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AP Human Geography
Geography Education for True Warriors!
Curated by Corey Butler
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Timelapse - The City Limits

*UPDATE May 10th: Here's a video interview that I did this morning for MSNBC : http://on.msnbc.com/juqWHz ---------- I shot this timelapse montage from late 2010 through early 2011. One year in the making.

 

With the intention of showing the duality between city and nature the timelapse, Dominic Boudreault created a beautiful montage of the urban landscape that is a thought-provoking piece. Locations include Montreal, Quebec, Toronto, New York and Chicago.


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Large Cities: Where the Skills Are

Large Cities: Where the Skills Are | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Human progress, to a large degree, has depended on the continual expansion of social networks, which enable faster sharing and shaping of ideas. And humanity’s greatest social innovation remains the city.

 

Urban networks depend on increasing interaction and collaboration...and it pays off.  This article details the correlation between population size of a city and the earning potential of it's citizens. 

 


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Seth Dixon's comment, October 5, 2011 6:36 PM
My pleasure!
Thomas Robson's curator insight, May 20, 5:34 AM

This article details the correlation between population size of a city and the earning potential of it's citizens. Human progress, to a large degree, has depended on the continual expansion of social networks, which enable faster sharing and shaping of ideas. And humanity’s greatest social innovation remains the city. As our cities grow larger, the synapses that connect them—people with exceptional social skills—are becoming ever more essential to economic growth."The bars on this map show three types of job skills—analytic, social, and physical. The height of each bar is a measure of the average mix of skill within a given city’s labor force—the higher the bar, the more advanced the skill level within that city." 


The fact that the article call them all city is an example of Urban Hierarchy, a theory discussed in our AP Human Geography Urban Unit. This article does not touch on any of the zone models we learned in our unit. The article is able to show through this map that the more analytic jobs there are in a cities Central Business District the higher the average pay the city has. (As evidenced by New York and Boston being much higher then say Albuquerque).