AP Human Geography
Follow
Find tag "economic"
978 views | +0 today
AP Human Geography
Geography Education for True Warriors!
Curated by Corey Butler
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Corey Butler from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Large Cities: Where the Skills Are

Large Cities: Where the Skills Are | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Human progress, to a large degree, has depended on the continual expansion of social networks, which enable faster sharing and shaping of ideas. And humanity’s greatest social innovation remains the city.

 

Urban networks depend on increasing interaction and collaboration...and it pays off.  This article details the correlation between population size of a city and the earning potential of it's citizens. 

 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's comment, October 5, 2011 9:36 PM
My pleasure!
Thomas Robson's curator insight, May 20, 2014 8:34 AM

This article details the correlation between population size of a city and the earning potential of it's citizens. Human progress, to a large degree, has depended on the continual expansion of social networks, which enable faster sharing and shaping of ideas. And humanity’s greatest social innovation remains the city. As our cities grow larger, the synapses that connect them—people with exceptional social skills—are becoming ever more essential to economic growth."The bars on this map show three types of job skills—analytic, social, and physical. The height of each bar is a measure of the average mix of skill within a given city’s labor force—the higher the bar, the more advanced the skill level within that city." 


The fact that the article call them all city is an example of Urban Hierarchy, a theory discussed in our AP Human Geography Urban Unit. This article does not touch on any of the zone models we learned in our unit. The article is able to show through this map that the more analytic jobs there are in a cities Central Business District the higher the average pay the city has. (As evidenced by New York and Boston being much higher then say Albuquerque).  

Rescooped by Corey Butler from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Detroit: The 'Shrinking City' That Isn't Actually Shrinking

Detroit: The 'Shrinking City' That Isn't Actually Shrinking | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
We're often told that Detroit has been abandoned—but the metro area is stable, and addressing sprawl is still a challenge...

 

Population size and physical size...not always as correlated as one might assume in this age of urban sprawl.  This details some of the difficulties in revitalizing abandoned sections of a city when the economic motive to expand outward is so easy. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Wyatt Fratnz's curator insight, May 26, 8:59 PM

This article investigates the possibilities of the progression of the city of Detroit, despite all the negative connotations. They show us the math behind it's decreasing populations along with it's past expansion, what's behind it and the urban sprawl of it all.


This is a great real-world example of uneven development, zones of abandonment, disamenity, and gentrification. It goes to show how all of these factors afflict with the city as a whole.