Talent in Tech
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Why Google doesn’t care about hiring top college graduates

Why Google doesn’t care about hiring top college graduates | Talent in Tech | Scoop.it
Google has spent years analyzing who succeeds at the company, which has moved away from a focus on GPAs, brand name schools, and interview brain teasers.   In a conversation with The New York Times' Tom Friedman, Google's head of people operations, Laszlo Bock, detailed what the company looks for. And increasingly, it's not about credentials. Graduates...
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How Netflix Reinvented HR

How Netflix Reinvented HR | Talent in Tech | Scoop.it
Business management magazine, blogs, case studies, articles, books, and webinars from Harvard Business Review, addressing today's topics and challenges in business management.
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How Google Uses Data to Build a Better Worker

How Google Uses Data to Build a Better Worker | Talent in Tech | Scoop.it

Googlers maintain a firm belief that insights from data can systematically improve performance and leadership within the company’s ever-growing empire.


Via Andrew Spence, Noémi Cselényi
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Andrew Spence's curator insight, October 13, 2013 3:43 PM

There is far too much hype in HR around Big Data.

HR need Big Hypotheses, not Big Data.

Great to read how Google starts every People Operations project with a question to answer.   And, over the last half-dozen years, the analytics team has produced significant insights that have:

  • helped limit the number of interviews required (company analysis showed that more than four interviewers didn’t lead to higher quality hiring),
  • revealed the optimal organizational size and shape of various departments,
  • shown how to better manage maternity leave resulting in a fifty percent reduction in defections,
  • created on-boarding agenda for an employee’s first four days of work that boosted productivity by up to 15 percent
  • and produced an algorithm to review rejected applications (Google gets over two million applications every year) that has helped the company hire some talented engineers its screening process would have otherwise missed. 
Tony Brugman (Bright & Company)'s curator insight, November 15, 2013 3:06 AM

Valuable Lessons Learned about getting to better HR effectiveness through HR Analytics at Google: "The goal is to complement human decision makers, not replace them."