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Detroit: The 'Shrinking City' That Isn't Actually Shrinking

Detroit: The 'Shrinking City' That Isn't Actually Shrinking | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
We're often told that Detroit has been abandoned—but the metro area is stable, and addressing sprawl is still a challenge...

 

Population size and physical size...not always as correlated as one might assume in this age of urban sprawl.  This details some of the difficulties in revitalizing abandoned sections of a city when the economic motive to expand outward is so easy. 


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AP Human Geography
Geography Education for True Warriors!
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Where the 99% are.

Where the 99% are. | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

Here’s the growth of the Occupy Wall Street movement, as charted by FourSquare checkins.


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Timelapse - The City Limits

*UPDATE May 10th: Here's a video interview that I did this morning for MSNBC : http://on.msnbc.com/juqWHz ---------- I shot this timelapse montage from late 2010 through early 2011. One year in the making.

 

With the intention of showing the duality between city and nature the timelapse, Dominic Boudreault created a beautiful montage of the urban landscape that is a thought-provoking piece. Locations include Montreal, Quebec, Toronto, New York and Chicago.


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Large Cities: Where the Skills Are

Large Cities: Where the Skills Are | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Human progress, to a large degree, has depended on the continual expansion of social networks, which enable faster sharing and shaping of ideas. And humanity’s greatest social innovation remains the city.

 

Urban networks depend on increasing interaction and collaboration...and it pays off.  This article details the correlation between population size of a city and the earning potential of it's citizens. 

 


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Seth Dixon's comment, October 5, 2011 6:36 PM
My pleasure!
Thomas Robson's curator insight, May 20, 5:34 AM

This article details the correlation between population size of a city and the earning potential of it's citizens. Human progress, to a large degree, has depended on the continual expansion of social networks, which enable faster sharing and shaping of ideas. And humanity’s greatest social innovation remains the city. As our cities grow larger, the synapses that connect them—people with exceptional social skills—are becoming ever more essential to economic growth."The bars on this map show three types of job skills—analytic, social, and physical. The height of each bar is a measure of the average mix of skill within a given city’s labor force—the higher the bar, the more advanced the skill level within that city." 


The fact that the article call them all city is an example of Urban Hierarchy, a theory discussed in our AP Human Geography Urban Unit. This article does not touch on any of the zone models we learned in our unit. The article is able to show through this map that the more analytic jobs there are in a cities Central Business District the higher the average pay the city has. (As evidenced by New York and Boston being much higher then say Albuquerque).  

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The Magic Bean Shop and The Fries that Bind US

The Magic Bean Shop and The Fries that Bind US | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

This is one of the most interesting maps I have seen for a while!  This map tells a wonderful story of how globalized our economy and our population have become.  As you view this map, consider the following questions:

 

Notice how many countries are strictly consumers of Starbucks and McDonald's products and not producers of some component of their product.  Is this coincidental or is there a cultural and economic divide?

 

As McDonald's continues to expand its markets, what challenges do they face as a corporation?  Does McDonald's have the potential, due to its economic prowess, to influcence policy in some of these emerging markets?

 

 

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For the Unemployed, Geography Can Be Destiny - Jobs & Economy - The Atlantic Cities

For the Unemployed, Geography Can Be Destiny - Jobs & Economy - The Atlantic Cities | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Not every place and every citizen has been affected by the recession the same way...

 

Not every place and every citizen has been affected by the recession the same way...

For the Unemployed, Geography Can Be Destiny by Richard Florida. This article highlights the uneven distribution of unemployment, and consequently, of job availability. Where is unemployment highest? How come? Getting a job isn't just about what you know and who you know, but where you know it.

Source: www.theatlanticcities.com

 

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Water quality under assault - The Baylor Lariat

Water quality under assault - The Baylor Lariat | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The Baylor LariatWater quality under assaultThe Baylor LariatDr. Ryan King, associate professor of biology at Baylor, and Dr.
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Next American City: Trees In Transit

Next American City: Trees In Transit | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Speed bumps, street markings, speed limits and other measures have all been used to create safer conditions for all users of the road. But what about trees?

 

A link for changes to the urban environment and city planning.


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elsa hunziker's comment, January 30, 2012 11:26 AM
Bucket list....
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Detroit: The 'Shrinking City' That Isn't Actually Shrinking

Detroit: The 'Shrinking City' That Isn't Actually Shrinking | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
We're often told that Detroit has been abandoned—but the metro area is stable, and addressing sprawl is still a challenge...

 

Population size and physical size...not always as correlated as one might assume in this age of urban sprawl.  This details some of the difficulties in revitalizing abandoned sections of a city when the economic motive to expand outward is so easy. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Amazing Statistics

This mind blowing information shows how the virtual and online world is changing so rapidly. Did you know there are 31 billion searches on Google every singl...

 

Globalization, education and the changing technological landscape. 


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Explore the 2010 census

Explore the 2010 census | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Census data showing population growth and shifts in the United States since 1990.

 

Non-Hispanic whites make up a dwindling share of the nation’s population, as their numbers drop in the Northeast and Midwest and grow slowly in the South and West.

A while back we looked at the changing demographics of black America, now it's time to look at the changes in white America. Why is this happening? What economic, cultural, demographic and political factors contribute to this pattern? What push factors and pull factors are at work?

Also, look at the interactive graphic, with mappable census data from the last 30 years, aggregated at the county level, or even block level. Link at: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/special/nation/census/2010/

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