence).

This is particularly important in Tasmania where people serving less than a 6 month sentence are not provided with access to rehabilitation and reintegration services.

 

Strategy 4: Removing or Restricting the Sanction of Imprisonment for Certain Offences

Proposal: Remove imprisonment as the maximum penalty for certain offences, or whole categories of offence, altogether

For example, pure property offences such as theft, handling stolen goods and criminal damage should be dealt with proportionately, by means of financial sanctions (particularly compensation to the victim) and community sentences.

 

Strategy 5: Reviewing Sentence Lengths

Proposal: Review sentence lengths in relation to those of other countries with low imprisonment rates, including maximum penalties and mandatory minimum sentences, and sentences for murder and drug offences. The rationale for this is that people are becoming accustomed to ever-higher sentences, without stopping to reflect on the need for so much deprivation of liberty. One detailed task would be to examine the case for each mandatory minimum sentence. Questions should include: Is it disproportionate? Does it prevent the courts from doing justice in the individual case? And can it be argued that it has had a significant effect on the level of relevant offending?

 

Strategy 6: Removing Mentally Disordered and Addicted
Persons from Prisons

The removal of mentally disordered offenders and offenders with learning difficulties from the prisons has long been regarded as the right course. The rationale is obvious: prison is an unsuitable environment for such offenders, who should properly be treated or at least accommodated in appropriate facilities. This is therefore a question of justice, rather than merely a means of reducing the prison population.

Proposal: Remove mentally disordered offenders, offenders with learning difficulties and those suffering from drug or alcohol addiction from prison through investment in and transfer to more appropriate facilities, treatment and rehabilitation.

Proposal: Urgently review the case of each prisoner serving an indeterminate sentences and who has served the minimum term, with a view to release.

Miriam Scurrah's insight:

Six simple strategies to reduce imprisonment. It does not include scrapping suspended sentences as this would have the opposite effect. If you want to know how we can save $400 per prisoner per day and improve community safety, you need to read this.

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Putting prisoners to work on the land is a win-win for all of us

Putting prisoners to work on the land is a win-win for all of us | Tasmania Prison Service Exposed | Scoop.it
THERE’S a small group of Tasmanians, nearly all of them men, who would give their eyeteeth to quit what they are doing, get out into the bush, fix up some fences, clean up some fire hazards, do some exercise, get some vitamin D and pick up a life skill all at the same time.
Miriam Scurrah's insight:

Could not agree more.

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Disabled prisoners forced to work

On the outside, a disabled person is entitled to a disability pension and support from organisations who advocate for the rights of people with a disability. Medical assessments for entitlements are conducted by independent specialists.

 

On the inside, there is little if any support or understanding. Prisoners (some still on remand) who have a disability are routinely forced to work and the onus is on them to prove that they are unable to. Some prisoners report that not even a medical certificate seems to satisfy.

 

Disabled prisoners can contribute to the prison community, with appropriate assessment, support and training. But this is not the reality of prison life. It appears that there is no appropriate policy or procedure (or staff cannot apply such a policy in a consistent and professional manner) and no appropriately qualified and independent assessments are conducted to determine work capacity. Instead disabled prisoners report that they are assigned tasks which they cannot do and feel humiliated by the experience. 

 

We do not sentence people to 'hard labour'. People are sent to prison as punishment NOT for punishment. All prisoners have human rights, including the right to be treated with dignity.


It is time for an independent prison inspectorate...

Miriam Scurrah's insight:

On the outside, a disabled person is entitled to a disability pension and support from organisations who advocate for the rights of people with a disability. Medical assessments for entitlements are conducted by independent specialists.

 

On the inside, there is little if any support or understanding. Prisoners (some still on remand) who have a disability are routinely forced to work and the onus is on them to prove that they are unable to. Some prisoners report that not even a medical certificate seems to satisfy.

 

Disabled prisoners can contribute to the prison community, with appropriate assessment, support and training. But this is not the reality of prison life. It appears that there is no appropriate policy or procedure (or staff cannot apply such a policy in a consistent and professional manner) and no appropriately qualified and independent assessments are conducted to determine work capacity. Instead disabled prisoners report that they are assigned tasks which they cannot do and feel humiliated by the experience. 

 

We do not sentence people to 'hard labour'. People are sent to prison as punishment NOT for punishment. All prisoners have human rights, including the right to be treated with dignity.

 

It is time for an independent prison inspectorate...

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Better Outcomes from the Tasmanian Prison Service

Better Outcomes from the Tasmanian Prison Service | Tasmania Prison Service Exposed | Scoop.it
Miriam Scurrah's insight:

That is what we have been promised...and it is what we will expect to see. Still no mention of an Independent Prison Inspectorate, which had previously been called for by the government when Labor was in power. We still require transparent independent oversight of our prisons.

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Australia: Tasmanian budget cuts public sector jobs, wages

Australia: Tasmanian budget cuts public sector jobs, wages | Tasmania Prison Service Exposed | Scoop.it
Tasmania already has the worst poverty and unemployment levels of any Australian state.
Miriam Scurrah's insight:

Interesting analysis of the State budget. "As part of its “law and order” policies, the budget boosted prison spending, including allocating $16 million for wage increases for prison officers, who have been exempted from the public sector freeze."

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Retiring magistrate Don Jones rejects mandatory sentencing

Retiring magistrate Don Jones rejects mandatory sentencing | Tasmania Prison Service Exposed | Scoop.it
THE ability to sentence law breakers needs to stay in the court and not be taken away by political policies such as mandatory sentencing, retiring magistrate Don Jones says.
Miriam Scurrah's insight:

Another experienced person saying NO to mandatory sentencing. 

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Not at capacity

Prisons - SUSPENDED SENTENCES

 

Ms OGILVIE question to ATTORNEY-GENERAL, Dr GOODWIN

 

[10.44 a.m.]

Given the prison is currently running at close to capacity and given that your protest laws and your plan to abolish suspended sentences will see that figure grow, could you please tell us what modelling you have done to ensure the Prison system can cope?  Can we see the data please?

 

ANSWER

 

Madam Speaker, I thank the member for her question.  The Tasmanian Prison Service is not approaching capacity.  As at 18 August 2014, the Tasmanian Prison Service had a state wide prison utilisation rate of 76.2 per cent, excluding the watch house cells at the Hobart and Launceston reception.  As you would be aware, the prison population fluctuates on a daily basis.

 

In relation to our suspended sentence phasing-out policy, you would be aware we have referred that matter to the Sentencing Advisory Council.  The terms of reference are comprehensive and you can access them yourselves and see exactly what is planned in terms of what the Sentencing Advisory Council will be examining.  I do not propose to address any further matters on this.  You are aware that is out for consultation in terms of the Sentencing Advisory Council's work.  There will be ample opportunity for you to feed into that process and I would encourage you to embrace alternative sentencing options as you have pretended to do in the past.

 

Mr McKim - But you're going to remove them.

 

Madam SPEAKER - Order.

 

Dr GOODWIN - The Labor Party was terrific at promising lots of alternative sentencing options and delivering none of them, particularly home detention, something you promised over many years and never actually managed to deliver, so your track record on alternative sentencing options is pretty appalling.  The key message here is that the Tasmanian Prison Service is not approaching capacity and any suggestions to the contrary are just plain wrong.

Miriam Scurrah's insight:

From the House of Assembly on 19 August, a question of capacity was raised in relation to the implementation of suspended sentences.

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Phys ed for criminals plan to cost $285k

THE Hodgman Government is looking to spend up to $285,000 a year on phys ed at the prison

Miriam Scurrah's insight:

The article (fairly typical of The Advocates sensationalism) states

 

"The sport and recreation positions  were funded in the 2013-14 budget as part of the operational costs of new facilities being commissioned under the Prison Infrastructure Redevelopment Program.

 

Robert Williams said the construction project was nearing completion and more  appointments were anticipated for offender management, program and therapeutic staff. ''The Prison Infrastructure Redevelopment Program will provide additional prison facilities and deliver a vastly improved environment for both staff and prisoners,'' he said. ''Staff safety will be enhanced and prisoners will be offered access to a broader range of activities that reduce boredom, as well as complement and extend rehabilitation and work programs.'' He said they were  key issues identified in the Risdon Prison Complex Inquiry  undertaken by Mick Palmer in 2011."


Finally something is actually happening - it has taken 3 years to get here. Looking forward to seeing more progress - lets hope for a successful recruitment process and strong candidates. Let's also hope that they get the cooperation of all staff in implementing their programs (otherwise it will be a waste of money) - that relies on sufficient cultural change having occurred to be able to retain great staff and actually implement something on the ground.

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Dying in prison: ’Both sides of the fence’ study - Part 1

Dying in prison: ’Both sides of the fence’ study - Part 1 | Tasmania Prison Service Exposed | Scoop.it
Dr Marian Peacock, a Senior Research Associate at the International Observatory on End of Life Care, writes for ehospice about a unique study she is currently working on, based inside a prison in north west England.
Miriam Scurrah's insight:

Interesting research on managing ageing prison populations and the issues involved in housing older persons in a prison environment

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Prison doesn’t work – as the Glen Parva shambles shows

Prison doesn’t work – as the Glen Parva shambles shows | Tasmania Prison Service Exposed | Scoop.it
Owen Jones: First thoughts: Most of those locked up have problems that are not solved by incarceration. Society must find another way

Via britishroses
Miriam Scurrah's insight:

Lessons from the UK - prison doesn't work. This is what an independent prison inspectorate shows and that is why governments and some public servants don't want it. Because it shows the reality of prison, its dysfunction and its failure.

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Could fish oil be the answer to ADHD?

Could fish oil be the answer to ADHD? | Tasmania Prison Service Exposed | Scoop.it

hSchools would give out fish oil tablets, under the vision of a University of Wollongong researcher.

Miriam Scurrah's insight:

Not just fish on the menu, but fish oil tablets should be dispensed to all prisoners to assist in nutritional intake. The health benefits are well researched and to date research into fish oil and it's effect on behaviour has shown very positive results. Let's hope the research gets funding and actual policy is implemented as a result as well.

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Response from Vanessa Goodwin about pay and canteen issues

Response from Vanessa Goodwin about pay and canteen issues | Tasmania Prison Service Exposed | Scoop.it
Miriam Scurrah's insight:

Apparently no prisoners concerns and letters are left unanswered, contrary to what prisoners tell me (apparently it is only me 'alleging' a lack of action....clearly not really listening to prisoners, or maybe the problem is that they do not communicate to prisoners how to have their complaints actually officially recorded.

 

Of course, they are still reviewing everything, that's what breaking the cycle is all about - employing public servants to review their own procedures and policies endlessly without making any significant changes. The snail and the Tasmanian government move slowly.

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Released Occupy Activist Cecily McMillan: "There's No Sense in Prison"

Released Occupy Activist Cecily McMillan: "There's No Sense in Prison" | Tasmania Prison Service Exposed | Scoop.it
Released from Rikers prison after serving 58 days, Occupy activist Cecily McMillan discusses prisons, policing and why she'll keep protesting.
Miriam Scurrah's insight:

After reading this article the State Government should seriously reconsider their Bill supporting mandatory detention for protesters. You see protesters, will protest. They will spread their knowledge of prison life and expose the abuses of human rights which occur daily in our prisons. So putting people into prison for protesting is likely to increase the number of protests which occur inside prison, and then on their release, there will be protests outside prison. This will create a cycle, not break the cycle.

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