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Getting our Heads On Straight: Brand As Verb Principles (via stories)

80% of leaders say their brands offer a superior customer experience. Only 8% of customers agree. Meanwhile, marketers are tortured by the fact that the numb...

Via Karen Dietz
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Karen Dietz's curator insight, April 18, 2014 9:07 PM

I'm heading to Portland, OR soon for a conference of PR and branding professionals and the theme is Story. As I'm thinking about the conference, I found this SlideShare program and thing it's really great -- because it's all about how to think better about branding and its link to customer experiences that then generate stories.


As I've pointed out before, story has impacted branding in huge ways. But it takes awhile for old mind-sets to fully make the change. Me included! So it's always helpful to have a few reminders around like this piece.


All the principles here can be actualized using stories. That's good news! And the examples shared here are good too.


Happy branding!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

Morgan Newall's curator insight, April 21, 2014 6:07 AM
Why a Verb? Because nobody got time for you if you aint doing nuttin!
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Stories: On a Blog/In the Boardroom, Still the Most Powerful Way to Persuade

Stories: On a Blog/In the Boardroom, Still the Most Powerful Way to Persuade | Chummaa...therinjuppome! | Scoop.it
He'd been on the job just two short weeks. Two weeks at the most prestigious publication in his industry, and he was already on the brink of bringing The

Via Karen Dietz
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Karen Dietz's curator insight, November 18, 2013 6:23 PM

Author Jerod Morris of Copyblogger covers it all here quickly and succinctly:

  1. Why stories are so powerful
  2. The elements of a good story
  3. The elements for a remarkable story


And I really like this comment: 

"Stories about dying, mothers, and fighting for your ideasStories about snowboarding, subdural hematomas, and the secret of life.

Hell, even made-up stories about CEOs on ether trips shooting social media darlings with elephant tranquilizersThey persuade in different ways and for different goals. But they persuade."

The story elements he lists are:
  1. A hero (better to say 'protagonist' IMHO)
  2. A goal
  3. An obstacle
  4. A mentor (sometimes but not always)
  5. A moral


Even better, Morris includes examples of companies and their stories. Hooray! We like examples. Makes everything much more concrete. And they show us how we can apply Morris' advice to our own organizations.


Have fun checking out this article!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

Studer Education's curator insight, November 20, 2013 2:36 PM

Storytelling... It's all about relationships!

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Attract More Readers By Writing Posts They Already Crave

Attract More Readers By Writing Posts They Already Crave | Chummaa...therinjuppome! | Scoop.it

Marcus Sheridan of River Pools and Spas was featured in the New York Times. Why?

 

He went from spending over $250,000 a month on advertising and over drawing from the bank to making $1.7 million in sales from the first post alone. 

 

Here's how you write posts your readers crave.


Via Karen Dietz
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Karen Dietz's comment, September 4, 2013 3:10 PM
Hi Hans! Yes, I have used these techniques and they have helped me a lot. Just goes to show that storytelling is not the answer to every problem -- sometimes we need other tools to help us also. Using the tips in the article has allowed me to evoke more pointed stories from those I interview, leading to understanding my customers even better. Yeah!
Hein Holthuizen's curator insight, September 21, 2013 5:26 PM

will it work for you?

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Story Listening: Getting work done & making a difference -- K. Dietz TEDx talk

Karen Dietz, owner of Just Story It, shares her recent TEDx talk on how to listen for stories that will help you/your business/your nonprofit make a difference in the world.


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Karen Dietz's curator insight, November 30, 2013 3:48 PM

Hi Folks!


Many people have been asking me when my TEDx talk will be available and it's finally be posted for viewing.


During the presentation I not only talk a bit about my background and lessons I've learned about storytelling, but I also share a simply story listening process I learned years ago from storyteller Doug Lipman.


I use the process all the time in my work -- because it's so powerful, and because it is at the root of how work gets done, and how making a difference in the world really happens. Anyone can do this process and I encourage you to try it out.


I hope you enjoy this 15 minutes and begin to relate to stories in this way. Happy story listening!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, December 2, 2013 1:25 PM

Inspiration on how to J"ust Story it" from the professional founder.

Karen Dietz's comment, December 2, 2013 2:04 PM
Thank you Monica!
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Back Stories! A Small Business Shows The Advantages of Offering Facility Tours

Back Stories! A Small Business Shows The Advantages of Offering Facility Tours | Chummaa...therinjuppome! | Scoop.it
Facility tours are a powerful marketing tool for the right kind of small business. Using technology to enhance the tour experience can add impact.

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Karen Dietz's curator insight, October 11, 2013 10:15 PM

What a great article about how a brewery hit gold by offering tours of its facilities. This is a great way to tell a company's back story. What I like about what author Anita Campbell shares is the challenges they faced in telling their story and the successes they've had (sold out tours and a #2 national ranking + increases in revenue). 


What's a back story?? These are stories you share about the behind-the scenes of your business: how products are created, how employees serve customers, the inside scoop of sales calls, stories about your supply chain, and the like


But this doesn't have to apply only to manufacturing sites! With videos and SlideShare (just to name two tools), any business can share its back stories with the world.


So get busy. And I bet you start exerpiencing similar results as Allagash Brewing Company!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for the Just Story It curation on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

malek's curator insight, October 12, 2013 10:02 AM

Teach me, I know nothing

Show me, I learn everything

Maria Elena Leta's curator insight, October 13, 2013 1:57 PM

I'm a beerlover too and this is definitely the kind of marketing deserving a lot of claps.

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The Identifiable Victim Effect and How It Affects Your Storytelling

The Identifiable Victim Effect and How It Affects Your Storytelling | Chummaa...therinjuppome! | Scoop.it
To use the identifiable victim effect in marketing, we first need to understand the psychological underpinnings of this quirk. Let's explore, shall we?

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Carol Sanford's curator insight, June 27, 2013 4:01 PM

This is related to the brain's need to connect the absract and concrete. Innovation, learning and thinking anything new,  are all made possible by having an idea and making sense of it in our real lives. Storytelling is the same. The ideas in it need to be connected to concreteness, therefor a name, for it to 'sink in'.

Karen Dietz's comment, June 29, 2013 3:03 PM
So true Carol! I very much appreciate the comment and insight.
Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s curator insight, June 29, 2013 7:13 PM

If a concept is too big, we can become overwhelmed.  It's easier to see how we could help one person, but it can be hard to see how we could help dozens, thousands, or millions.

 

Fellow curator Karen Deitz's comments (see below) summed up this article beautifully.

"One of the biggest mistakes I see that corporations, non-profits, and individuals make when sharing their business stories is they talk about 'a person' or 'a group' without giving them names and characteristics. In other words, whoever they are talking about are not identifiable.

 

If we don't have a name to hang on to, we can't connect. We want to connect with people. Without a name, 'a person' or 'a group' is just a concept."