Talentontwikkeling
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The Myth of Talent

The Myth of Talent | Talentontwikkeling | Scoop.it

Talent is not a birthright. Long term, focused, practice powered by the energy of passion and love of the process leads to amazing transformations. The bumbling beginner becomes the exalted expert. The trapped and depressed become the liberated and empowered. So why do we so easily buy into the limiting mythical idea about talent being nothing but a birthright?

 

There are two big reasons and the first has to do with our most basic fear – the fear of being rejected. The first word most of us learn is no. And from an early age we are programmed to get our rewards by performing as close to flawlessly as possible all of the time. Our outcomes become everything. We will go to extraordinary lengths, like giving our lives away to meaningless jobs that we could do in our sleep after a day of training, just to get a yes and a paternal pat on the back from an external source. So to avoid rejection we absolve ourselves of being responsible for our own creativity by agreeing with the myth.

 

And the other reason we are frozen by the myth of talent is the talented people themselves. The highly talented do not get our attention until their skill level is so high that no trace can be found of the bewildered beginner they surely have been. Their highly evolved skills do seem to come out of nowhere like a magical byproduct of the magical birthright we have been told about.


Via Bob Corlett
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Attribute Talent to an Action or Process, Not to a Person

Attribute Talent to an Action or Process, Not to a Person | Talentontwikkeling | Scoop.it
People who do great and creative things often hear "you are so talented." While that may seem nice, it causes a number of problems. According to psychologist Carol Dweck, we need to start attributing talent to processes and actions, not people.

Via Eileen Hurley
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The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented (NRC/GT)

The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented (NRC/GT)

Since 1990, The National Research Center on Gifted and Talented (NRC/GT) successfully competed for a series of federally funded grants under the Jacob K. Javits Gifted and Talented Education Act. Recently, Congress eliminated the Javits Act and the NRC/GT continued working on planned research tasks. We finalized our studies focusing on What Works in Gifted Education with the mathematics study at the University of Connecticut and the reading/language arts study at the University of Virginia. The respective research teams developed model-based curricula in mathematics for grade 3 students in general education classrooms and reading/language arts curricula for grade 3 students in gifted and talented programs reflecting the following curricular/instructional models: (1) Differentiation of Instruction Model (Carol Ann Tomlinson); (2) Depth and Complexity Model (Sandra N. Kaplan), and (3) Schoolwide Enrichment Model (Joseph S. Renzulli and Sally M. Reis). Multiple cohorts of students and their teachers participated in the two curricular studies and initial quantitative and qualitative results were shared with study participants and conference participants.

 

For persons interested in the results of our quantitative and qualitative mathematics research study, you may access the research monograph entitled What Works in Gifted Education Mathematics Study: Impact of Pre-differentiated and Enrichment Curricula on General Education Teachers and Their Students (Gubbins et al., 2013) on our website at (rm13242).

 

Articles focusing on the studies of mathematics and language arts completed by the University of Connecticut and the University of Virginia respectively have been submitted to journals in our field. An article entitled “Exploring the Relationship Between the Fidelity of Implementation and Academic Achievement in a Third-Grade Gifted Curriculum: A Mixed-Methods Study” (Azano et al., 2011) is available in the Journal of Advanced Academics.

 

We completed three new projects: (a) explore the theory of the malleability of intelligence related to research by Dr. Carol Dweck, Stanford University, and others; (b) summarize the unique curricular and instructional practices in STEM high schools; and (c) analyze the status of gifted education programming and services across the nation. An overview of these projects follows.

 

Malleable Minds Project
Dr. Carolyn M. Callahan worked with Dr. Rena Subotnik (Director of the Center for Psychology in the Schools and Education at the American Psychological Association), Dr. Ann Robinson (Past President of the National Association for Gifted Children), and Patricia Johnson (former Javits Program Director) to launch an initiative involving social and cognitive psychologists and neuroscientists. The goal of the project was to share emerging theories about student learning and talent development with researchers in gifted and talented education. The resulting book published by The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented entitled Malleable Minds: Translating Insights From Psychology and Neuroscience to Gifted Education, presents the latest research, followed by how the research can inform theory and practices in gifted and talented education, and ending with illustrative cases that demonstrate the application of the research to teaching/learning environments. The book has been popular in psychology and educational psychology courses and seminars. The book may be ordered directly from The National Research on the Gifted and Talented at (Malleable Minds).

 

STEM Schools of Excellence
The University of Connecticut and University of Virginia have completing the implementation of a study of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Schools of Excellence. The University of Connecticut created an extensive interactive matrix of STEM high schools around the country. From this matrix, 12 schools representing different service delivery models (e.g., school-within-a-school, residential school, magnet school, charter school, comprehensive high school) were selected for onsite observations, administrator interviews, teacher focus groups, and student focus groups. The purpose of the onsite visits was to obtain first-hand knowledge of effective curricular and instructional practices that may be unique to STEM schools. The information gleaned from a review of existing documents, websites, observations, interviews, and focus groups yielded multiple potential survey items that were organized and classified categorically to reflect the practices. Items became the basis for surveys for administrators and their teachers. Resulting data from the onsite data collection and surveys are the basis for multiple journal articles that are currently under review. In addition, we are creating an iBook on the status of STEM high schools in the United States and the link will be posted on our website upon its completion. The quantitative and qualitative data provide guidance for future and current developers of STEM high schools.

 

Status of Gifted Education Programming
The United States Department of Education commissioned the University of Virginia to conduct a national survey focusing on the status of K-12 gifted programming opportunities across our nation. Data from elementary, middle, and high schools will be used to develop portraits of the programming and services; to identify policy inputs (e.g., mandates, funding practices, teacher qualifications, program evaluation); and to provide accurate and comprehensive data to federal, state, and local policy makers as well as researchers and practitioners.

 

The research that we have conducted for over 2 decades required the cooperation and collaboration of administrators, teachers, and students from all over the country. We gratefully acknowledge the role that each person played in providing us with opportunities to collect extensive data on critical topics and report the findings to multiple audiences. Research teams associated with The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented continue to share their scholarly work at conferences as well as through books, book chapters, and articles. We hope you share our research with other interested educators involved with gifted and talented education by visiting our website for the latest information on meeting the needs of gifted and talented students.

The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented is funded under the Jacob K. Javits Gifted and Talented Students Education Act, Institute of Education Sciences, United States Department of Education      


Via Lynnette Van Dyke, Arjen van Walsum
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Waarom de schoolbel moet worden afgeschaft

Waarom de schoolbel moet worden afgeschaft | Talentontwikkeling | Scoop.it
Er zijn scholen die, binnen de mogelijkheden van de wet, flow de ruimte geven. Wat doen zij anders? Op die vragen zoek ik de komende weken een antwoord. Wie helpt me op weg?
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Twitter / TaalEnTalent: Bij @TaalEnTalent kun je terecht ...

Twitter / TaalEnTalent: Bij @TaalEnTalent kun je terecht ... | Talentontwikkeling | Scoop.it
Bij @TaalEnTalent kun je terecht voor de #LEREN LEREN Methode en begeleiding bij #hoogbegaafdheid. #onderwijs #033 http://t.co/hNP6HMwGXV
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The talent myth: How to maximise your creative potential - The Independent

The talent myth: How to maximise your creative potential - The Independent | Talentontwikkeling | Scoop.it
The talent myth: How to maximise your creative potentialThe IndependentOne theory, put forth by Dr Carol Dweck of Stanford University, is that the praise and attention prodigies receive leads them to instinctively protect their 'magical' status by...

Via Shary Lyssy Marshall
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Carol Dweck on developing creative talent | TalentDevelop

Carol Dweck on developing creative talent | TalentDevelop | Talentontwikkeling | Scoop.it

Carol Dweck, a Professor of Psychology at Stanford, writes about attitudes toward giftedness and developing creative talent - for children and adults.

 

She notes, "The word gifted can have a fixed-mindset feel. It suggests that intelligence or talent is simply bestowed upon children through no effort of their own and, by extension that it should flourish through no effort of their own."


Via Douglas Eby
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Douglas Eby's curator insight, July 8, 2013 2:21 PM

In her book Mindset: The New Psychology of Success, Carol Dweck considers two basic attitudes and paradigms about human ability and development.

Read excerpts in post: Carol Dweck on the growth mindset

http://talentdevelop.com/176/carol-dweck-on-the-growth-mindset/

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6 Secrets To Unlocking Your Child's Talent . Music & Arts . Education | PBS Parents

6 Secrets To Unlocking Your Child's Talent . Music & Arts . Education | PBS Parents | Talentontwikkeling | Scoop.it
Find out how you can nurture your child’s talent with six strategies from Daniel Coyle, author of the “Talent Code.” (RT @MusicParents: 6 Secrets To Unlocking Your Child's Talent http://t.co/DhDaXg1xKY...
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Start vandaag met onderwijs van morgen – Klaar voor de 21e eeuw ...

Start vandaag met onderwijs van morgen – Klaar voor de 21e eeuw ... | Talentontwikkeling | Scoop.it
VBSchrift Zet in op vaardigheden voor de toekomst - klaar voor 21e eeuw - JoostMaarschalkerweerd1 Welke vaardigheden hebben leerlingen nu echt nodig in de 21e eeuw? We zijn al dertien jaar in de 21e eeuw, maar nog ...
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