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The magic of Fibonacci numbers

Math is logical, functional and just ... awesome. Mathemagician Arthur Benjamin explores hidden properties of that weird and wonderful set of numbers, the Fibonacci series. (And reminds you that mathematics can be inspiring, too!

Via Jorge Louçã
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Why we need to end the War on Drugs

Is the War on Drugs doing more harm than good? In a bold talk, drug policy reformist Ethan Nadelmann makes an impassioned plea to end the "backward, heartless, disastrous" movement to stamp out the drug trade. He gives two big reasons we should focus on intelligent regulation instead.


http://go.ted.com/xgv

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Four Classes of Morphogenetic Collective Systems

Collective Dynamics of Complex Systems Research Group Seminar Series October 22, 2014 Hiroki Sayama (Bioengineering/Systems Science, Binghamton University) "Four…

Via Hiroki Sayama
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The hidden beauty of pollination - Louie Schwartzberg

The hidden beauty of pollination - Louie Schwartzberg | Talks | Scoop.it

Pollination: it's vital to life on Earth but largely unseen by the human eye. Filmmaker Louie Schwartzberg shows us the intricate world of pollen and pollinators with gorgeous high-speed images from his film "Wings of Life," inspired by the vanishing of one of nature's primary pollinators, the honeybee.


http://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-hidden-beauty-of-pollination-louie-schwartzberg

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▶ Creating a Planetary Nervous System as a Citizen Web

This video has been presented at the Ubicomp 2014
Workshop on „The superorganism of massive collective wearables"
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Eli Levine's curator insight, September 19, 9:26 AM

Interesting concept. I wonder if we already have this via the Internet. At any rate, I doubt that we'll be able to get it up and running in time to save anyone or anything. 

 

Nice thoughts. But nice thoughts don't really mean anything here in this universe. 

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▶ Self-organizing Intelligent Network of UAVs - YouTube

This video explains our research on autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). The research team at the Alpen-Adria University and Lakeside Labs developing a multi-UAV system by four key components: 
- the multiple UAV platforms,


http://youtu.be/QX2UPkd6yIc

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Dead stuff: The secret ingredient in our food chain - John C. Moore

Dead stuff: The secret ingredient in our food chain - John C. Moore | Talks | Scoop.it
When you picture the lowest levels of the food chain, you might imagine
herbivores happily munching on lush, living green plants. But this
idyllic image leaves out a huge (and slightly less appetizing) source of
nourishment: dead stuff. John C. Moore details the "brown food chain,"
explaining how such unlikely delicacies as pond scum and animal poop
contribute enormous amounts of energy to our ecosystems.

Via Eric L Berlow
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Eric L Berlow's curator insight, August 31, 12:20 PM

This is the first lesson in our Ecology Series in collaboration with TED Ed . The series focuses on networks in ecology. This one by John Moore explores the wonderful world of detritus. Most of us know that nature 'recycles' dead parts - but this lesson highlights that when you scale this process to the entire ecosystem, dead stuff, and 'brown' food chains, are an unexpectedly huge source of energy that fuels most ecosystems. 

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A Magna Carta for the web

A Magna Carta for the web | Talks | Scoop.it

Sir Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web 25 years ago. So it’s worth a listen when he warns us: There’s a battle ahead. Eroding net neutrality, filter bubbles and centralizing corporate control all threaten the web’s wide-open spaces. It’s up to users to fight for the right to access and openness. The question is, What kind of Internet do we want?


http://on.ted.com/h0Pgm

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Interview: Prof Geoffrey West on complexity science

CLC interviewed Prof. Geoffrey West, Distinguished Professor and Past President of Sante Fe Institute, at the World Cities Summit 2014 on the study of cities in relation to complexity science....

Via Roger D. Jones, PhD
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▶ Global Brain: Web as Self-organizing Distributed Intelligence - Francis Heylighen

Distributed intelligence is an ability to solve problems and process information that is not localized inside a single person or computer, but that emerges from the coordinated interactions between a large number of people and their technological extensions. The Internet and in particular the World-Wide Web form a nearly ideal substrate for the emergence of a distributed intelligence that spans the planet, integrating the knowledge, skills and intuitions of billions of people supported by billions of information-processing devices. This intelligence becomes increasingly powerful through a process of self-organization in which people and devices selectively reinforce useful links, while rejecting useless ones. This process can be modeled mathematically and computationally by representing individuals and devices as agents, connected by a weighted directed network along which "challenges" propagate. Challenges represent problems, opportunities or questions that must be processed by the agents to extract benefits and avoid penalties. Link weights are increased whenever agents extract benefit from the challenges propagated along it. My research group is developing such a large-scale simulation environment in order to better understand how the web may boost our collective intelligence. The anticipated outcome of that process is a "global brain", i.e. a nervous system for the planet that would be able to tackle both global and personal problems.


Summer School in cognitive Science: Web Science and the Mind
Institut des sciences cognitives, UQAM, Montréal, Canada
http://www.summer14.isc.uqam.ca/


http://www.isc.uqam.ca/

;

FRANCIS HEYLIGHEN, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, ECCO - Evolution, Complexity and Cognition research group






Towards a Global Brain: the Web as a Self-organizing, Distributed Intelligence

http://youtu.be/w2sznrVtiLg

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Tom Cockburn's curator insight, July 17, 4:06 AM

Apart from outraging some religious groups and upsetting some neo- luddites,this sounds interesting,provided we have some checks and balances/ failsafe options too

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The Fascinating World of Complex Systems

Part 1:             http://www.multimedia.ethz.ch/campus/zurichmeetsny/?doi=10.3930/ETHZ/AV-80b92958-97b0-4ad7-b07f-b15192931efc&autostart=false
 
Part 2:             http://www.multimedia.ethz.ch/campus/zurichmeetsny/?doi=10.3930/ETHZ/AV-1db36e67-b2d7-4229-8973-ef1bb54dde27&autostart=false
  
http://www.complexsys.org/publicprograms.html

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june holley's curator insight, July 9, 8:40 AM

Videos on complex systems.

Tom Cockburn's curator insight, July 17, 4:07 AM

Interesting

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▶ Dirk Helbing: How to Create a Better World - YouTube

It probably started with Linux, then came Wikipedia and Open Street Map. Crowd-sourced information systems are central for the Digital Society to thrive. So, what's next? I will introduce a number of concepts such as the Planetary Nervous System, Global Participatory Platform, Interactive Virtual Worlds, User-Controlled Information Filters and Reputation Systems, and the Digital Data Purse. I will also introduce ideas such as the Social Mirror, Intercultural Adapter, the Social Protector and Social Money as tools to create a better world. These can help us to avoid systemic instabilities, market failures, tragedies of the commons, and exploitation, and to create the framework for a Participatory Market Society, where everyone can be better off.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I_Lphxknozc

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Managing Complex Systems Based on Self-Regulation

Managing Complex Systems Based on Self-Regulation. Dirk Helbing, ETH Zurich. 2014/05/20


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eaD6xPM3AJI&index=2&list=UUYrlsSzinJN42rKmFlOOYxA

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Eli Levine's curator insight, June 9, 9:30 AM

It's also important to remember that complex systems are frequently larger than the observed and observable universe, such that there may be factors which create self-regulated systems.  A government is apart of the same social system as an economy and, through SOME forms of oversight and regulation can overcome the "boom and bust" cycles of the laissez-faire operated economy.  It's a question of honestly coordinating with the private companies, especially in the financial field, in order to get the best outcomes that they wouldn't really do on their own for the sake of small "self" and short term profit that does not consider social and environmental factors.  Yes, it may seem redundant and silly at times.  But it seems that the background noise of a system, the static, plays as important a role in producing the ultimate sound that is achieved within the social system as does the actual sound of the system itself.  You have to oversee the background noise as well as the main tune in order to achieve the clearest and most consistent sound according to our own social logics and our own social tastes.

 

Economically, it's technically all the same stuff.  Economics is much more of a technical field than foreign policy, which is also more technical than social policy.  All three play a role in producing optimal well being within a given society and in all three there are better and worse options for handling things.  It's as if economics gives the architecture and structure of the society itself through its interaction with the natural laws of economic physics and government/corporate policy (the structure of a house, for example), while social policy is the decoration of the house, internally and externally, while foreign policy is how your society interacts with its neighbors.  Within each house is a variety of different people, and they together form the basis of the social family within the given government's jurisdiction.  Politics, history and the outcomes of the economic, social and foreign policies influences the internal dynamics amongst the neighbors, thus giving life to the house that is intangible, yet very much apart of the universe, for better and for worse.  While there are no right or wrong answers, per se, there are definitely better and worse options that are available with regards to how things play out in the empirical world.  Some people's brains are better at sensing how the empirical world actually works and are able to perceive and willing to work with the natural laws of the universe, rather than trying to go their own way and, essentially, attempt to fly in the face of the impossible and hold out for the extremely improbable without having alternatives available to follow through on.  There is no freedom in this universe; you either obey the natural laws and physics, both inside of and outside of our social worlds, or else you're driven off and/or die.  I do not know how it is that people still go for the technically impossible or suboptimal for the sake of a belief, ideology or inkling within their brains that does not match the way the universe actually works.

 

Think about it.

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The state of the climate — and what we might do about it

The state of the climate — and what we might do about it | Talks | Scoop.it
How can we begin to address the global, insidious problem of climate change — a problem that’s too big for any one country to solve? Economist Nicholas Stern lays out a plan, presented to the UN’s Climate Summit in 2014, showing how the world’s countries can work together on climate. It’s a big vision for cooperation, with a payoff that goes far beyond averting disaster. He asks: How can we use this crisis to spur better lives for all?
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▶ Dirk Helbing: Bye bye Homo Economicus

Presented at the "Controversies in Game Theory: Homo Oeconomicus vs. Homo Socialis" Workshop @ ETH Zürich, September 2014 http://www.soms.ethz.ch/Workshop2014

You can find the Q&A here http://youtu.be/o7z57FzCcyk
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António F Fonseca's curator insight, October 22, 5:36 AM

Nice multi-agent experiment showing the emergence of friendliness and the thinking on mode other's, after all a human advantage, neurocientist explain it by mirror neurons. Is the ultimate reason for the existence of Facebook and such.

Bill Aukett's curator insight, October 31, 9:39 PM

The audio quality is a bit rough but the content is worth persevering with

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Towards a Global Systems Science

Dirk Helbing, ETH Zurich


Talk given at the European Conference on Complex Systems 2014 in Lucca, Italy


http://youtu.be/UHp0lV6ppQQ
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What's the next window into our universe?

What's the next window into our universe? | Talks | Scoop.it

Big Data is everywhere — even the skies. In an informative talk, astronomer Andrew Connolly shows how large amounts of data are being collected about our universe, recording it in its ever-changing moods. Just how do scientists capture so many images at scale? It starts with a giant telescope …


http://on.ted.com/c0RGN

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Complex network theory and the brain

Complex network theory and the brain | Talks | Scoop.it

We have known for at least 100 years that a brain is organized as a network of connections between nerve cells. But in the last 10 years there has been a rapid growth in our capacity to quantify the complex topological pattern of brain connectivity, using mathematical tools drawn from graph theory.
Here we bring together articles and reviews from some of the world’s leading experts in contemporary brain network analysis by graph theory. The contributions are focused on three big questions that seem important at this stage in the scientific evolution of the field: How does the topology of a brain network relate to its physical embedding in anatomical space and its biological costs? How does brain network topology constrain brain dynamics and function? And what seem likely to be important future methodological developments in the application of graph theory to analysis of brain networks?
Clearer understanding of the principles of brain network organization is fundamental to understanding many aspects of cognitive function, brain development and clinical brain disorders. We hope this issue provides a forward-looking window on this fast moving field and captures some of the excitement of recent progress in applying the concepts of graph theory to measuring and modeling the complexity of brain networks.


Complex network theory and the brain
Issue compiled and edited by David Papo, Javier M. Buldú, Stefano Boccaletti and Edward T. Bullmore

http://rstb.royalsocietypublishing.org/site/2014/network.xhtml

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Can we prevent the end of the world?

Can we prevent the end of the world? | Talks | Scoop.it

A post-apocalyptic Earth, emptied of humans, seems like the stuff of science fiction TV and movies. But in this short, surprising talk, Lord Martin Rees asks us to think about our real existential risks — natural and human-made threats that could wipe out humanity. As a concerned member of the human race, he asks: What’s the worst thing that could possibly happen?


http://on.ted.com/s04PN

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The World after Big Data: Building the Self-Regulating Society

The World after Big Data: Building the Self-Regulating Society. Dirk Helbing, ETH Zurich.
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What humans can learn from semi-intelligent slime

What humans can learn from semi-intelligent slime | Talks | Scoop.it

Inspired by biological design and self-organizing systems, artist Heather Barnett co-creates with physarum polycephalum, a eukaryotic microorganism that lives in cool, moist areas. What can people learn from the semi-intelligent slime mold? Watch this talk to find out.


http://on.ted.com/sz7m

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▶ Crystal Ball, Magic Wand, or Invisible Hand?

Crystal Ball, Magic Wand, or Invisible Hand?
How to Master our Future in Times of Digital Revolution.

Dirk Helbing

Opening keynote address delivered at CESUN 2014, Hoboken (New York City), on June 9.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tYjX7qlq-AY

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▶ Towards a Self-Regulating Society

Towards a Self-Regulating Society. Dirk Helbing, ETH Zurich. 2014/05/20
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Anne Landreat's curator insight, June 17, 7:12 AM

Vers une société auto-régulée. En Anglais.