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Books for your summer reading list

Our friends in finance share some of their favorite books for your summer reading list.
Melissa Triplett's insight:

LIttle video about how the Talent Code is a good book for infomation about brain science and how it is useful for personal finance, employment opportunities and training, as well as teaching and parenting.

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MainTakeAway: The LIttle Book of Talent by Daniel Coyle

In this video you will learn 50 tips to master any skill and/or talent you choose. By the end of this video, know how people become masters and how you can b...
Melissa Triplett's insight:

Too busy to pick up this book, but still interested in what's in it? This video is a great summary of the 52 hints/suggestions/tools that were inspired by The Talent Code.

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The Talent Code: How to Become Really Good at Anything - Author Video Interview

http://johnspencerellis.com/the-talent-code-how-to-become-really-good-at-anything The Talent Code book by Daniel Coyle author interview with John Spencer Ell...
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This is an incredible interview between two gurus!

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1-on-1: How Talent Is Made and Not Born

1-on-1: How Talent Is Made and Not Born | Talent | Scoop.it
Author Daniel Cole believes that talent doesn't just come naturally. Learn how supreme talent is made and not born.
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Interview with Daniel Coyle about Talent

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Practice makes perfect? - All In The Mind - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Practice makes perfect? - All In The Mind - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) | Talent | Scoop.it
The virtuoso violinist, star surgeon and super sportswoman - could any of us become the best of the best? Daniel Coyle toured the world's famous talent 'hotbeds' in search of secrets. Psychologist K.

Via Helen Chappel-Hayios
Melissa Triplett's insight:

No, Practice makes Permanent. You can practice a mistake just as easily as what's correct, and then it's just harder to undo. So make sure you've got it correct before you practice and repeat it.

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Natalie Jaeger's comment, July 19, 2013 12:20 AM
Great viewpoint, practice makes perfect, if you know what you're doing first...
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Repetition Repetition Repetition

Repetition Repetition Repetition | Talent | Scoop.it

In Daniel Coyle’s The Talent Code we learn the three rules of deep practice. 

Rule number two is Repeat It.


Via Alessandro De Angelis
Melissa Triplett's insight:

Even after you understand something, you cement your understanding by repeating.

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Mary Catherine Williams's comment, July 16, 2013 5:01 PM
I had no idea there was quite so much research on this topic! Daniel Coyle appears to be the current guru.
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A necessary struggle: Deep practice and skill mastery | SmartBlogs

A necessary struggle: Deep practice and skill mastery | SmartBlogs | Talent | Scoop.it

"'Struggle.' It’s a term we usually reserve for extreme situations. The struggle for freedom. The struggle for power. The struggle for survival.

 

The struggle to learn? Is this a struggle we should welcome?

 

Yes. After researching hotbeds of various talents, Daniel Coyle concludes in his book 'The Talent Code: Greatness Isn’t Born. It’s Grown. Here’s How.' that “deep practice” is a key to mastery and top performance. Coyle’s deep practice is characterized by:

 

Mindfulness.

 

A Brazilian boy learns a soccer move by trying, failing, stopping and thinking — a few attempts, then a pause. Coyle describes what precedes the boy’s breakthrough: 'He stops and thinks again. He does it even more slowly, breaking the move down to its component parts — this, this, and that.' Deep practice involves self-talk as the individual moves from articulating to executing each step. And self-talk requires slowing down: 'going slow helps the practicer to develop … a working perception of the skill’s internal blueprints — the shape and rhythm of the interlocking skill circuits.'"

 

Read More: http://smartblogs.com/?p=30078


Via Dennis Richards
Melissa Triplett's insight:

One of the key elements of talent development seems to be the willingness to make mistakes and the struggle to correct the mistakes you make.

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The science of talent: pinpointing what we will be best at - The Japan Times

The science of talent: pinpointing what we will be best at - The Japan Times | Talent | Scoop.it
The science of talent: pinpointing what we will be best at
The Japan Times
Society and education tend to hold the view that talent is innate, or at the very least has to be developed while young. While my personal ...
Melissa Triplett's insight:

Good discussion about what talent is.

 

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A presentation, by George

A presentation, by George | Talent | Scoop.it
(UPDATE on 7/29/2013: This talk was recorded and is available as a huge .mp4 file here.) George Siemens, one of the originators of the connectivist MOOC model, was on the MIT campus for a talk last...
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Interesting talk by George Siemens. Only his slides are given here, but there's some interesting data therein.

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Growing A Talent Hotbed: Dan Coyle at TEDxSitka

Dan Coyle is a contributing editor for Outside magazine and the author of three books, including the New York Times bestseller "Lance Armstrong's War." He ha...
Melissa Triplett's insight:

This is a great TED talk about talent and the new way to think about it.

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The Talent Code

The Talent Code | Talent | Scoop.it
Melissa Triplett's insight:

This is the home page for Daniel Coyle, Author of the Talent Code

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Mary Catherine Williams's comment, July 16, 2013 4:51 PM
Very interesting concepts presented in a wide variety of formats. I enjoyed the LeBron video!
Natalie Jaeger's comment, July 19, 2013 12:18 AM
Wow, this is a very new-aged approach to the way we learn. There are so many sources on the web that allow us to become our own teachers. Interesting points....
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What's the best way to learn from a book? - Barking up the wrong tree

What's the best way to learn from a book? - Barking up the wrong tree | Talent | Scoop.it

What's the best way to learn from a book?

 

Don't keep reading it over and over. Read it and write a one page summary.

 

Via Daniel Coyle's excellent book "The Little Book of Talent: 52 Tips for Improving Your Skills":

 

Research shows that people who (wrote a summary) remember 50 percent more material over the long term than people who follow (repeatedly read). This is because of one of deep practice’s most fundamental rules: Learning is reaching. Passively reading a book— a relatively effortless process, letting the words wash over you like a warm bath— doesn’t put you in the sweet spot. Less reaching equals less learning.

 

On the other hand, closing the book and writing a summary forces you to figure out the key points (one set of reaches), process and organize those ideas so they make sense (more reaches), and write them on the page (still more reaches, along with repetition). The equation is always the same: More reaching equals more learning.

 

http://www.bakadesuyo.com/whats-the-best-way-to-learn-from-a-book


Via ITTO online TEFL
Melissa Triplett's insight:

Great study hints from "The Little Book of Talent"

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Does Talent Really Trump Hard Work?

Does Talent Really Trump Hard Work? | Talent | Scoop.it

by Kristen Philipkoski, Gizmodo

 

In the apparent view of this piece, a small army of careful researchers and writers — including Malcolm Gladwell, Geoff Colvin, Daniel Coyle, Anders Ericsson, Carol Dweck, Angela Duckworth, Jonah Lehrer, David Brooks, ...


Via Parent Cortical Mass
Melissa Triplett's insight:

Is talent something that can be learned? Or is it only "God-given" or genetic?

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Natalie Jaeger's comment, July 19, 2013 12:23 AM
This article really makes me think about this question. What is more important: the talent we obtain or how hard we work to achieve something?
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The Talent Code, by Daniel Coyle

A trailer for Daniel Coyle's book, The Talent Code, which explains how talent grows in the brain, and how you can grow more of it. Included are a discussion ...

Via Huey O'Brien
Melissa Triplett's insight:

How can this discussion of physical talent development be extended to cognitive talent development, i.e. teaching!

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Huey O'Brien's curator insight, March 20, 2013 11:27 AM

IMPLICATIONS:  Learning Practice, Deep Learning

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Andy Murray's success proves that the scientific approach will only work if ... - Telegraph.co.uk

Andy Murray's success proves that the scientific approach will only work if ... - Telegraph.co.uk | Talent | Scoop.it
Telegraph.co.uk
Andy Murray's success proves that the scientific approach will only work if ...
Telegraph.co.uk
There was just one thing missing from my assault on Wimbledon 2014: talent. Well, that and youth.
Melissa Triplett's insight:

Counter argument that talent can't be just acquired by practice using research based methods. It's something more that Andy Murray had that allowed the practice methods to work on him to create a champion. Hmmmm.

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