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"the Clothesline Paradox" | Conversation with Tim O Reilly | Edge

"the Clothesline Paradox" | Conversation with Tim O Reilly | Edge | Talks | Scoop.it

If we're going to get science policy right, it's really important for us to study the economic benefit of open access and not accept the arguments of incumbents. Existing media companies claim that they need ever stronger and longer copyright protection and new, draconian laws to protect them, and meanwhile, new free ecosystems, like the Web, have actually led to enormous wealth creation and enormous new opportunities for social value. And yes, they did in fact lead in some cases to the destruction of incumbents, but that's the kind of creative destruction that we should celebrate in the economy. We have to accept that, particularly in the area of science, there's an incredible opportunity for open access to enable new business models.

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Can we prevent the end of the world?

Can we prevent the end of the world? | Talks | Scoop.it

A post-apocalyptic Earth, emptied of humans, seems like the stuff of science fiction TV and movies. But in this short, surprising talk, Lord Martin Rees asks us to think about our real existential risks — natural and human-made threats that could wipe out humanity. As a concerned member of the human race, he asks: What’s the worst thing that could possibly happen?


http://on.ted.com/s04PN

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The World after Big Data: Building the Self-Regulating Society

The World after Big Data: Building the Self-Regulating Society. Dirk Helbing, ETH Zurich.
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What humans can learn from semi-intelligent slime

What humans can learn from semi-intelligent slime | Talks | Scoop.it

Inspired by biological design and self-organizing systems, artist Heather Barnett co-creates with physarum polycephalum, a eukaryotic microorganism that lives in cool, moist areas. What can people learn from the semi-intelligent slime mold? Watch this talk to find out.


http://on.ted.com/sz7m

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▶ Crystal Ball, Magic Wand, or Invisible Hand?

Crystal Ball, Magic Wand, or Invisible Hand?
How to Master our Future in Times of Digital Revolution.

Dirk Helbing

Opening keynote address delivered at CESUN 2014, Hoboken (New York City), on June 9.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tYjX7qlq-AY

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▶ Robin Dunbar on Evolution

What makes us human?

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▶ Towards a Self-Regulating Society

Towards a Self-Regulating Society. Dirk Helbing, ETH Zurich. 2014/05/20
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Anne Landreat's curator insight, June 17, 7:12 AM

Vers une société auto-régulée. En Anglais.

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How languages evolve - Alex Gendler

How languages evolve - Alex Gendler | Talks | Scoop.it
Over the course of human history, thousands of languages have developed from what was once a much smaller number. How did we end up with so many? And how do we keep track of them all? Alex Gendler explains how linguists group languages into language families, demonstrating how these linguistic trees give us crucial insights into the past.

Via Ashish Umre
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Intelligence: Born Smart, Born Equal, Born Different

Intelligence: Born Smart, Born Equal, Born Different | Talks | Scoop.it
Adam Rutherford on the rise, fall and rise of the genetics of intelligence.

Via FastTFriend
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FastTFriend's curator insight, May 25, 5:35 AM

Adam Rutherford on the rise, fall and rise of the genetics of intelligence.

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▶ Seth Lloyd: Quantum Machine Learning

Machine learning algorithms find patterns in big data sets. This talk presents quantum machine learning algorithms that give exponential speed-ups over their best existing classical counterparts. The algorithms work by mapping the data set into a quantum state (big quantum data) that contains the data in quantum superposition. Quantum coherence is then used to reveal patterns in the data. The quantum algorithms scale as the logarithm of the size of the database.


Seth Lloyd visited the Quantum AI Lab at Google LA to give a tech talk on "Quantum Machine Learning." This talk took place on January 29, 2014.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wkBPp9UovVU

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▶ Jeffrey Johnson: From networks to hypernetworks in complex systems science

Complex systems have multilevel dynamics emerging from interactions between their parts. Networks have provided deep insights into those dynamics, but only represent relations between two things while the generality is relations between many things. Hypergraphs and their related Galois connections have long been used to model such relations, but their set theoretic nature has inadequate and inappropriate structure. Simplicial complexes can better represent relations between many things but they too have limitations. Hypersimplices, which are defined as simplices in which the relational structure is explicit, overcome these limitations. Hypernetworks, which in the simplest cases are sets of hypersimplices, have a multidimensional connectivity structure which constrains those dynamics represented by patterns of numbers over the hypersimplices and their vertices. The dynamics of hypernetwork also involve the formation and disintegration of hypersimplices, which are seen as structural events related to system time. Hypernetworks provide algebraic structure able to represent multilevel systems and combine their top-down and bottom-up micro, meso and macro-dynamics. Hypernetworks naturally generalise graphs, hypergraphs and networks. These ideas will be presented in a graphical way through examples which also show the relevance of hypernetworks to policy. It will be argued that hypernetworks are necessary if not sufficient for a science of complex systems and its applications. The talk will be aimed at a general audience and no prior knowledge will be assumed.


10th ECCO / GBI seminar series. Spring 2014


From networks to hypernetworks in complex systems science



April 18, 2014, Brussels



Jeffrey Johnson
Open University, UK



Slides, references and more: http://ecco.vub.ac.be/?q=node/231 

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Liz Rykert's curator insight, May 10, 9:32 PM

I am fascinated with the role of networks in complex systems as the scaffolds that connect and conduct.  

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The Strange New Science of Chaos - YouTube

A 1989 program, with Lorenz


Via Bernard Ryefield
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Vasileios Basios's curator insight, April 1, 9:43 AM

Wow! such a rare delightful material .... Ralph Abraham and Lorenz who could imagine!

Luciano Lampi's curator insight, April 16, 8:31 AM

to be watched by the new generations!  old certitudes and new doubts?

Liz Rykert's curator insight, April 19, 9:56 PM

Great to hear Lorenz

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From Crystal Ball to Magic Wand: The New World Order in Times of Digital Revolution

From Crystal Ball to Magic Wand: The New World Order in Times of Digital Revolution.

Dirk Helbing, ETH Zurich.

Talk delivered via skype on March 24, 2014, to the AAAI workshop on THE INTERSECTION OF ROBUST INTELLIGENCE AND TRUST IN AUTONOMOUS SYSTEMS


We need another Apollo project, but this time focusing on our Earth. I am ready for this, are you?

Please watch this movie to the end.
The solution to our world's problems is different from what many strategic thinkers believed.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AErRh_yDr-Q

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Eli Levine's curator insight, April 2, 10:07 PM

I'm not perfect, but I'd say I've done a reasonably good job at predicting these things happening.

 

You have economic pinches, combined with aspirations towards ideals, of course you're going to have Arab Springs!  Furthermore, you have governments that are not following along according to the newly expressed needs of the people, you're more likely to get unrest, violence and increase the POTENTIAL for overthrow of your whole system of governance and economics (speaking, of course, with regards to Egypt especially).  Better to improve your odds and adapt yourself to the new normal of the society's needs (which are fairly consistent throughout time, space and culture).

 

What on Earth are our current policy-makers doing by persisting with the overly-cozy relationship with the private elite and their philosophies over the actual, presented needs of the general public?  Where is their more accurate view of humanity, themselves and the various needs and functions of humanity?

 

Seriously?

And I'm the one on the outside.

 

Think about it.

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▶ Dirk Helbing on complexity in economic theory

This interview with Dirk Helbing on the Future of the economy is part of the Futurium Talking Futures interview series. More information is available here: https://ec.europa.eu/digital-agenda/futurium/en/interviews 

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Eli Levine's curator insight, February 28, 12:12 AM

Indeed, it is when we shut the door and turn our backs on those and that which do us harm, that we'll actually realize some real benefits amongst this species.


Think about it.

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A Magna Carta for the web

A Magna Carta for the web | Talks | Scoop.it

Sir Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web 25 years ago. So it’s worth a listen when he warns us: There’s a battle ahead. Eroding net neutrality, filter bubbles and centralizing corporate control all threaten the web’s wide-open spaces. It’s up to users to fight for the right to access and openness. The question is, What kind of Internet do we want?


http://on.ted.com/h0Pgm

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Interview: Prof Geoffrey West on complexity science

CLC interviewed Prof. Geoffrey West, Distinguished Professor and Past President of Sante Fe Institute, at the World Cities Summit 2014 on the study of cities in relation to complexity science....

Via Roger D. Jones, PhD
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▶ Global Brain: Web as Self-organizing Distributed Intelligence - Francis Heylighen

Distributed intelligence is an ability to solve problems and process information that is not localized inside a single person or computer, but that emerges from the coordinated interactions between a large number of people and their technological extensions. The Internet and in particular the World-Wide Web form a nearly ideal substrate for the emergence of a distributed intelligence that spans the planet, integrating the knowledge, skills and intuitions of billions of people supported by billions of information-processing devices. This intelligence becomes increasingly powerful through a process of self-organization in which people and devices selectively reinforce useful links, while rejecting useless ones. This process can be modeled mathematically and computationally by representing individuals and devices as agents, connected by a weighted directed network along which "challenges" propagate. Challenges represent problems, opportunities or questions that must be processed by the agents to extract benefits and avoid penalties. Link weights are increased whenever agents extract benefit from the challenges propagated along it. My research group is developing such a large-scale simulation environment in order to better understand how the web may boost our collective intelligence. The anticipated outcome of that process is a "global brain", i.e. a nervous system for the planet that would be able to tackle both global and personal problems.


Summer School in cognitive Science: Web Science and the Mind
Institut des sciences cognitives, UQAM, Montréal, Canada
http://www.summer14.isc.uqam.ca/


http://www.isc.uqam.ca/

;

FRANCIS HEYLIGHEN, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, ECCO - Evolution, Complexity and Cognition research group






Towards a Global Brain: the Web as a Self-organizing, Distributed Intelligence

http://youtu.be/w2sznrVtiLg

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Tom Cockburn's curator insight, July 17, 4:06 AM

Apart from outraging some religious groups and upsetting some neo- luddites,this sounds interesting,provided we have some checks and balances/ failsafe options too

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The Fascinating World of Complex Systems

Part 1:             http://www.multimedia.ethz.ch/campus/zurichmeetsny/?doi=10.3930/ETHZ/AV-80b92958-97b0-4ad7-b07f-b15192931efc&autostart=false
 
Part 2:             http://www.multimedia.ethz.ch/campus/zurichmeetsny/?doi=10.3930/ETHZ/AV-1db36e67-b2d7-4229-8973-ef1bb54dde27&autostart=false
  
http://www.complexsys.org/publicprograms.html

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june holley's curator insight, July 9, 8:40 AM

Videos on complex systems.

Tom Cockburn's curator insight, July 17, 4:07 AM

Interesting

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▶ Dirk Helbing: How to Create a Better World - YouTube

It probably started with Linux, then came Wikipedia and Open Street Map. Crowd-sourced information systems are central for the Digital Society to thrive. So, what's next? I will introduce a number of concepts such as the Planetary Nervous System, Global Participatory Platform, Interactive Virtual Worlds, User-Controlled Information Filters and Reputation Systems, and the Digital Data Purse. I will also introduce ideas such as the Social Mirror, Intercultural Adapter, the Social Protector and Social Money as tools to create a better world. These can help us to avoid systemic instabilities, market failures, tragedies of the commons, and exploitation, and to create the framework for a Participatory Market Society, where everyone can be better off.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I_Lphxknozc

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Managing Complex Systems Based on Self-Regulation

Managing Complex Systems Based on Self-Regulation. Dirk Helbing, ETH Zurich. 2014/05/20


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eaD6xPM3AJI&index=2&list=UUYrlsSzinJN42rKmFlOOYxA

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Eli Levine's curator insight, June 9, 9:30 AM

It's also important to remember that complex systems are frequently larger than the observed and observable universe, such that there may be factors which create self-regulated systems.  A government is apart of the same social system as an economy and, through SOME forms of oversight and regulation can overcome the "boom and bust" cycles of the laissez-faire operated economy.  It's a question of honestly coordinating with the private companies, especially in the financial field, in order to get the best outcomes that they wouldn't really do on their own for the sake of small "self" and short term profit that does not consider social and environmental factors.  Yes, it may seem redundant and silly at times.  But it seems that the background noise of a system, the static, plays as important a role in producing the ultimate sound that is achieved within the social system as does the actual sound of the system itself.  You have to oversee the background noise as well as the main tune in order to achieve the clearest and most consistent sound according to our own social logics and our own social tastes.

 

Economically, it's technically all the same stuff.  Economics is much more of a technical field than foreign policy, which is also more technical than social policy.  All three play a role in producing optimal well being within a given society and in all three there are better and worse options for handling things.  It's as if economics gives the architecture and structure of the society itself through its interaction with the natural laws of economic physics and government/corporate policy (the structure of a house, for example), while social policy is the decoration of the house, internally and externally, while foreign policy is how your society interacts with its neighbors.  Within each house is a variety of different people, and they together form the basis of the social family within the given government's jurisdiction.  Politics, history and the outcomes of the economic, social and foreign policies influences the internal dynamics amongst the neighbors, thus giving life to the house that is intangible, yet very much apart of the universe, for better and for worse.  While there are no right or wrong answers, per se, there are definitely better and worse options that are available with regards to how things play out in the empirical world.  Some people's brains are better at sensing how the empirical world actually works and are able to perceive and willing to work with the natural laws of the universe, rather than trying to go their own way and, essentially, attempt to fly in the face of the impossible and hold out for the extremely improbable without having alternatives available to follow through on.  There is no freedom in this universe; you either obey the natural laws and physics, both inside of and outside of our social worlds, or else you're driven off and/or die.  I do not know how it is that people still go for the technically impossible or suboptimal for the sake of a belief, ideology or inkling within their brains that does not match the way the universe actually works.

 

Think about it.

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Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos - Steven Strogatz, Cornell University - YouTube

Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos - Steven Strogatz, Cornell University - YouTube | Talks | Scoop.it

This course of 25 lectures, filmed at Cornell University in Spring 2014, is intended for newcomers to nonlinear dynamics and chaos. It closely follows Prof. Strogatz's book, "Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos: With Applications to Physics, Biology, Chemistry, and Engineering." The mathematical treatment is friendly and informal, but still careful. Analytical methods, concrete examples, and geometric intuition are stressed. The theory is developed systematically, starting with first-order differential equations and their bifurcations, followed by phase plane analysis, limit cycles and their bifurcations, and culminating with the Lorenz equations, chaos, iterated maps, period doubling, renormalization, fractals, and strange attractors. A unique feature of the course is its emphasis on applications. These include airplane wing vibrations, biological rhythms, insect outbreaks, chemical oscillators, chaotic waterwheels, and even a technique for using chaos to send secret messages. In each case, the scientific background is explained at an elementary level and closely integrated with the mathematical theory. The theoretical work is enlivened by frequent use of computer graphics, simulations, and videotaped demonstrations of nonlinear phenomena. The essential prerequisite is single-variable calculus, including curve sketching, Taylor series, and separable differential equations. In a few places, multivariable calculus (partial derivatives, Jacobian matrix, divergence theorem) and linear algebra (eigenvalues and eigenvectors) are used. Fourier analysis is not assumed, and is developed where needed. Introductory physics is used throughout. Other scientific prerequisites would depend on the applications considered, but in all cases, a first course should be adequate preparation


Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos - Steven Strogatz, Cornell University

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLbN57C5Zdl6j_qJA-pARJnKsmROzPnO9V

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Jean-Michel Livowsky's curator insight, June 2, 3:22 AM

Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos...

Jean-Michel Livowsky's curator insight, June 2, 3:23 AM

Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos

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What ants teach us about the brain, cancer and the Internet

What ants teach us about the brain, cancer and the Internet | Talks | Scoop.it

Ecologist Deborah Gordon studies ants wherever she can find them -- in the desert, in the tropics, in her kitchen ... In this fascinating talk, she explains her obsession with insects most of us would happily swat away without a second thought. She argues that ant life provides a useful model for learning about many other topics, including disease, technology and the human brain.


http://on.ted.com/h0Emb 

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▶ Prof. A. E. Eiben: The Next Big Thing in Artificial Evolution

In this talk Prof. Eiben presents a vision about the upcoming breakthrough in artificial evolution: animate artefacts that (self-)reproduce in physical spaces. In other words, he envision the ``Evolution of Things'', rather than just the evolution of digital objects, leading to a new field of Embodied Artificial Evolution. After presenting this vision he elaborate on some of the technical challenges and relate the main algorithmic/technical requirements to the current know-how in EC. Finally, he will speculate about possible applications, their societal impacts, and argue that these developments will radically change our lives.
More information: http://www.cs.vu.nl/~gusz/ and

http://www.lakeside-labs.com/news/news-detail/article/colloquium-8/

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Tom Cockburn's curator insight, July 17, 4:11 AM

Evolve your stuff...make it more ecofriendly perhaps?

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▶ Pierre Collet: Personalised Open Education for the Masses (POEM)

10th ECCO / GBI seminar series. Spring 2014

Personalised Open Education for the Masses (POEM).

April 11, 2014, Brussels

Pierre Collet, Strasbourg University


Slides: http://ecco.vub.ac.be/sites/all/files/POEMs%20VUB14.pdf 

Abstract, references and more: http://ecco.vub.ac.be/?q=node/226 

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Dan Ariely on ‘The Honest Truth About Dishonesty’

Dan Ariely on ‘The Honest Truth About Dishonesty’ | Talks | Scoop.it

Everyone cheats a little from time to time. But most major betrayals within organizations – from accounting fraud to doping in sports – start with a first step that crosses the line, according to Dan Ariely, a leading behavioral economist at Duke and author of The (Honest) Truth About Dishonesty: How We Lie to Everyone – Especially Ourselves. That step can start people on a “slippery slope.” In this interview with Wharton management professor Adam Grant, Ariely helps leaders understand how to prevent people from taking that first step, how to create a code of conduct that makes rules and expectations clear and why good rules are critical to organizations.


http://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article/dan-ariely-dishonestys-slippery-slope/

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Eli Levine's curator insight, April 11, 1:15 PM

This is troubling to me, mainly because I know how easily I could fall victim to a potential slippery slope series of events that turns me from one side to another.  I'm just being honest about it.  There's no real reason yet to differentiate me from Nancy Botwin, who goes from a surburban widow to a major queen pin in the drug trade (besides the fact that I'm not likely to deal drugs).  Am I seriously one of the few human beings who will question him/herself with regards to their own integrity?

 

I don't know.

 

But if this research is accurate, it's bound to be something that's near universal for our species.  That means that you and I are effected by it, whether we like or admit it or not.

 

Sad and scary.

 

Think about it.

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▶ Alessandro Vespignani on theoretical developments for complex networks and systems

This interview with Alessandro Vespignani is about the future of modelling and forecasting of epidemics and is part of the Futurium Talking Futures interview series. More information is available here:

https://ec.europa.eu/digital-agenda/futurium/en/interviews


Via Jean-Philippe BOCQUENET
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