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Talent and Performance Development
Making sense of performance and talent development systems to create & sustain high performance in organizations. For the BEST of the BEST curated news in performance, change, agile learning, innovation, motivation, social media and careers, SUBSCRIBE to Reveln.com/Tools/
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Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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3 Success Factors that Define High Performance Teams

"The findings on success factors for what rates highly in high performance teams may surprise you. It's not the usual leadership - trust - stable team mix."

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is the SlideShare of my recent JVS presentation on SlideShare. A full blog post article is coming with video, audio and a teams vs. psuedo-teams / groups handout.
 

Featured: High Performance Team Research Themes & Titles: Giver, Matcher, Taker Culture (McKinsey and Adam Grant), Positive/Negative ratio (what to start doing, stop doing suggested) Losada's and Fredrickson's research on team performance, positive organizational scholarship and emotional flourishing.  - Deb

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Navy SEAL Lessons For High Performance Teams

Navy SEAL Lessons For High Performance Teams | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it
Every person counts. And four other important rules to work by.


Excerpts:

Military culture is traditional, historically informed and fixed, whereas corporate cultures differ based on the leadership or other variables that oftentimes create challenges for employees at every level.


Military personnel have a clearly structured and transparent path to promotion, while in the world of business, there's often no defined career progression and the necessity for employees to manage their careers.


_____________________

Every SEAL knows with 100% confidence that the person behind him will be able to save his life. 

_____________________


It's clear that above all else, the Navy SEAL’s functional and effective teamwork is among one of its top strengths. SEAL insights could, and should, be applied to working teams in business.


Excerpts from the article:
 

Every person counts. 

Every SEAL knows with 100% confidence that the person behind him will be able to save his life. Corporate leaders need to be able to say the same about their management teams. Employees’ livelihoods depend on it.


SEALS train. 
When SEALs are not on combat deployment, they spend the vast majority of their time in training. In contrast, executives spend the majority of their time executing. The importance of training for new employees, or even a veteran team, is vital to the success of the business. Navy SEALs spend thousands of hours honing their skills, and so should employees in a profession.


Everyone is expendable. 
All SEALs are trained in a nearly identical manner, so no one SEAL is indispensable to the unit or the mission. The understanding during combat is that anyone can be lost at any time and the rest of the unit can carry on the mission successfully. Businesses need to ensure contingency plans are in place ...so the team can carry on without any delays.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

It's a different model for high performance.  From a place of tradition, it challenges corporate tradition.  Succession planning AND management are important.  Few have truly prepared for succession management.  ~  D

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What Can Swarms Teach Us About Teams and High Performance?

What Can Swarms Teach Us About Teams and High Performance? | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

"Do you want your organization to behave in a more collaborative way? For better results, try taking some cues from nature."


The notion of “swarming” to assemble a cross-functional or cross-departmental team, could be considered a key factor in an organization’s ability to develop and thrive.


Gartner described a work swarm as a “flurry of collective activity” to deal with non-routine workplace problems or opportunities. Without this option, organizations can fall short in their quest to respond to stressors (or opportunities) in quickly changing internal and external environments.


....Building a pipeline of talent is imperative with swarming – but this should be developed in a manner that is meaningful. Mapping the skills and strengths of potential team players within relevant industries, becomes a critical goal.


Furthermore, teaming applications (like Jostle), can also help document the evolving skill sets of potential contributors.


Related posts by Deb:


    
    
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

If you want to jump start an exploration of swarming, look at large group methods  that are swarm friendly, including Open Space Technology - photos here.


Also, this article reminds me of the Membership, Control, Goal simple model that helps create movement & synergy in a team.


I'm encouraged by organizations looking seriously into swarming support and creating more  permeable boundaries around formerly rigid roles.   ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, August 22, 2013 10:23 AM

Agile Learning include teams including flexible, adaptable conditions, vs. more rigid hierarchies, that allow teams to develop.  ~  D

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, November 7, 2013 11:07 AM

A post that gathered interest  right away on the Talent and Performance Development curation stream.  Note the key aspect, "non-routine" workplace problems or opportunities. "


Don't we all have these?  Are we ready to respond to non-standard events, "anti-fragile?"


From  Talent and Performance Development, which also features recent articles on performance metrics and management (reinvention.)

~  Deb 

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What's Deadly about Workplace Hierarchy, Developing Performance

What's Deadly about Workplace Hierarchy, Developing Performance | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

“[Hierarchies] are not very good at mobilizing effort, at inspiring people to go above and beyond.” Gary Hamel   ...hierarchy is a relic. ...It slows communication...decision-making...input. It discriminates against new talent and advocates for the familiar. .....Fresh ideas are stifled in hierarchies.
 

Hierarchies were useful to control employees when they could be easily replaced. Today it takes more than holding a job to motivate employees. They want to unleash their strengths, apply their passions and work alongside others who do the same

In time, rigid hierarchies...controlled by personality at the top will be outdone by nimble organizations that give power to teams. This ...shift gives the competitive advantage to businesses that leverage the collective talents of their people. ...organizations cannot thrive...with outdated structures that celebrate the individual at the top of the pyramid.
    

It’s more than seeking employees’ inputs, however. Replacing hierarchy means putting employees at the table co-creating solutions with managers, if they exist, to drive business results.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Performance and talent management systems tend to exist now embedded in hierarchical systems.  Talent & performance development requires something quite diffferent, unhinged from industrial age systems, as the author implies. ~  D

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It's about those Managers: What Performance Management Systems Needs Most ~ Gallup

It's about those Managers: What Performance Management Systems Needs Most ~ Gallup | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it
Most companies invest heavily in systems that identify, recognize, reward, and retain their top performers. But they're only as effective as the managers who implement them.


Excerpted:

...Employees who gave their managers "best" ratings found the performance management system to be much more effective than did employees who gave their managers "below average" ratings.


  • Seventy percent of employees who gave their managers "best" ratings rated their performance management system as "very good."
      
  • In contrast, only 2% of employees who rated their managers as "below average" gave their system a "very good" rating.

 

...Companies that want to increase organizational and employee performance and productivity should invest in getting the right managers in place and support them in engaging their employees.


Related posts by Deb:


    
     



Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

No surprises here:  This harkens back to Frederick Herzberg's dissatisfiers list, in order of "dissatisfaction." 

  • policy
  • relationship with supervisor
  • work conditions
  • salary


On the broad level, it continues to stand the test of time.  A companion article in Change Leadership Watch highlights a company with no managers.  Imagine!  


It brings a new viewpoint to the era of hierarchy changing or even ending.  ~  Deb

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MeritShare Announces First Winners of "Best People To Work With" Award

MeritShare Announces First Winners of "Best People To Work With" Award | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it
6 companies were selected from over 400 companies to receive the "Best People To Work With" award from MeritShare.


MeritShare celebrates the first round of winners of the "Best People To Work With" award. The awards are given to companies who demonstrate high levels of employee participation in peer-to-peer recognition.


______________________________

"With the competition fierce for great talent, the timing ...of this award is very important for us to retain and recruit the best people." ~ Marla Schimke, Zumobi VP of Marketing 

______________________________


The companies were selected from over 400 different companies, ...who enrolled in MeritShare's peer-to-peer recognition program.


MeritShare announced the following 6 award winners:


Beachmint, First Rehab Life, Green Hasson Janks, SchoolSpring, Trophies2go, and Zumobi.


"We are thrilled to have received this award", says Jeff Anderson CEO of Trophies2Go and board director for the Awards and Recognition Association. Anderson adds, "Happy employees mean great customer service and that's great for business, we are putting the award on our website and in our own showroom."


The type of recognition can vary by company, and the defining characteristic of peer recognition is that the award nomination is made by co-workers and peers as opposed to supervisors and managers.


In Seattle, the "Best Company To Work For" winner Zumobi offers a "Thanks with a Z" award and in Los Angeles, "Best Places To Work" Green Hasson Janks's employees give a "Encourage New Ideas" award to foster creative thinking.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Peer-to-peer recognition software is gaining acceptance in some companies in the US.  Another is KudosNow.com.  I'll also share news on Skillrater.com soon billed as, "The world's first 360-degree assessment program built on a social networking platform. Get rated. Get better. Get noticed."


Are these all a good thing?  Will they improve performance or are they red herrings that distract from the natural tensions that persist in corporations?  ~  D

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High Performance Teams (and Marriages): The Ideal Praise-to-Criticism Ratio

High Performance Teams (and Marriages): The Ideal Praise-to-Criticism Ratio | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it
It's the secret to high-performing teams -- and strong marriages.


The research, conducted by academic Emily Heaphy and consultant Marcial Losada, examined the effectiveness of 60 strategic-business-unit leadership teams at a large information-processing company.



________________________

The factor that made the greatest difference between the most and least successful teams,..
.was the ratio of positive comments to negative comments...nearly six positive comments for every negative one.

________________________


"Effectiveness" was measured according to financial performance, customer satisfaction ratings, and 360-degree feedback ratings of the team members.

The factor that made the greatest difference between the most and least successful teams, Heaphy and Losada found, was the ratio of positive comments

  • ("I agree with that," for instance, or "That's a terrific idea") 

to negative comments 

  • ("I don't agree with you" "We shouldn't even consider doing that") that the participants made to one another. 
The average ratio for the highest-performing teams was 5.6 (that is, nearly six positive comments for every negative one).

The medium-performance teams averaged 1.9 (almost twice as many positive comments than negative ones.)

_________________________

..Only positive feedback can motivate people to continue doing what they're doing well, and do it with more vigor, determination, and creativity.
_________________________

But the average for the low-performing teams, at 0.36 to 1, was almost three negative comments for every positive one.

...Only positive feedback can motivate people to continue doing what they're doing well, and do it with more vigor, determination, and creativity.

Perhaps that's why we have found with the vast majority of the leaders in our database, who have no outstanding weaknesses, that positive feedback is what motivates them to continue improvement. In fact, for those in our database who started above average already (but are still below the 80th percentile), positive feedback works like negative feedback did for the bottom group.

Focusing on their strengths enabled 62% of this group to improve a full 24 percentage points (to move from the 55th to the 79th percentile). 
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

First scooped to the Art and Science of Motivation, it also belongs in the Performance category.  Enjoy! ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, August 1, 2013 8:18 PM

This refers to some classic research from M. Losada & Heaphy on connectivity in high performance teams.  This research about positive and critiquing feedback ratios (and the volume of the positive feedback) seems right on target from the 1998 studies.  ~  Deb

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How To Follow a Topic on ScoopIt > Click!

How To Follow a Topic on ScoopIt  > Click! | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Click the 'follow' button at the top, right of this page.

 

Trying to find posts on a particular topic? Click 'filter' tab above and choose an area of interest.

 

Thank you in advance for aligned topic suggestions and your 'thank yous!"   I appreciate it!


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, July 24, 2013 10:27 AM
Cool tool. Thanks. Gotta share it. :-)
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, July 24, 2013 10:27 AM
Cool tool. Thanks. Gotta share it. :-)
Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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Pay For Performance: Innovation Killer?

Pay For Performance:  Innovation Killer? | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it
Talent Management magazine, The Business of Talent Management


Pay for performance is effective for employees in operational roles, such as a painter painting houses or a salesman hitting quotas. But when it comes to employees responsible for finding creative solutions to problems, the model is ineffective, said Gustavo Manso, co-author of a 2012 study published in the July issue of Management Science.


...a straight pay-for-performance model does not have a tolerance for early failure, a component essential to innovation, said Manso, an associate professor of finance at the University of California at Berkeley.


Innovation is a “trial and error process,” Manso said. “You have to try things that you don’t know if they’re going to work.”


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I scooped this originally to "Innovations & Institutions:  Will it Blend?" and am sharing it here due to the Pay and Performance theme. ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, July 25, 2013 1:08 PM

There are also cultural components to tolerance for failure.  


Also, performance and pay are linked in many, though not all performance systems.  It is how they are linked, (soft link, dotted line, one factor among others, or direct links / primary factor) that sends a message that affects extrinsic and instrinsic  (Alfie Kohn, cited), and churn (stay or go) in organizations. ~  D

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One year later, SAP hasn't blown it with SuccessFactors - Fortune Tech

One year later, SAP hasn't blown it with SuccessFactors - Fortune Tech | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it
But software giant SAP has set ambitious goals for its cloud unit. Can it reach them?


SuccessFactors CEO Lars Dalgaard now leads the company's entire cloud business (with the exception of business commerce network Ariba, which remains independent).


To help him oversee the new business unit, Dalgaard recently hired two new presidents


The verdict so far:  

"With SuccessFactors now officially folded into the larger company's cloud business unit, a growing leadership team that reports to Dalgaard, and sales people who are actively selling both traditional and cloud-based software, we may soon find out whether that bet will pay off."

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

So far, so good.  Remember though, it is a way of automating performance management, connecting it with big data, not fundamentally changing it or asking the big questions, "Why?" and "For what purpose?"  ~  D

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Classic: How to Give Good Feedback, Beyond Appraisal

Classic:  How to Give Good Feedback, Beyond Appraisal | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

"...Human nature hasn't changed - few of us enjoy hearing about our shortcomings, and few of our bosses and colleagues look forward to describing them.


Part of the problem is that work itself has changed - it's more team- oriented, less individualistic. The tougher it is to measure individual performance, the tougher it is to evaluate it."

___________________________


The tougher it is to measure individual performance, the tougher it is to evaluate it."

___________________________


Parkview Medical Center in Pueblo, Colorado ...explor[ed] how best to modify the hospital's existing checklist-based reviews: Which ratings made the most sense? Which scoring systems worked best? But no amount of tinkering satisfied Parkview's leaders.


Dorothy Gill, vice president of human resources, and a team of her colleagues explained their dilemma to the CEO: "He said, 'If there isn't a better way to do reviews, let's just stop doing them.' So we did. 


Gill and her colleagues eventually came up with an idea. It's called APOP, for Annual Piece of Paper. The most valuable kinds of feedback, they concluded, are the daily interactions between leaders and their people - interactions that can't be captured on paper.


The hospital still requires that managers do annual reviews. But instead of being top-down appraisals, the reviews are bottom-up requests for assistance: What can the leader do to make the employee's job easier? What gets in the way of accomplishing the job?


___________________________

There are no scores, no written goals for the next year....  the...process "takes performance reviews and turns them upside down." 

___________________________


And the medium for those reviews is conversation, not written evaluation. There is a form - the APOP. But its only role is to confirm that the conversations took place. There are no scores, no written goals for the next year.


It's literally a piece of paper, signed by the employee and the director, that records the date, place, and agenda of the meeting. The APOP process "takes performance reviews and turns them upside down," Gill says. "Directors don't tell employees how they're doing. They ask open-ended questions to see what will help employees do a better job."


photo: by felipe.cabrera, Flickr CC 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is a classic article from way back, 1998, that is still fresh and current today on the topic, with many relevant business examples and practice tips.  


Parkview Medical Center is still around.  Hospital reviews are available via US News and World report.  They are placing as one of the top 11 hospitals in the state for several health practice areas.  ~  Deb

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Top Challenges Facing Organizations over the Next Decade - SHRM perspective

Top Challenges Facing Organizations over the Next Decade - SHRM perspective | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Is there REALLY a talent shortage?

Yes...a very controversial topic...some say we do, others wonder how we could have a shortage with such high unemployment.

....About the same number of qualified candidates apply for the job... mixed in with 20 applications or 200 applications....with only 1 or 2 of them fully qualifying.


Top trends?

According to the SHRM survey. With 483 HR executives reporting, here are what they say (just a few of the results)...


________________________

...to the employee, the supervisor IS the organization...

________________________


1.  Retaining and rewarding the best employees
... they show up, very excited to begin their new endeavor, disappointed to find that the pay raises are inadequate, employee morale is low, gossip is high, integrity is questionable, workload is greater than expected, and overall a work environment that is not employee-friendly.

... It may not be an organizational issue...it may be isolated to the supervisor. ...to the employee, the supervisor IS the organization...and if that is what they experience, that is what they will use as the basis to find new employment and to tell other people about their experience with your organization.

2.  Developing the next generation of corporate leaders
...We often wait to train employees until they are in the management position...which sets us behind as the new employees typically don't have the tools they need to be successful from the start.


....By providing a development plan a couple years out, we can train up and coming managers the right way. ...more than simply creating a succession matrix... identify individuals who can fill those future roles.

3.  Creating a corporate culture that attracts the best employees to the organization


4.  Remaining competitive in the talent marketplace



___________________

....it is EASIER to develop current talent than to find new talent. 

___________________



5.  Finding employees with the increasingly specialized skills we need
...a steady decline in STEM students (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) and STEM related positions. We are also lacking in other skills that typically set us apart in the United States...such as problem solving, leadership, decision making, competitiveness, etc.


....it is EASIER to develop current talent than to find new talent. This goes back to ...finding the core talent that already exists in the organization and developing it further for additional roles. 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Is it about coming in with the skills needed (the talent shortage?) our about hiring for capability and capacity?  

It's good to see what SHRM provides from trend surveying and put it in perspective with other data, including hiring, succession management (not just a matrix), motivation science (not as evident here), pay and culture.  ~  D

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Four Major Flaws of Force Ranking - i4cp

Four Major Flaws of Force Ranking  - i4cp | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it
Forced Ranking or "The Vitality Curve" -  This isn't comparing apples to apples; it's like comparing apples to bacon.

The chart above are the results from a recent i4cp study on performance rankings, published in  Performance Management Playbook: Managing Critical Performance Challenges, showing a sharp decline in both forced rating and forced ranking since 2009.  

  • Two-thirds of companies that did utilize these practices abandoning them - from 49% in 2009 to 14% in 2011.
  
i4cp's list of shortcomings of force ranking includes:
 

Companies unwittingly give a huge boost to the competition.

..when Microsoft jettisons their presumed lower-performing employees, they are providing the competition with fresh talent

   

The bottom 10% isn't always the bottom 10%.

An employee who is in the bottom 10% in a high-performing department might rank much higher when compared to employees in a different department that has lower overall performance. Why should that employee be let go when he or she outperforms those in other fucntions? This isn't comparing apples to apples; it's like comparing apples to bacon.

   

Forced ranking can be an engagement and innovation killer.
    
Related posts by Deb:

     

   




Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Dick Grote is still touting forced rankings (in a modified way, but still rank & remove) in his articles and books on performance appraisal and performance management.  

The i4cp consulting group offers reasons why it's not working in 2012.  ~  D

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6 Game Findings: High Performance Teams > Leadership & Decision Making

6 Game Findings: High Performance Teams > Leadership & Decision Making | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

"6 critical differences between top performers and the rest in the areas of leadership and decision-making."


Finding 1: Top Performers avoided the "Presumption of change" trap.

Evidence for Finding 1: Even though the game starts with each team inheriting a business from the previous executive team 95% of the participants showed no curiosity regarding how successful the previous leadership team had been and why!


...almost all new leaders focus on what they need to change but not what they need to preserve.


What to change is only part of the challenge and for whatever reason (ego, identity, peer pressure ...) showing a lack of respect for the previous team's achievements seems to be a good predictor of sub-optimal performance.


Finding 2: Top Performers suspended assumptions, thoroughly reviewed all available instructions/background research and actively sought out any available expert input.
 

Evidence for Finding 2: Senior teams or functional experts generally did worse in the game than expected and junior teams/non-functional experts generally did better than expected.


As people become more experienced and competent they often become more fixed on their "Golden Rules" ("this always works" or "never do this"). [These] can also close people down to a fresh examination of the facts available to them.

In many cases the evidence which was available would have directly challenged these golden rules if it had been properly and objectively evaluated.


Read the full post  for more.


Related posts by Deb:

      


   

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is an insightful list of provocative high performance team insights, different than the usual laundry list of "strong leadership," "stable teams," and, of course, a certain measure of "trust."  ~  D

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Djebar Hammouche's curator insight, September 4, 2013 12:06 PM
6 Findings: High performance team Leadership and Decision Making
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Business & Talent Building: Problems With Incubators, and How to Solve Them

Business & Talent Building: Problems With Incubators, and How to Solve Them | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

"Financing isn't success, and office space isn't value...  there are over 7,500 business incubators around the world. Most of them fail."



The first business incubator in the U.S. opened in 1959 and is still operating. In the last couple of years, we have seen a renaissance in the incubator business. Pioneered by YCombinator, Silicon Valley's flagship incubator led by Paul Graham, incubators have come back with a vengeance.


____________________

...incubators ...need to overcome two pitfalls: they need to provide real value, not just office space, and they need to measure success in more than just outside funding.

____________________

YCombinator has seen some significant successes...[and] has fueled ...an incubator bubble.... Incubator are now a global phenomenon, and there isn't a major city in the world where an incubator isn't cropping up.


For incubators to live up to their full economic potential, they need to overcome two pitfalls: they need to provide real value, not just office space, and they need to measure success in more than just outside funding.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

A management quote I have adapted seems to fit here: "If it can be measured with the right measures at the right time with the right tools and by the right people, it can lead to new productivity, motivation and high performance."  

Ownership of good data can power incubator success, entrepreneurial spirit and innovation.  ~  Deb

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Research team systemic learning

"...one early response chastised us for being 'too ambitious'...Why is it that corporate entities can have ambitious plans but researchers are expected to think in isolated minutiae? "


Excerpted from the blog post:


Why not start with an open system rather than adding openness on as an afterthought once systems are already established?


To address the need for openness of platforms, algorithms and ensure that the learning process remains a key focus, a group of us have proposed the development of an open learning analytics architecture/platform.


We’ve posted our (beta) vision online: Open Learning Analytics: an integrated & modularized platform (.pdf). 


We are interested in hearing from, and partnering with, others – researchers, educators, universities, schools, startups, and corporate partners (learning and development departments).


We have submitted several grant applications and have a few more that will be submitted in the next six months (one early response chastised us for being “too ambitious”. I solidly reject that assertion. Why is it that corporate entities can have ambitious plans but researchers are expected to think in isolated minutiae?


Researchers need to think in systems and platforms in order to have an impact).

 

Source:  Envisioning a system-wide learning analytics platform ~ George Siemens December 8, 2011 Shanghai, China


Related posts from Deb:



Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Leadership research by the famed Warren Bennis established that many "Great Groups" in history are staffed by younger people who tend to be more innovative and less constrained criticism of what can't be done.  

This  Open Learning wiki and this SlideShare seem to "solidly reject" such constraints.   


Kudos to them and us for reading about and paying attention to these Agile Learning concepts and working to make an impact in data-driven learning - making it real.  ~  Deb 

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Three Reasons Performance Management will Change in 2014 & Beyond

Three Reasons Performance Management will Change in 2014 & Beyond | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Key Change for High Performance? => An agile, social and mobile work environment."


Excerpted:

Activity lists are being replaced by composite dashboards, lengthy reports by simple performance heat maps – yes, pictures, literally replacing thousands of words.


____________________________

A shift in focus from process to outcomes. Burn the forms.

____________________________


Key Change for High Performance?


A shift in focus from process to outcomes. Burn the forms. With technology finally up to the task of producing meaningful information, managers can turn their attention to driving performance outcomes rather than being bogged down in laborious processes.


Excerpted:

  • You will set dynamic goals and adjust them in response to change;
   
  • your manager will provide just-in-time coaching wherever you are;
   
  • skills and knowledge you need will be recommended and streamed to you;
   
  • your performance journal will continuously capture and cluster feedback, ideas and suggestions from your peers and customers;
   
  • your formal annual performance review will be permanently deleted from your calendar…and
    
  • you will finally be in a position to manage your own career.

 

As always in our ScoopIt news, click on the photo, video or title to see the full version of the Scooped post.

    

Related posts by Deb:

    

   
     

 

  • Stay in touch with the monthly Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  9 multi-gold award winning curation streams.  Preview it here, via REVELN Tools.

        

  • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.  


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Refresher:  There's hope that the old management activities of the past, tied to Taylor's industrial age, are finally waning, aiding letting go of the annual performance appraisal aided by useful tech tools like "heat maps."  ~  D

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Why Line Manager Coaching Often Doesn't Work and What to Do About it.

Why Line Manager Coaching Often Doesn't Work and What to Do About it. | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Shifting the focus of change from the line manager alone, to the team as a whole ~ and overcome problems with the manager retitled as a coach.

Excerpts:


Here’s a typical story: Peter was away from the office for three days. Most of the team thought he’d been on a business trip, but when he returned, he was keen to tell them about the course he’d been on. “From now on,” he told them, “I’m not just the team leader. I’m the team coach. Instead of telling you what to do, I’m going to help you work things out for yourselves.”


At first, members of the team were bemused – one commented behind his back “I don’t know what pills he’s been taking, but I’d quite like to get some!”. Then they became irritated, with a sense that they were being manipulated.


...For both coach and coachee, coaching is hard work, both intellectually and emotionally – and neither may have signed up for that. So any opportunity to opt out may be seized upon with both hands.

A study by Stephen Ferrar, for Oxford Brookes University, identified a range of behaviors and habits by line managers and their teams, which exacerbate the problem.


Among these are:


  • The tendency for managers and direct reports to fall into “parent-child” roles in any conversation
   
  • The sense that both parties may have hidden agendas (for example, on the manager’s part about their plans to reorganize the team and on the employee’s part about how long they intend to stay with the company)
   
  • Conflict between the employee’s desire for some things to remain confidential and the manager’s accountability for the welfare and performance of the team as a whole
   
  • Conflict between pressure to deliver short term task objectives and the longer term development needs of team members
   
  • Groupthink. People, who work together, tend to adopt the same filters on the world around them and have the same blind spots.   Paradoxically, the better the relationship between line manager and learner, the more likely this is to be the case.


 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The experience I've had with the external coach role is that the manager has Power, Authority, Accountability and Responsibility (usually all 4) that can easily interfere with the coaching role.   David Clutterbuck's concept of teaming to counteract this is very much worth exploring, yet power issues will usually surface via manager roles of those in positions of power in a team.  ~  D

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10 Ways to Change Performance Management Circa 2013 ~ Bacal

10 Ways to Change Performance Management Circa 2013 ~ Bacal | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Ten shifts that are necessary to modernize and update how we manage performance.


Excerpts:


1) Negotiating Goals and Objectives, Not Dictating


3) Individualizing Expectations Even For Employees Doing The Same Job

Each person ....bring their unique strengths to the job. So, people in the same position often do quite different things, and should be ...recognized for their unique contributions.


4) Managers Understand Employee Engagement Can Be Fostered Through Proper Management of Performance

Performance management is THE tool to help establish meaning of work, because it helps employees understand how their jobs fit into the whole.


Managers need to understand, also, that the reliance on rating forms for evaluation is a waste, and tends to squash employee engagement.


8) Recognize Employee Performance Is Not Always Under Their Control and Focus On The System

...much ...of what employees do is dictated and influenced by the environments they work in. ....discuss ALL barriers to employee performance, ...and move to remove those barriers.


9 ) Human Resource Departments Need To Enable Managers, Not Insist On Conformity

Human Resources (HR) needs to enable managers by providing them with a variety of tools, rather than dictate a one-size-fits-all system that is imposed upon managers and staff.


- See more at: http://performance-appraisals.org/Bacalsappraisalarticles/articles/tenways.htm#sthash.NdhA5cod.dpuf


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I've been following Robert Bacal for more than a decade.  For those ready to begin to take initial steps to let go of outdated performance practices that have low ROI, this is a helpful site and guide.  

He is also of the ilk of behaviorists including Aubrey Daniels.

For those who want to make the big leap, Robert Bacal's approach would be more incremental change, not transformational.    For those perspectives, stay tuned.  


~  Deb

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2013 Performance Appraisal Report Card, #Infographic

2013 Performance Appraisal Report Card, #Infographic | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

A "Performance Evaluation Report Card" inforgraphic showing the overall ratings participants gave their organizations, as well as the 3 worst mistakes evaluators make when conducting performance appraisals.


Infographic: 2013 employee performance appraisal practices - Human resources News on Performance Appraisal


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

It's good to see some light at the end of the tunnel regarding pay practices linked to appraisal.  However, we've got a long way to go to move beyond old-school appraisal practices, based on the way the these survey questions were constructed and answered..  ~  D

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Performance Review: I'll try harder! I'll try smarter! Humor

Penny is under-performing at work. Typical Penny.  "About those lunch breaks,"  I don't think it's working out,"  "You've said this before."  

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The script is classic.  It is well-known to managers and HR staff who are following progressive discipline.  So it is aboiut more than a peformance review, tongue in cheek, perhaps about highing younger and younger?  (You think?)

Besides the humor, it is about evidence and pattern, the script, and emotional sidetracks.   ~  Deb

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SuccessFactors Reviews

SuccessFactors Reviews | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

SuccessFactors, an HR software firm has been purchased by software giant SAP in 2013.  Via the Glassdoor reviews, it doesn't seem the merger is going so well in 2013 internally, though externally, all seems fine.   This "things are fine" stste is being reported via bloggers attending Success Factors presentations at conference, with non-disclosure agreements in tow.
 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

In a companion ScoopIt, SAP has not "messed up" Success Factors  (an HR system automation company)...at least, not yet.  This series of employer reviews on Glassdoor by new and current SuccessFactors employees (now working for SAP) is a cause for pause.     


Not using your own products, like Success Factors for their own HR, would be one sign that the merger is more about selling and less about quality and alignment with company values, for which they do tout quite a few via company slogans about transparency and "don't leave our wounded behind."  

A sample of different 2013 current employee reviews includes:  

  • "Hypocrite culture," 
   
  • "The company has grown so fast," 
   
  • "This is a culture of lies, fear and manipulation," 


and,


  • "Telling workers to get out if they raise issues which they feel should be addressed is not rational."


                                                                                  - Deb



 

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Classic: The Top 50 Problems With Performance Appraisals

Classic:  The Top 50 Problems With Performance Appraisals | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

 In 1996, Frederick Nickols estimated the cost at just under $2,000 per employee. ...includ[ing] manager preparation time, employee time, HR processing time, opportunity costs, and advances in technology, still puts the process cost at over $2,500 per employee per year.

Partial list of the 50 Problems cited.


Most Serious Performance Appraisal Problems


1. Don’t assess actual performance — most of the assessment that managers complete focuses on “the person,” including characterizations of their personal “traits” (i.e. commitment), knowledge (i.e. technical knowledge) or behaviors (i.e. attendance). While these factors may contribute to performance, they are not measures of actual output. If you want to assess the person, call it “person appraisal.” Performance is output quality, volume, dollar value, and responsiveness.


2. Infrequent feedback – At the very minimum, formal feedback needs to be given quarterly, like the GE process.


3. Non-data-based assessment — most assessment criteria are “fuzzy” and subjective.


4. Lack of effectiveness metrics — many accept that the goals of the process are to recognize results, provide feedback to address weaknesses, determine training needs, and to identify poor performers. Unfortunately, rarely do process owners ever measure their processes’ contribution to attaining any of these goals. Instead, the most common measure relating to performance appraisal is the percentage completed.


5.  Lack of accountability – ...One firm attempting to remove a troublesome employee found that the manager had rated the individual the highest within the department and awarded them employee of the year.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The comments on this blog post are also very helpful.  Look at Robert Bacal's contributions in particular, as well as consider the recent, "Beyond Performance Management"book that delves into the "Why" of any system including performance management.  ~  D

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Out of the Chaos: Talent and Performance Management Meets HCM with a Cool Tablet Tool

Out of the Chaos:  Talent and Performance Management Meets HCM with a Cool Tablet Tool | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

The biggest miss for most organizations in the previous chaos was the connection between their workforce management, payroll, or HCM systems and their recruiting, succession, development, and planning processes.


 ...the ability to physically integrate a series of talent management processes on a proprietary but open platform device is potentially (bold mine, DN) a game-changer, 


At its annual customer forum this week, Ceridian  ...threw its hat into the integrated talent management ring, and from a strong position. ...Ceridian is rolling out more strategic, less transactional modules over the next couple of years, including succession planning, compensation and rewards, and performance management.


Related posts by Deb:

    
   


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Systems are developing to a higher level than just record keeping & financials.  Analytics lessons from social media, e.g. Google, Facebook and YouTube analytics, have paved a path to get good as well as in-depth (Google) information, data input tools (devices) and data feedback to people.


IS this a GOOD thing?  Welll....  It may simply be the same old, same old repackaged into a shiny app on a tablet.  Success Factors is the partnership with Ceridian on the tool. 

The video on Ceridian's website features their payroll & timekeeping functions mainly.  It's pretty spiffy, for that. ~  D

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Kohn, Herzberg and Pay: Challenging Behaviorist Dogma

Kohn, Herzberg and Pay:  Challenging Behaviorist Dogma | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Alfie Kohn's contribution to performance management, Pay-for-Performance and performance based organizations is well said in this short paragraph featuring the classic work of Frederick Herzberg, author of, The Motivation to Work.


Excerpt:


_________________________

The jazziest, most expensive and elaborate comp system ever devised can never do anything other than ...take you only to the baseline, the zero point.
 

_________________________


Frederick Herzberg's career was devoted to proving the following revolutionary principle: just because paying people inadequately can be demotivating doesn't imply that paying people better (or more skillfully) will be motivating.


The jazziest, most expensive and elaborate comp system ever devised can never do anything other than prevent some problems.


It can take you only to the baseline, the zero point. And if you become preoccupied with the topic, it can distract you from attending to what can move an organization forward -- projects such as meeting people's needs for autonomy, relatedness, and competence

From:  articles by alfie kohn


Photo:  by 401(K) 2013 Flickr


Related articles by Deb:

    


 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I have been convinced about Kohn's approach through my experience of seeing what makes the difference in large, complex organizations.  

Setting the "stars" or "community" question aside, based on hire-fire values, what really creates motivation is never, ever, ever going to be first about the pay for most people in the long view.  


Unless you happen to not mind, or prefer turnover and churn in the ranks, this point of view is worth a serious look in research as well as performance and talent development decision making.  ~  D

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