Talks
88.4K views | +1 today
Follow
Talks
Online talks related to complex systems
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Complexity Digest
Scoop.it!

▶ Chaos, Complexity, and Public Policy

Irene Sanders Executive Director and Founder of the Washington Center for Complexity and Public Policy and author of "Strategic Thinking and the New Science: Planning in the Midst of Chaos, Complexity, and Change."


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KXxs-JtvkkQ

more...
Eli Levine's curator insight, February 11, 2014 2:09 PM

A way cool panel discussion.  I wish I could be a full practitioner of this new, empirically based governing and political strategic thinking.

Liz Rykert's curator insight, February 12, 2014 10:34 AM

Loving these new video resources for understanding complexity and it applications.

Luciano Lampi's curator insight, March 23, 2014 9:16 PM

are our politicians aware of these concepts?

Scooped by Complexity Digest
Scoop.it!

As work gets more complex, 6 rules to simplify

Why do people feel so miserable and disengaged at work? Because today's businesses are increasingly and dizzyingly complex -- and traditional pillars of management are obsolete, says Yves Morieux. So, he says, it falls to individual employees to navigate the rabbit's warren of interdependencies. In this energetic talk, Morieux offers six rules for "smart simplicity." (Rule One: Understand what your colleagues actually do.)


http://www.ted.com/talks/yves_morieux_as_work_gets_more_complex_6_rules_to_simplify.html

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Complexity Digest from Peer2Politics
Scoop.it!

▶ Seven Complex Lessons in Education - Edgar Morin

Dr. Edgar Morin, an eminent sociologist and philosopher, discusses his work on Seven Complex Lessons in Education for the Future, addressing themes related to knowledge, identity and shared global challenges.


Via jean lievens
more...
Corina Ciechanow's curator insight, February 14, 2014 4:45 AM

'Il faut enseigner à la bienveillance' Teaching people how to show kindness, see all aspects of others to understand them. Great interview!

Scooped by Complexity Digest
Scoop.it!

Puppies! Now that I’ve got your attention, complexity theory

Animal behavior isn't complicated, but it is complex. Nicolas Perony studies how individual animals -- be they Scottish Terriers, bats or meerkats -- follow simple rules that, collectively, create larger patterns of behavior. And how this complexity born of simplicity can help them adapt to new circumstances, as they arise.


http://www.ted.com/talks/nicolas_perony_puppies_now_that_i_ve_got_your_attention_complexity_theory.html

more...
António F Fonseca's curator insight, February 4, 2014 9:40 AM

The guy seems to be confessing some obscure personal sin but the talk is very interesting.

Scooped by Complexity Digest
Scoop.it!

Why massive open online courses (still) matter

2013 was a year of hype for MOOCs (massive open online courses). Great big numbers and great big hopes were followed by some disappointing first results. But the head of edX, Anant Agarwal, makes the case that MOOCs still matter -- as a way to share high-level learning widely and supplement (but perhaps not replace) traditional classrooms. Agarwal shares his vision of blended learning, where teachers create the ideal learning experience for 21st century students.


http://www.ted.com/talks/anant_agarwal_why_massively_open_online_courses_still_matter.html

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Complexity Digest from Complexity & Systems
Scoop.it!

Big Brains. Small Films. Benoît Mandelbrot, The Father of Fractals | IBM

IBM and http://IBMblr.Tumblr.com celebrate the life of Benoit B. Mandelbrot, IBM Fellow Emeritus and Fractal Pioneer. In this final interview shot by filmmaker Erol Morris, Mandelbrot shares his love for mathematics and how it led him to his wondrous discovery of fractals. His work lives on today in many innovations in science, design, telecommunications, medicine, renewable energy, film (special effects), gaming (computer graphics) and more.


Via Bernard Ryefield
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Complexity Digest
Scoop.it!

Marco Annunziata: Welcome to the age of the industrial internet

Everyone's talking about the "Internet of Things," but what exactly does that mean for our future? In this thoughtful talk, economist Marco Annunziata looks at how technology is transforming the industrial sector, creating machines that can see, feel, sense and react -- so they can be operated far more efficiently. Think: airplane parts that send an alert when they need to be serviced, or wind turbines that communicate with one another to generate more electricity. It's a future with exciting implications for us all.


http://www.ted.com/talks/marco_annunziata_welcome_to_the_age_of_the_industrial_internet.html

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Complexity Digest
Scoop.it!

Suzana Herculano-Houzel: What is so special about the human brain?

The human brain is puzzling -- it is curiously large given the size of our bodies, uses a tremendous amount of energy for its weight and has a bizarrely dense cerebral cortex. But: why? Neuroscientist Suzana Herculano-Houzel puts on her detective's cap and leads us through this mystery. By making "brain soup," she arrives at a startling conclusion.


http://www.ted.com/talks/suzana_herculano_houzel_what_is_so_special_about_the_human_brain.html 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Complexity Digest
Scoop.it!

Jared Diamond: How societies can grow old better

There's an irony behind the latest efforts to extend human life: It's no picnic to be an old person in a youth-oriented society. Older people can become isolated, lacking meaningful work and low on funds. In this intriguing talk, Jared Diamond looks at how many different societies treat their elders -- some better, some worse -- and suggests we all take advantage of experience.


Jared Diamond: How societies can grow old better

http://www.ted.com/talks/jared_diamond_how_societies_can_grow_old_better.html

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Complexity Digest
Scoop.it!

Rodrigo Canales: The deadly genius of drug cartels | Video on TED.com

Up to 100,000 people died in drug-related violence in Mexico in the last 6 years. We might think this has nothing to do with us, but in fact we are all complicit, says Yale professor Rodrigo Canales in this unflinching talk that turns conventional wisdom about drug cartels on its head. The carnage is not about faceless, ignorant goons mindlessly killing each other but is rather the result of some seriously sophisticated brand management.

 

http://www.ted.com/talks/rodrigo_canales_the_deadly_genius_of_drug_cartels.html

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Complexity Digest from Étoile Platform
Scoop.it!

The magic of Fibonacci numbers

Math is logical, functional and just ... awesome. Mathemagician Arthur Benjamin explores hidden properties of that weird and wonderful set of numbers, the Fibonacci series. (And reminds you that mathematics can be inspiring, too!

Via Jorge Louçã
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Complexity Digest
Scoop.it!

Murray Gell-Mann on what it means to think like a scientist

Murray Gell-Mann on what it means to think like a scientist | Talks | Scoop.it

In a wide ranging radio interview, SFI Distinguished Fellow Murray Gell-Mann discusses what it means to think like a scientist, the value of rejecting orthodoxy, beauty and simplicity, reductionism vs. interdisciplinarity, complex systems science and theory, and intelligent life on other planets, among other topics.

 

http://www.santafe.edu/news/item/ksfr-gell-mann-science-life/

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Complexity Digest
Scoop.it!

Peter Csermely: Modular evolution and adaptation in complex systems

ECCO/GBI seminar: Modular evolution and adaptation in complex systems

 

Prof. Peter Csermely (LINK-Group, Semmelweis University, Department of Medical Chemistry csermely.peter@med.semmelweis-univ.hu)

 

Abstract: Our multidisciplinary group (www.linkgroup.hu) uses networks as 'highways' making the transfer of concepts between various disciplines. This allows the utilization of the 'wisdom' of biological systems surviving crisis events for many billions of years. The community structure of the protein-protein interaction network of yeast cells became more condensed upon stress. However, vital inter-community bridges were maintained and novel inter-community bridges were formed (PLoS Comput. Biol. 7, e1002187). Community reorganization emerged as general and novel systems level way of cost-efficient adaptation and evolution. Inter-community, highly dynamic 'creative nodes' not only determine the systems potential for fast adaptation, but also serve as a 'life insurance' in crisis. This is highly similar of the role of creative, gifted people in society. Creative transitions are served by an increased flexibility of the complex system. In other words: flexibility-increase increases the learning potential of the system. However, an 'over-flexible' system will not have a memory, and will unable to keep changes. An increase in system rigidity increases the memory storing ability of the system. Alternating changes of flexibility and rigidity emerge as a highly efficient optimization strategy of evolutionary changes.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nDzC83rbivI

more...
Scooped by Complexity Digest
Scoop.it!

Anne Milgram: Why smart statistics are the key to fighting crime

Anne Milgram: Why smart statistics are the key to fighting crime | Talks | Scoop.it

When she became the attorney general of New Jersey in 2007, Anne Milgram quickly discovered a few startling facts: not only did her team not really know who they were putting in jail, but they had no way of understanding if their decisions were actually making the public safer. And so began her ongoing, inspirational quest to bring data analytics and statistical analysis to the US criminal justice system.


http://new.ted.com/talks/anne_milgram_why_smart_statistics_are_the_key_to_fighting_crime

more...
Tom Cockburn's curator insight, July 17, 2014 4:15 AM

Will they incarcerate more  and add to overcrowding in jails  or end up targetting the same social and ethnic groups,or add  some social policies to reduce  the inclination to commit crime? Knowing what to do with the stats is critical as well as accessing the data.

Scooped by Complexity Digest
Scoop.it!

Opening up open data: An interview with Tim O’Reilly

Opening up open data: An interview with Tim O’Reilly | Talks | Scoop.it

We’re increasingly living in a world of black boxes. We don’t understand the way things work. And open-source software, open data are critical tools. We see this in the field of computer security. People say, “Well, we have to keep this secret.” Well, it turns out that the strongest security protocols are those that are secure even when people know how they work.
Secrecy is actually, it turns out, a fairly weak way of being secure. And I think in a similar way, we have to understand who owns the rules, how are they driven, how are they guiding our behavior. And there may be cases where you say, “Well, actually it’s a reasonable trade-off to have some degree of secrecy.”
We have this with trade secrets all the time in the commercial world. But there are other areas where we should say, “No, we really need to know how this works.”


http://www.mckinsey.com/insights/business_technology/opening_up_open_data_an_interview_with_tim_o_reilly

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Complexity Digest from Decision Intelligence
Scoop.it!

Introduction to Complex Systems: Patterns in Nature

This video provides a basic introduction to the science of complex systems, focusing on patterns in nature. (For more information on agent-based modeling, visit http://imaginationtoolbox.org ).


Via Lorien Pratt
more...
António F Fonseca's curator insight, February 1, 2014 4:50 AM

Agent based modeling still is the best tool to understand complex systems when mathematical modeling gets very complicated.

Liz Rykert's curator insight, February 10, 2014 7:25 PM

Always looking for good resources to introduce complexity science to others. This looks great. 

Ian Biggs, FAIPM, CPPE's curator insight, April 16, 2014 8:08 PM

I recently conducted a series of workshops on the subject of 'Complex Project Management - Navigating through the unknown'. This clip provides a great introduction to complex systems and for those interested in Complexity Science, this clip is worth 7:52 of your time.

Scooped by Complexity Digest
Scoop.it!

Initial Conditions

Initial Conditions | Talks | Scoop.it

What better way can there be to discuss the nature of time than sitting down with two eminent theoretical physicists in the timeless beauty of Vieques, at the western end of the Spanish Virgin Islands? Alan Guth, who first proposed the theory of cosmic inflation, and Sean Carroll, cosmologist and popular science communicator (and also a member of the board of Nautilus), are currently working together, in collaboration with Caltech grad student Chien-Yao Tseng, on a paper explaining the arrow of time. Watch as they walk us through some of the basic ideas.


http://nautil.us/issue/9/time/initial-conditions

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Complexity Digest
Scoop.it!

▶ Francis Heylighen: Return to Eden? (...) on the Road to an Omnipotent Global Intelligence

The concept of Singularity envisages a technology-driven explosion in intelligence. I argue that the resulting suprahuman intelligence will not be centralized in a single AI system, but distributed across all people and artifacts, as connected via the Internet. This global brain will function to tackle all challenges confronting the "global superorganism". Its capabilities will extend so far beyond our present abilities that they may be best conveyed as a pragmatic version of the "divine" attributes: omniscience (knowing everything needed to solve our problems), omnipresence (being available anywhere anytime), omnipotence (being able to provide any product or service at negligible cost) and omnibenevolence (aiming at the greatest happiness for the greatest number). By extrapolating present trends, technologies and evolutionary mechanisms, I argue that these abilities are likely to be realized within the next few decades. The resulting solution to all our individual and societal problems can be seen as a return to "Eden", the idyllic state of abundance and peace that supposedly existed before civilization. In this utopian society, individuals would be supported and challenged by the global brain to maximally develop their abilities, and to continuously create new knowledge. However, side effects of technological innovation are likely to create serious disturbances on the road to this utopia. The most important dangers are cascading failures facilitated by hyperconnectivity, the spread of psychological parasites that make people lose touch with reality, the loss of human abilities caused by an unnatural, passive lifestyle, and a conservative backlash triggered by too rapid changes. Because of the non-linearity of the system, the precise impact of such disturbances cannot be predicted. However, a range of precautionary measures, including a "global immune system", may pre-empt the greatest risks.


Return to Eden?
Promises and Perils on the Road to an Omnipotent Global Intelligence
Prof. Dr. Francis Heylighen

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nWJA_i-cY30

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Complexity Digest
Scoop.it!

Next civilization: countering complexity and extreme events

Dirk Helbing Next civilization: countering complexity and extreme events. TEDx Martigny 2013/09/26
more...
António F Fonseca's curator insight, January 17, 2014 4:44 PM

You should listen to this somehow strange speach, strange, perhaps exotic, but very wise and visionary.

John Symons's comment, January 19, 2014 1:58 PM
Dirk needs to read Oskar Morgenstern.
Scooped by Complexity Digest
Scoop.it!

Enrique Peñalosa: Why buses represent democracy in action

"An advanced city is not one where even the poor use cars, but rather one where even the rich use public transport," argues Enrique Peñalosa. In this spirited talk, the former mayor of Bogotá shares some of the tactics he used to change the transportation dynamic in the Colombian capital... and suggests ways to think about building smart cities of the future.


http://www.ted.com/talks/enrique_penalosa_why_buses_represent_democracy_in_action.html

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Complexity Digest from Non-Equilibrium Social Science
Scoop.it!

What Big Data Means For Social Science

We've known big data has had big impacts in business, and in lots of prediction tasks. I want to understand, what does big data mean for what we do for science? Specifically, I want to think about the following context:  You have a scientist who has a hypothesis that they would like to test, and I want to think about how the testing of that hypothesis might change as data gets bigger and bigger. So that's going to be the rule of the game. Scientists start with a hypothesis and they want to test it; what's going to happen?

 


Via Alessandro Cerboni, NESS
more...
Rescooped by Complexity Digest from From Complexity to Wisdom
Scoop.it!

Simon Sinek: Why Leaders Eat Last

Simon Sinek: Why Leaders Eat Last | Talks | Scoop.it
Ethnographer and leadership expert Simon Sinek on why leaders must sacrifice for the good of the group.

Via Erika Harrison
more...
Erika Harrison's curator insight, November 24, 2013 11:26 PM

"In this in-depth talk, ethnographer and leadership expert Simon Sinek reveals the hidden dynamics that inspire leadership and trust. In biological terms, leaders get the first pick of food and other spoils, but at a cost. When danger is present, the group expects the leader to mitigate all threats even at the expense of their personal well-being. Understanding this deep-seated expectation is the key difference between someone who is just an “authority” versus a true “leader.” 

Scooped by Complexity Digest
Scoop.it!

The "Homo Socialis" and Its Implications

Dirk Helbing, ETH Zürich.

http://vimeo.com/78344377

more...
Claude Emond's curator insight, January 20, 2014 5:55 PM

Can we be Homo Socialis without being also Homo Agilis ??? :)

Scooped by Complexity Digest
Scoop.it!

Dirk Helbing: A Planetary Nervous System, and What to Do with It

10th ECCO / GBI seminar series (2013-2014) A Planetary Nervous System, and What to Do with It Part I - Seminar October 24, 2013, Brussels

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Complexity Digest
Scoop.it!

Stephanie Forrest on complexity and the biology of computation

Stephanie Forrest on complexity and the biology of computation | Talks | Scoop.it

In a series of three lectures over three nights September 10-12, 2013 in Santa Fe, SFI’s Stephanie Forrest revealed surprising commonalities between computers and networks and organisms and ecosystems, then described new research that blurs the distinction further. 

 

http://www.santafe.edu/news/item/ulam-lectures-forrest-announce/

more...
Mark Waser's curator insight, October 12, 2013 3:08 PM

From the first lecture describing what software *really* is, through a critical new view of computer security, to modelling the ecology of humans and all of their systems, this series is a gentle introduction to many of the important profundities of modern computer-impacted life.