Talks
Follow
Find
86.2K views | +80 today
 
Scooped by Complexity Digest
onto Talks
Scoop.it!

Didier Sornette: How we can predict the next financial crisis

The 2007-2008 financial crisis, you might think, was an unpredictable one-time crash. But Didier Sornette and his Financial Crisis Observatory have plotted a set of early warning signs for unstable, growing systems, tracking the moment when any bubble is about to pop. (And he's seeing it happen again, right now.)

more...
Bernard Ryefield's curator insight, June 17, 2013 4:14 PM

 

Didier Sornette theory of Dragon-Kings vs Black Swans is supported by a number of concepts from complexity science and certainly needs close scrutinity.

 

The Illusion of the Perpetual Money Machine

D. Sornette, P. Cauwels

http://arxiv.org/abs/1212.2833

 

Dragon Kings, Black Swans and the Prediction of Crises

Didier Sornette

http://arxiv.org/abs/0907.4290

 

Predictability and suppression of extreme events in complex systems

Hugo L. D. de Souza Cavalcante, Marcos Oria, Didier Sornette, Edward Ott, Daniel J. Gauthier

http://arxiv.org/abs/1301.0244

 

Luciano Lampi's curator insight, June 18, 2013 3:30 PM

si non é vero...é ben trovato!

ComplexInsight's curator insight, June 24, 2013 3:05 AM

Didier Sornette and team's work .- highlights role of how system feedback can drive a variety of systems through phase transition resulting in dramatic structural and behavioural change in system behaviour.  While many of the underpinning ideas presented have been discussed extensively in the fields of chaos and complex systems - his teams methods of  analysis and publication combined with the variety of systems he and his team study will hopefully help gain a wider acceptance of using these methods to understand, model and steer systems behaviour. A video well worth watching.

Talks
Online talks related to complex systems
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Complexity Digest
Scoop.it!

Responsible IT Innovation: From Big Data to Artificial Intelligence and Robotics

more...
Scooped by Complexity Digest
Scoop.it!

How messy problems can inspire creativity

How messy problems can inspire creativity | Talks | Scoop.it
Challenges and problems can derail your creative process ... or they can make you more creative than ever. In the surprising story behind the best-selling solo piano album of all time, Tim Harford may just convince you of the advantages of having to work with a little mess.
Complexity Digest's insight:

"Just because you don't like it, it does not mean that it is not helpful"

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Complexity Digest
Scoop.it!

How To Help Every Child Fulfil Their Potential

How To Help Every Child Fulfil Their Potential | Talks | Scoop.it

Ever wondered why kids say they’re bored at school, or why they stop trying when the work gets harder? Educationalist Carol Dweck explains how the wrong kind of praise actually *harms* young people.
This short video is essential viewing for EVERYONE – from teachers and education workers to relatives and friends - and will totally revolutionise the way you interact with children.


https://www.thersa.org/discover/videos/rsa-animate/2015/how-to-help-every-child-fulfil-their-potential/

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Complexity Digest
Scoop.it!

Complex Systems Science: Where Does It Come From and Where is It Going To?

Today complex systems science is rapidly growing as a discipline, with relevance to many areas of science and as an approach to addressing a wide range of real world problems. Understanding the fundamental mathematical origins of complex systems science reveals its conceptual richness and ability to advance science and expand its application. I will review these origins, describe some current applications, and point to the opportunities of the future.


Complex Systems Science: Where Does It Come From and Where is It Going To?
Yaneer Bar-Yam

Opening plenary address at the Conference on Complex Systems 2015, at Arizona State University in Tempe, Arizona.

http://www.necsi.edu/research/overview/ccs15.html 

Complexity Digest's insight:

See Also: Videos of all plenary talks at 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Complexity Digest
Scoop.it!

How we can make the world a better place by 2030

How we can make the world a better place by 2030 | Talks | Scoop.it
Can we end hunger and poverty, halt climate change and achieve gender equality in the next 15 years? The governments of the world think we can. Meeting at the UN in September 2015, they agreed to a new set of Global Goals for the development of the world to 2030. Social progress expert Michael Green invites us to imagine how these goals and their vision for a better world can be achieved.


http://go.ted.com/CL78

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Complexity Digest
Scoop.it!

The future of flying robots

The future of flying robots | Talks | Scoop.it

At his lab at the University of Pennsylvania, Vijay Kumar and his team have created autonomous aerial robots inspired by honeybees. Their latest breakthrough: Precision Farming, in which swarms of robots map, reconstruct and analyze every plant and piece of fruit in an orchard, providing vital information to farmers that can help improve yields and make water management smarter.


http://go.ted.com/CCaq 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Complexity Digest
Scoop.it!

Civilization Far From Equilibrium - Energy, Complexity, and Human Survival

Human societies use complexity -- within their institutions and technologies -- to address their various problems, and they need high-quality energy to create and sustain this complexity. But now greater complexity is producing diminishing returns in wellbeing, while the energetic cost of key sources of energy is rising fast. Simultaneously, humankind's problems are becoming vastly harder, which requires societies to deliver yet more complexity and thus consume yet more energy. Resolving this paradox is the central challenge of the 21st century. Thomas Homer-Dixon holds the CIGI Chair of Global Systems at the Balsillie School of International Affairs in Waterloo, Canada, and is a Professor at the University of Waterloo.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Vf-y3mv57U

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Complexity Digest
Scoop.it!

What explains the rise of humans?

What explains the rise of humans? | Talks | Scoop.it

Seventy thousand years ago, our human ancestors were insignificant animals, just minding their own business in a corner of Africa with all the other animals. But now, few would disagree that humans dominate planet Earth; we've spread to every continent, and our actions determine the fate of other animals (and possibly Earth itself). How did we get from there to here? Historian Yuval Noah Harari suggests a surprising reason for the rise of humanity.


http://go.ted.com/b3Wv 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Complexity Digest
Scoop.it!

The Global Brain Conference Track at IS4IS Vienna 2015

The Global Brain Conference Track at IS4IS Vienna 2015 | Talks | Scoop.it

The Global Brain Conference Track took place a couple of weeks ago. We have streamed it live to the web and, additionally, edited and uploaded videos of most of talks to the GBI YouTube channel, including:


The Global Brain Conference Track Page: http://vienna2015.globalbraininstitute.org

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Complexity Digest
Scoop.it!

Do we see reality as it is?

Do we see reality as it is? | Talks | Scoop.it

Cognitive scientist Donald Hoffman is trying to answer a big question: Do we experience the world as it really is ... or as we need it to be? In this ever so slightly mind-blowing talk, he ponders how our minds construct reality for us.


http://go.ted.com/bVsu

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Complexity Digest
Scoop.it!

Programming bacteria to detect cancer (and maybe treat it)

Programming bacteria to detect cancer (and maybe treat it) | Talks | Scoop.it

Liver cancer is one of the most difficult cancers to detect, but synthetic biologist Tal Danino had a left-field thought: What if we could create a probiotic, edible bacteria that was "programmed" to find liver tumors? His insight exploits something we're just beginning to understand about bacteria: their power of quorum sensing, or doing something together once they reach critical mass. Danino, a TED Fellow, explains how quorum sensing works — and how clever bacteria working together could someday change cancer treatment.


http://go.ted.com/b48E 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Complexity Digest
Scoop.it!

Peter Sheridan Dodds and Chris Danforth on Measuring the Happiness, Health, and Stories of Populations

Peter Sheridan Dodds and Chris Danforth on Measuring the Happiness, Health, and Stories of Populations | Talks | Scoop.it
Peter Sheridan Dodds and Chris Danforth on Measuring the Happiness, Health, and Stories of Populations
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Complexity Digest
Scoop.it!

Francis Heylighen: Towards an Intelligent Network for Matching Offer and Demand

Towards an Intelligent Network for Matching Offer and Demand: from the sharing economy to the Global Brain
Francis Heylighen

December 4, 2015, Brussels

Workshop on Offer Networks
http://onet.globalbraininstitute.org
The Global Brain Institute
Vrije Universiteit Brussel


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DG0N1yiJ6lw

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Complexity Digest
Scoop.it!

Dirk Helbing – Breaking the Wall to Digital Democracy @Falling Walls Conference 2015

As the development of the Internet of Things is taking up speed, connected devices are producing staggering amounts of data. Estimates say that by 2020, there will be 26 times more connected things than people – devices which will produce 400 zettabytes of data per year (one zettabyte is a trillion gigabytes). Managing this flood of data is one of the biggest challenges facing policy, industry and civilian societies. The task of scientists is to test and propose rules, frameworks and technologies to support this process, reveal opportunities and prevent risks and abuse. Dirk Helbing is a physicist and professor of computational social science with a particular interest in modelling and simulating complex socio-economic systems and scenarios. With his team at ETH Zurich, he is researching how big data from connected devices can be fed into a so-called Planetary Nervous System, a transparent, open-access information system which can support real-time measurements of the world. A system like this could revolutionise many sectors, from urban planning and traffic control to the early detection of epidemics and earthquake prediction. In the wrong hands, however, big data can pose enormous risks to privacy and personal freedom. As opposed to corporate or state-owned data mining tools, Dirk proposes a citizen-owned participatory platform, with extensive features to protect users’ privacy and the ultimate goal to treat big data – and the information extracted from it – largely as public goods. At Falling Walls, he presents this model of a democratic data ecosystem as an alternative to gloomier “Big Brother” scenarios.


BREAKING THE WALL TO DIGITAL DEMOCRACY
How Socio-Physics Shapes the Future of Smart Societies
Dirk Helbing
Professor of Computational Social Science, ETH Zurich

http://falling-walls.com/videos/Dirk-Helbing-7183

https://vimeo.com/147442522

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Complexity Digest from Center for Collective Dynamics of Complex Systems (CoCo)
Scoop.it!

Keynote Speech by Dr. Yaneer Bar-Yam

Center for Collective Dynamics of Complex Systems Kick-Off Ceremony and Conference Thursday October 22, 2015 Engineering & Science Building 2008, Binghamton…

Via Hiroki Sayama
more...
António F Fonseca's curator insight, October 29, 2015 5:08 AM

Very nice talk about food and riots and other complex phenomena by the founder of NECSI Yanner Bar-Yam

Scooped by Complexity Digest
Scoop.it!

Soon we'll cure diseases with a cell, not a pill

Soon we'll cure diseases with a cell, not a pill | Talks | Scoop.it

Current medical treatment boils down to six words: Have disease, take pill, kill something. But physician Siddhartha Mukherjee points to a future of medicine that will transform the way we heal.


http://go.ted.com/bNT2

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Complexity Digest
Scoop.it!

A visual history of human knowledge

A visual history of human knowledge | Talks | Scoop.it

How does knowledge grow? Sometimes it begins with one insight and grows into many branches. Infographics expert Manuel Lima explores the thousand-year history of mapping data -- from languages to dynasties -- using trees of information. It's a fascinating history of visualizations, and a look into humanity's urge to map what we know.


http://go.ted.com/bQmc

Complexity Digest's insight:

Networks...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Complexity Digest
Scoop.it!

César Hidalgo on Why Information Grows

César visits the RSA to present a new view of the relationship between individual and collective knowledge, linking information theory, economics and biology to explain the deep evolution of social and economic systems.
In a radical rethink of what an economy is, one of WIRED magazine’s 50 People Who Could Change the World, César Hidalgo argues that it is the measure of a nation’s cultural complexity – the nexus of people, ideas and invention - rather than its GDP or per-capita income, that explains the success or failure of its economic performance. To understand the growth of economies, Hidalgo argues, we first need to understand the growth of order itself.


https://www.thersa.org/discover/videos/event-videos/2015/07/cesar-hidalgo-on-why-information-grows/

more...
António F Fonseca's curator insight, August 5, 2015 8:40 AM

Yes because informatio is a byproduct of order.

Scooped by Complexity Digest
Scoop.it!

How a driverless car sees the road

How a driverless car sees the road | Talks | Scoop.it

Statistically, the least reliable part of the car is ... the driver. Chris Urmson heads up Google's driverless car program, one of several efforts to remove humans from the driver's seat. He talks about where his program is right now, and shares fascinating footage that shows how the car sees the road and makes autonomous decisions about what to do next.


http://go.ted.com/bh7A 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Complexity Digest
Scoop.it!

▶ Open Innovation 2.0 and the Planetary Nervous System for Everyone - YouTube

Talk given at the Open Innovation 2.0 Conference - Moving towards European Innovation Ecosystems, Espoo, Finland, on June 9, 2015
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Complexity Digest
Scoop.it!

The surprisingly logical minds of babies

The surprisingly logical minds of babies | Talks | Scoop.it

How do babies learn so much from so little so quickly? In a fun, experiment-filled talk, cognitive scientist Laura Schulz shows how our young ones make decisions with a surprisingly strong sense of logic, well before they can talk.


http://go.ted.com/bzYt

more...
No comment yet.