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3 Success Factors for High Performance Teams, and What Gets In the Way

3 Success Factors for High Performance Teams, and What Gets In the Way | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Leadership today has evolved greatly.  Our systems for supporting high performance and leadership in teams and in entire organizations has not kept up with the times."


See the article, SlideShare and videos here.

Excerpts:

At a recent workshop with JVS in Southfield Michigan, I shared some of the research and practical organization experience I’ve collected on high performance teams.
 


As we hear of findings and new development from “big data” AND “small data” (highly personalized, tracked), it is also good to explore how access to performance data can inform leadership at all levels and encourage team achievement and speed, especially when old practices that slow and interfere with performance are removed.


Also keep in mind the differences between true teams vs. psuedo-teams  and groups.  Many project and task groups are assembled as teams to accomplish a charge or purpose.    Sometimes these groups or teams: 

  • produce an innovation or breakthrough success for their organizations,
  • are formed based on a favorite interest or pet project idea of an executive that, in hindsight, provides limited value to their organization.    
    
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Besides research, this article includes my  interview findings of what stops performance dead in its tracks, including fresh insights from an interview of a millennial, a 25 year old, describing her work experience after graduating from college in 2010.    ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, September 10, 2013 5:39 PM

This is one of my own posts featuring research on emotional space in high performance teams as well as the positivity / negativity ratios in such teams.   What do you think?  ~  Deb

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Adobe’s New Approach to Abolishing the Yearly Performance Appraisal: The Details

Adobe’s New Approach to Abolishing the Yearly Performance Appraisal: The Details | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Adobe is blazing a trail.  Rosemary Arriada-Keiper, Head of Rewards at Adobe reviews several of the compensation details of their new program.


1)  Has Adobe completely done away with performance appraisals (evaluating past performance)?

Rosemary: Yes, we no longer have performance appraisals.  While we still believe we need to evaluate performance, we believe this should be done on an on-going basis through regular feedback provided during “check-ins”.  These are on-going discussions between employees and managers about goals, status against them, what is working, what is not, whether goals need to be modified or reprioritized given the environment, etc.   ...These “check-ins” are not written. ...We encourage at a minimum that "check-ins" happen quarterly but we typically see monthly in practice.


2) Has Adobe completely stopped giving performance ratings?
 

Rosemary:  Correct, we no longer provide a rating.  ... because of  “check-ins” both managers and employees should have a very good sense of performance by the time managers need to make compensation recommendations.

4)   You mention there are rewards for key talent.  How are key/high performers selected...? 


Rosemary:  We have a separate process for that whereby discussions about key talent happen with leadership in the respective organizations.  We do identify who they are and they are “tagged” in the system as Key Talent (yes/no) but no rating per se. 

Key talent receives stock although occasionally they get cash.  Both managers and individual contributors are eligible.  The total pool is no more than 2% of the employee population.
 

5)  What has been the response from both managers and employees about this change in program?

 

Rosemary: Very positive. There’s lots of relief around not having to write annual performance reviews and label employees a certain way.  That said, the conversations managers have with their employee has had to shift from “these are the guidelines given to me by HR [to} push[ing}  managers to own their decisions and be able to articulate them (and defend if challenged). 


Related tools & posts by Deb:

      

  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streamsfrom @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here, via REVELN Tools.

         

              


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Adobe made a huge jump away from their reviled stack ranking system, a move that even raised their stock prices.  

These are four (4) highlights from a longer article by Compensation Café shows how the revamped review, now called "check-in" without documentation, and the compensation system is now handled at Adobe.   Gone are the rankings, the yearly appraisal and ratings.

According to the head of "Rewards" at Adobe, it's been received quite positively.  

~  Deb

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18 Things Highly Creative People Do Differently

18 Things Highly Creative People Do Differently | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Creativity works in mysterious and often paradoxical ways. 
      

Neuroscience paints a complicated picture of creativity, far more complex than the right-left brain distinction would have us think (the theory being that left brain = rational and analytical, right brain = creative and emotional).

     

....psychologically, creative personality types are ... complex, paradoxical and tend to avoid habit or routine. ...not just a stereotype of the "tortured artist" -- artists really may be more complicated people.

    

Scott Barry Kaufman, a psychologist at New York University who has spent years researching creativity, [said], "Imaginative people have messier minds."

   

Excerpts from the full list of 18:
     
They daydream.   Creative types know that daydreaming is anything but a waste of time.   ...mind-wandering can aid in the process of "creative incubation." ...from experience [we know] that our best ideas come seemingly out of the blue when our minds are elsewhere.

    

They observe everything.

Henry James is widely quoted, a writer is someone on whom "nothing is lost."
    
They take time for solitude."In order to be open to creativity, one must have the capacity for constructive use of solitude. One must overcome the fear of being alone," wrote the American existential psychologist Rollo May. 

     

They turn life's obstacles around.  Specifically, researchers have found that trauma can help people to grow in the areas of interpersonal relationships, spirituality, appreciation of life, personal strength, and -- most importantly for creativity -- seeing new possibilities in life.

     


They take risks.


.... "Creativity is the act of making something from nothing. It requires making public those bets first placed by imagination. This is not a job for the timid. Time wasted, reputation tarnished, money not well spent -- these are all by-products of creativity gone awry."


    


They make time for mindfulness.


Creative types understand the value of a clear and focused mind -- because their work depends on it. Many artists, entrepreneurs, writers and other creative workers, such as David Lynch,  have turned to meditation as a tool for tapping into their most creative state of mind.


Related tools & posts by Deb:

      

  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here, via REVELN Tools.
          
       

         


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

It's helpful to see this 2014 version of what distinguishes creatives, updated with mindfulness practice, yet listing daydreaming in the first, #1 spot.  The article offers a quote from the writer Joan Didion's notebook , "We are talking about something private, about bits of the mind’s string too short to use, an indiscriminate and erratic assemblage with meaning only for its marker."  ~  D

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Robin Martin's curator insight, March 6, 7:14 PM

Thanks for sharing this, Deb! Loved it!

Christi Krug's curator insight, May 6, 8:11 AM

I can relate to this! "Imaginative people have messier minds."

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Classic, Systemic Performance Insight > Better: A Surgeon's Notes on Performance

Classic, Systemic Performance Insight > Better: A Surgeon's Notes on Performance | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Why the best doctors are so good, and how the rest can learn to improve.  These are useful, classic lessons for all of us in better understanding performance, both individual and systemic.


Excerpts:


Gawande divides the essays into three sections — “Diligence,” “Doing Right” and “Ingenuity” — based on the components “for success in medicine or in any endeavor that involves risk and responsibility.”

Each essay focuses on a problem — the importance of hand-washing, health care delivery in India, the role of physicians in executions — that Gawande uses to anchor wide-ranging reflections.

...Gawande shows us that hand-washing turns out to be a profoundly complex and... that the moral obligations of physicians to death-row patients are not as clear as life and death, and that providing care to the poorest in the world takes a degree of ingenuity that should be categorized not simply as “better” but as downright heroic.


Related tools & posts by Deb:

      

  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here, via REVELN Tools.

         

              

      
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I highly recommend this well written collection of insightful performance stories.   

Gawande demonstrates how focusing on patients, performance and the big picture, the system, leads to improvement for people and the profession.    So much change fails, as he illustrates, without systemic intervention and peer-to-peer learning and engagement.

He uses history, story, numbers and his own experience to provide compelling insights useful to understanding systems thinking in performance.  

His early examples and accounts of of controlling infection in hospitals provides an excellent view of how difficult it is to make changes in systems, and that it also is possible, and heroic to affect change with the right approach as well as dogged determination. ~ D

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, February 20, 11:19 AM

The book isn't new, but its insights into improving performance is compelling in using case examples for how challenging it is to help  change take hold in complex, resistant to systems - even when the intent to change is strong. ~ D

Richard Platt's curator insight, February 25, 6:39 AM

This is also an excellent example of how to understand and create Use Cases.  


The original curator of this scoop, Deb from Revelyn Highly recommended this collection of insightful performance stories.  

Gawande demonstrates how focusing on patients, performance and the big picture, the system, leads to improvement for people and the profession.  

He uses history, story, numbers and his own experience to provide compelling insights useful to understanding systems thinking in performance.  His early examples and accounts of of controlling infection in hospitals provides an excellent view of how difficult it is to make changes in systems, and that it also is possible, and heroic to affect change with the right approach as well as dogged determination.

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Championing Limited Metrics and Low Power Culture: Results, High Profits

Championing Limited Metrics and Low Power Culture:  Results, High Profits | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Svenska Handelsbanken has championed an entirely different way of doing business, and has the profits, loyalty and longevity to prove that it works.

Three years ago, stock market analysts at Sweden’s main business paper set about using data from the London School of Business to find the world’s best performing share since the start of the 20th century.

The answer? Handelsbanken. Ten pounds invested in the Swedish bank in 1900 would have been worth about £20m by 2009, a rise of 1.9m pc. General Electric could manage only an 843,000pc rise.
 

And if you think the fruits of this astonishing return were limited to an elite club at the bank, you would be wrong.

Handelsbanken has an almost religious devotion to Oktogonen, its profit-sharing scheme. ...Every employee receives an equal share of the bank’s profits as long as it makes a return on equity greater than the average of its peer group.

   

__________________
   
..branches ....scrutinise [head office] costs. If they are not happy...they make sure the head office ups their game...

     
__________________

      

The money is then used to buy Handelsbanken shares for each staff member but these can be accessed only when employees reach the age of 60. This ultra-equitable approach means the bank teller whose career is spent cashing cheques will receive the same payout from Handelsbanken on retirement as its chief executive.


Afew other differences:


- It does not pay bonuses, with the exception of a small number of staff in its investment banking arm;
 

- It has no financial plans;
 

- The bank sets no sales targets for staff;
 

- It does not set out long-term goals and has no central marketing budget;
 

- Even its largest corporate customers must still bank with it at a branch level, and it has no credit scoring system.
 

...Anders Bouvin, UK chief executive explains....branches decide the costs of the head office. They scrutinise our costs. If they are not happy with the service, they make sure the head office ups their game...[or]...go elsewhere. The branch manager is the king of the bank,” he says.


Read the full post here.   Read more about the unusual 28 year career of Anders Bouvin, here.

   

Related tools & posts by Deb:

    

  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here, via REVELN Tools.
     
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Sometimes numbers can be a trap.   This is one of two posts featuring this unique, profitable bank that has outperformed MANY competitors.  ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, February 18, 4:46 PM

This is a companion article, featuring the graphic shared by Niels Pflaeging on LinkedIn who mentions that  ...."companies like Handelsbanken have ....value creation and informal structures [that] are far more well-curated and developed than in command-and-control organizations."

~  Deb 

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Multitasking Makes Managers Less Thoughtful and Students - Multi-media Messes

Multitasking Makes Managers Less Thoughtful and Students - Multi-media Messes | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Chronic multitaskers have a harder time with everything.

Research on electronic devices at meetings from Stanford from Clifford Nass's Communication Between Humans and Interactive Media Lab clearly indicate that those who engage in media multitasking are unable to ignore irrelevant information and have difficulty identifying which information is important.


Even watching that stream of type crawl across your television screen during the evening news makes you less likely to retain information from either the program or the crawl. 


Source:  Harvard Business Review 


From another source, The Week:

In a recent TED Talk, Nass explains how college students "triple and quadruple-book media." He says, "When they're writing a paper, they're also listening to music, using Facebook, watching YouTube, texting etc."
     

To see what impact this has on their brains, Nass tasked 262 college students with completing three experiments that examined different aspects of multitasking: Switching quickly from one task to another, filtering out irrelevant information, and using what is called "working memory," an aspect of short-term memory that allows you to hold multiple pieces of information in your mind.
     

The results? Chronic multitaskers have a harder time with everything: Telling what information is relevant, managing working memory, and ignoring irrelevant information. 

         

Source:   Theweek.com/article/index/250739/chronic-multitasking-makes-us-worse-at-everything

Related posts & tools by Deb:


            

         

 


Photo by EraPhernalia Vintage Flickr 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Multitasking is increasingly being shown, in research, to be ineffective and inefficient.  It's time to remove it as a boilerplate addition to job descriptions.  It dates the  job description and the organization using it.  ~  D

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, January 31, 8:09 PM

It's time to remove "must be able to multi-task" from 2014 job descriptions.

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Our Dangerous Obsession with "Vanity Metrics" and External Recognition

Our Dangerous Obsession with "Vanity Metrics" and External Recognition | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Our LinkedIn connections, speaking engagements, and press profiles should be seen as rewards for the value we create, not the actual process by which value is created.


If you’re too focused on these “vanity metrics,” you risk painting an all-too optimistic picture of yourself without accurately identifying, measuring, and improving the underlying drivers of your performance.

    

___________________________

     

 “Strive not be a success, but rather to be of value.” ~ Albert Einstein

    

___________________________


...Instead of measuring your progress using the yardstick of external recognition, focus on achieving your vision first, and you’ll be more visible than you can imagine.


...people who tap into their deep intrinsic motivations are much more (PDF) likely to succeed on long-term projects and hit loftier goals than those who are powered by the praise of others.

Related posts & tools by Deb:



Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This article lends perspective to overdoing the visibility factor in social media and in professional networks & in using speaking gigs.  What do you actually contribute via Vision and Desired Outcomes, to make a difference?  ~ D

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Richard Platt's curator insight, December 12, 2013 3:39 PM

Interesting article, and much of what it states is true however we are not so sure that it's going to change a lot of people's behavior though.  We have always beleived that character counted more than being a character, but its good to be both though....;-)

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Stretch Goals, Pay for Performance Boondoggles: Why Goal Setting Doesn't Work

Stretch Goals, Pay for Performance Boondoggles:  Why Goal Setting Doesn't Work | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

"Goal setting doesn't work."  There are times it can be helpful, but as a performance tool, reconsider.


Goal behavior:

  • 34% of Americans are overweight and a further 34% are obese.... Despite the proliferation of weight loss programs that usually focus on weight-loss goals. ...the problem may be inherent in the validity of goal setting.

  • Recent neuroscience research shows the brain works in a protective way, resistant to change. Therefore, any goals that require substantial behavioral change or thinking-pattern change will automatically be resisted. ...When fear of failure creeps into the mind of the goal setter it commences a de-motivator with a desire to return to known, comfortable behavior and thought patterns."
     
  • Aubrey Daniels, author of, Oops! 13 Management Practices That Waste Time and Money, ...cites a study that shows when individuals repeatedly fail to reach stretch goals their performance declines. Another study showed 10% of employees actually achieved stretch goals. 
     

The authors of Goals Gone Wild, [identify] negative side effects associated with goal setting: "An overly narrow focus that neglects non-goal areas; a rise in unethical behavior; distorted risk preferences; corrosion of organizational culture; and reduced intrinsic motivation."


Related posts & tools by Deb:



Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Well, if "distorted risk preferences; corrosion of organizational culture; and reduced intrinsic motivation" isn't enough to question goal-setting practices of yore, then perhaps the status quo is a bit too comfortable to challege this performance myth.  


~  Deb

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Talent Development: Do We Need HR Departments?

Talent Development:  Do We Need HR Departments? | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

If HR doesn’t deliver some unique benefits then outsourcing it makes a lot of business sense.


Other companies, however, have invested in the ‘people function’. They realize that they need people who ensure that the company finds, recruits, retains and develops its people. 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The author's provocative article has stimulated 1000+ comments in just a few days.  How HR is viewed is also a reflection or microcosm of the clarity and integrated condition of the company's mission, vision, performance approach and culture of valuing (or not valuing) people.

From the commentary on this piece, 'before we talk about all the strategic HR staff, no one will listen or care unless you pay them right."   I find this to be true in my own work with performance management over the years.

Good structure, fair compensation, and HR not overstepping its bounds providing performance management "advice" is important.  


~ Deb

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Grammy-Nominated Musician Uses Songwriting To Foster High Quality Connections, to Do Your Job Better

Grammy-Nominated Musician Uses Songwriting To Foster High Quality Connections, to Do Your Job Better | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Grammy-nominated songwriter and Bob Dylan's son-in-law Peter Himmelman uses the techniques he mastered as a veteran rock n’ roller to create momentary connections between people that open up organizational creativity and help people overcome fear and risk-aversion so common in organizations.


Professor Jane Dutton's work with High Quality Connections, HQCs, is included.  


Related posts & tools by Deb:


        

           

    

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

It's great to read of Jane Dutton's work, at work, in a new context with music.  Creativity, the magic of music and high quality connections go together, naturally.  The work application is marvelous and useful!

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Time Off, Development & Training is Less Important ~ It's about Whole Life at Work

Time Off, Development & Training is Less Important  ~ It's about Whole Life at Work | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

"A study shows that work-life balance might not have much to do with employee engagement."

     

U.S. employees, despite their relatively poor work-life balance, are more emotionally invested and focused on creating value. Does that mean U.S. employees don't value work-life balance? Hardly.

According to a recent Glassdoor survey,

      

  • 72 percent of American employers feel that vacation, sick time, and holidays are extremely important to their job happiness, 
   
  • behind only health care (76 percent), which admittedly, is mostly a U.S. issue.
    
  • Only 27 percent of workers felt that development and training was an important workplace issue.


...What does this all mean? Probably that time off isn't truly as valuable to our happiness as we think it is, and ...meaningful work is more valuable.


______________________

time off isn't truly as valuable to our happiness as we think it is....meaningful work is more valuable.
 ______________________


Look for ways to say yes, give feedback, and encourage employees to contribute in meaningful ways. Don't manage by rules alone. Do these things, and you'll find you have an engaged workforce that does much better than most of those in the U.S.



Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Meaningful work also means happiness at work.  In trying times, work is a lifeline to many.   That is why joblessness creates tremendous turmoil.  

Also Scooped to The Art and Science of Motivation.  ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, November 18, 2013 9:31 AM

Meaningful work translates to happiness in other definitions. That is why this is listed on a Motivation curation stream.  


Do you agree that meaningful work is #1 and that development and training is of lower value?   ~  Deb

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, December 11, 2013 12:55 PM

Are you investing in the right benefits for what really matters to your employees?  Meaningful work = happiness by other definitions. 


If meaningful work is #1 and development and training is of lower value, what are the implications for the talent in your organization?


From The Science and Art of Motivation news.  ~  Deb

Sharrock's curator insight, May 1, 12:14 PM

This kind of information has implications for knowledge work environments, including school classrooms. Staying engaged and motivated are two issues important in classrooms as well as in the training of staff.

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Talent and Performance Development

Talent and Performance Development | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

"Every job is a self-portrait of the person who did it. Autograph your work with excellence."


~ Ted Key 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This quote is usually misattributed, as listed here.  Ted Key, an American cartoonist and writer  (1912-2008) did a series of posters.  This particular illustrated saying achieved popularity.

It is quite appropriate to Talent and Performance Development's curation stream.


The saying has been frequently cited, but Key has rarely been credited. 


Wikipedia: Ted Key 
Ted Key, born Theodore Keyser (August 25, 1912 – May 3, 2008), was an American cartoonist and writer. He is best known as the creator of the cartoon panel Hazel, which was later the basis for a television series of the same name. 

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Creativity and Innovation IRONY: Sample Performance Review Phrases

Creativity and Innovation IRONY: Sample Performance Review Phrases | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

From Deb -  copy and paste your creativity and innovation performance review phrases here:

  • Emma’s ability to change direction when required is an asset to the team.
  • Tom is an innovator at heart – his skill at inspiring new ideas is an asset to our team.
      
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:
Consider:
  • Creativity,
  • Innovation,
  • Performance Reviews.  


One of these is not like the others.

Is this the best we can do, capturing stock phrases from a book to get us through the performance review ritual?   There is research on the Innnovation & Institutions curation stream that creativity, displayed to your co-workers, actually makes people squirm.

The photo with this excerpt is ironic because, if you read most of what I Scoop or post on this stream, you'll see that creativity and innovation does not lend itself to be captured by an industrial age vintage practice that pretends to be effective at facilitating performance management.


Major issues:
     

The numbers are dismal for the practice, though we keep trying to fix it (companion ScoopIt on this curation stream).

    
Managers need continuous training deal with wide variation in their feedback and appraisal practices in order to attempt to create consistency in ratings.  
    

Staff largely dread the practice, although they hope for good data and feedback to help them succeed in their work.

    

Overall, the return on investment for this embedded organizational practice is low, to the point that the end of performance reviews is predicted by one of the people who first coined the term, Aubrey Daniels.


Slideshare here:

From Chaos to Creative Performance Development in a VUCA World (Ending Performance Appraisals)

   

~  Deb

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Photo-Blog: What's Happening with HR in Michigan

Photo-Blog:  What's Happening with HR in Michigan | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

This is a link to what's been happening in Michigan with HR events and learning in 2013.   A number of the photos, especially those with the tag MISHRM  (on Flickr photo sharing) are connected to blog posts by topic.




Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is a bit of an experiment - an HR photo blog.  Let me know via DebNystrom@Reveln.com if you found it helpful, or via the comments below.  ~  Deb

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Develop your Talent, Sponsor a Workshop during International Coaching Week in May

Develop your Talent, Sponsor a Workshop during International Coaching Week in May | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Experience timely, current workshop topics  during International Coaching Week ~  May 19-25, 2014  - sponsored by the International Coaching Federation (ICF).

Coach Café Ann Arbor is offering to selected local leaders pro-bono workshops and coaching from some of the top coaches in the Ann Arbor and South East Michigan area (Flint and Detroit included.)
 

Why? We want to create awareness of the return on investment of coaching, as well as offering to you new educational partnerships in a win-win opportunity.  


______________________
   
We must always change, renew, rejuvenate ourselves; otherwise we harden.
~ Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe

______________________


Here’s the business case for professional coaching.  Of all clients who have engaged a coach,

  • 99% report satisfaction with the coaching experience,
  • 70% report improved work performance,
  • 80% report increased self confidence,
  • 68% individuals report financial return on investment,
  • 80% companies report financial return on investment.



For South East Michigan and Ann Arbor, check out our local website here featuring ICW sample workshops here.   See photos from last year here.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is a great win-win talent development opportunity for your leaders, staff and faculty.  Coach, consultant biographies are also listed on the website and on the ICF Michigan website, as well as the national site for the International Coaching Federation.

Now is a good time to reach out to one of the coaches and plan some workshops and coaching demonstrations for this special May event.   ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, May 6, 1:13 PM

Add freshness to your company workshops experience and coaching by local, professionals.  Contact a coach listed on the main, local website here:  http://coachcafeannarbor.weebly.com/

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Wirearchies = Adaptive, Two Way Flow of Power, Knowledge, with a Focus on Results

Wirearchies = Adaptive, Two Way Flow of Power, Knowledge, with a Focus on Results | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Harold Jarche features Chee Chin Liew’s presentation on moving from hierarchies to teams at BASF.  It shows how IT Services used their technology platforms to enhance networking, knowledge-sharing, and collaboration.  


It features an approach to “building flows of information into pertinent, useful and just-in-time knowledge” so that...  knowledge can flow in order to foster trust and credibility.

      

______________________________

    

In complex environments, weak hierarchies and strong networks are the best organizing principle.   ...It means giving up control. 

   

_______________________________
       
Creating this two-way flow of dialogue, practice, expertise, and interest, can be the foundation of a 
wirearchy.

In complex environments, weak hierarchies and strong networks are the best organizing principle.


....many companies today have strong networks...coupled with strong central control. Becoming a wirearchy requires new organizational structures that incorporate communities, networks, and cooperative behaviours. It means giving up control. The job of those in leaderships roles is to help the network make better decisions. 



Related tools & posts by Deb:


See the companion post about Holacracy, here.

           

  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here, via REVELN Tools.
        

          

      

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Harold Jarche highlights several useful models featuring two way information flow through power and authority. which helps build, if the culture allows it, adaptability into knowledge work.  


As quoted in the article, much of this work has been "routinized and standardized with the ongoing marriages of business processes and integrated enterprise information systems."  This makes for a fragile system susceptible to disruption.  

Building robust, two-way flows is essential to enable adaptability to the realities of continuous change and learning organizations ready to embrace disruption.  ~  D

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, February 26, 11:50 AM

Holacracies, wirearchies and feedback rich cultures are one of the key ways organizations can adapt to disruptive change, or so it is beginning to look.   It will take solid leadership to change the nature of control and power in new millenium organizations, with unconventional larger organizations. like Zappos, leading the way.  ~  D

Helen Teague's curator insight, March 6, 10:46 AM

well worth the reading time.

BhanuNagender's curator insight, March 7, 4:26 AM

 Manufacturers of Custom Shaped Cold Air Inflatables including Giant Character shapes and  Product Replicas also Rooftop Balloons specializing in custom inflatables for advertising, manufactured in Hyderabad city, India - http://www.inflatablecostumes.com

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What is your Clock for Change? Coaching with the iWam, Work Attitude & Motivation

What is your Clock for Change?  Coaching with the iWam, Work Attitude & Motivation | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

This excerpt features the assessment tool, the iWAM, which reveals ‘change’ patterns as motivational patterns and shows us what our ‘Clock’ for change looks like.  iWam = the Inventory for Work Attitude & Motivation

The iWAM “Clock” answers the question ..."After how many years one needs a significant change to be motivated again?"

Learning about a top-performer’s need for change allows us to plan for the time when burnout would set in so that we can prevent it and retain our top talent.


The information from the Clock also helps us make better career decisions and work-life planning.


From the iWam website:


The iWam is based on a model of cognitive thinking styles (48 parameters are measured and explained). The iWAM Management Report identifies a person's motivational and attitude preferences in the job context and predicts how this person will behave in various job types, such as administrative, customer contact or managerial tasks.

The 
iWAM Attitude Sorter predicts key motivational preferences and development areas. The questionnaire can be administered over the Internet or as a pen-and-paper test. The iWAM is currently available in more than 15 languages. Test administration takes 25 to 45 minutes.


Source: http://www.theiwam.com/the-clock


Photo by deux-chi, Flickr


Related tools & posts by Deb:

    

  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here, via REVELN Tools.


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The iWam is a moderate to advanced assessment instrument that is useful for looking at work attitudes and motivation.  Samples of iWam reports are here


~ Deb

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Social Business Tools Are Transforming the Way We Work & Give Feedback

Social Business Tools Are Transforming the Way We Work & Give Feedback | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Social business, the use of social network platforms for workplace communication and collaboration, is new... ...Some businesses are harnessing the power of social platforms to facilitate workplace productivity.


__________________
   
Consider the transformation when co-workers replace one-to-one emails with group collaboration.
   

__________________


... first entries include Yammer, Rypple, and NationalField in 2008. Saba released its first social networking solutions for HR in 2009, and Mango Apps, 7Geese, and Globoforce came along in 2010.


Yammer, acquired by Microsoft, originally described itself as “Facebook for business.” Rypple, bought by Salesforce.com and rebranded as Work.com, gives companies an online motivational and coaching tool. Globoforce invites supervisors and peers to encourage each other with positive feedback, including digital badges and rewards.

     

[These] tools of social business field are leading to a new level of organizational transparency.   ...Consider the transformation when co-workers replace one-to-one emails with group collaboration on a social platform. A worker in Charlotte asks a question, a colleague in London answers, a team member in Shanghai provides clarification, and many other employees are brought along for the ride. With social tools, employees pool their knowledge and get the work done.
      

Social tools also act as new platforms for performance appraisals that are relevant and positive in real time. Work.com offers the option of anonymous feedback, which the company says is easier to give and receive. Saba’s Pulse funnels social feedback into a company’s formal review process. Adobe Systems, on the other hand, has done away with traditional performance reviews and has replaced it with its own new platform, Check-In, for informal real-time responses.

...

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Be careful what you ask for, you just might get it.  Those staffers who've asked for more transparency from their administrators, could find themselves out in the open, ready to shine or ready to run away once social collaboration fully meets the light of day.  

I for one am very curious to learn of how Adobe Systems, using Check-in, may be making progress with reinventing performance review and dealing with the problems of individualistic feedback, as all of us work as part of a system, reference, W. Edward Deming's "Red Bead Experiment."  Stay tuned, it may be a bumpy ride, and it could be a transformation of better understanding human performance is in store.  ~  D 

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Hire & Fire is Different at Holacracy®-Powered Companies

Hire & Fire is Different at Holacracy®-Powered Companies | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it
In a typical top-down management structure, the power to hire and fire employees is generally in the hands of managers.


With the decentralization of authority, the separation of people and role, and the dynamic evolution of those roles, [its] more like free agents going about their work with no central planning.  This then begs the question: who can decide how and when to hire or fire?


Holacracy doesn’t answer that question; it simply gives you a framework and processes for your company to figure it out. 


Brian Robertson — designed a 3-Tier Partnership App to answer a different question: “How can we account for the difference between partners deeply committed to the organization, and those for whom the commitment is lesser and more temporary?”


  • It separates “partnership commitment” from financial compensation.
    
  • It defines three tiers of partners: Standard Partner, Tenured Partner, and Core Partner. Each tier requires a higher level of commitment to the organization, and in return offers a higher level of commitment from the organization.
     
  • It was designed for a relatively small organization.
    
   

Related posts & tools by Deb:



                
       

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Social media is an artifact of a new age, choice driven, commitment oriented.  Holacracy is at the cutting edge of how this looks in adaptive organizations that thrive on flatter, open structures.   It's an open question:  Will it scale?


Comparing and contrasting holacracy used at a biggger company, Zappos, is on my companion Change Leadership Watch ScoopIt here entitled:


Zappos is going Holacratic: No Job Titles, No Managers, No Hierarchy

~  Deb 

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Never Say Never? Ratings & Frequency Scales for Performance Feedback

Never Say Never?  Ratings & Frequency Scales for Performance Feedback | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Take a second look at the validity of ratings, especially frequency scales for Performance including multi-rater feedback.


Excerpts:


[There are] …challenges of creating reliable/valid measurement when …relying on input …from observers of his/her behavior….[specifically] the rating scale that is being used.  


_______________________

    

“Always”....doesn’t mean they do it well.   …conversely...Rarely or Never doesn’t mean they are bad at it.

    

_______________________

     

…the rating scale’s effectiveness is likely to be directly affected by the quality of rater training….often neglected beyond …basic …written instructions. 

     

In [David Bracker's] webinar, [he] shared a list of a dozen or so various rating scales that I have encountered over the years, all in a 5 point format.  

     

…The 3D Groups recent benchmark study of over 200 organizations that use 360 feedback that, by far, the 5 point scale and the Likert Agree/Disagree format are used more often than any other scale type.  

    

…this practice is a form of laziness in 360 designers who haven’t reflected long or hard enough to consider scales that work better when the target is a specific person and not some nebulous entity like an organization [as with an] engagement survey.

    

….frequency scales (typically 5 point scales…ranging from Never to Always)…continue to be widely used…[and are] conceptually flawed. People can’t do everything “Always” (or even Almost Always…)  …because they do something “always” doesn’t mean they do it well.   …conversely, because they do it Rarely or Never doesn’t mean they are bad at it. 


______________________  

    

Frequency scales are used far too frequently.  They should be used Never.

    

______________________

    


...frequency scales severely penalize supervisors who do some things infrequently but are otherwise perceived to be effective.

     

…Research by Kaiser and Kaplan (2006) (that you can access here:http://kaplandevries.com/thought-leadership/list/C44)...demonstrate that frequency scales are, by far, less satisfactory when compared to Evaluative and “Do More/Do Less” scales.


Frequency scales are used far too frequently.  They should be used Never.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

David Bracker's post helps clarify a number of issues with performance ratings.
 

I’ve found in certain settings, a simple scale with description: Do more of, Stay the Same, Do Less of” with perhaps three to five items takes a group further, especially in “tender” groups, those who may have limited trust and openness. In such groups, making the “do less of” voluntary, helps to some degree, particularly if it is seen as an honest option, with no pressure to participate in “improvement” feedback.    ~  D

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The New HR Organization is a Talent Machine 2014

The New HR Organization is a Talent Machine  2014 | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

"HR 2014 Future Trend findings by Bersin of Deloitte Analyst based on interviews with organizations on the Future of HR."


Excerpted:


1. Talent Management Defines HR


Microsoft's recently announced they've done away with forced ranking. ...HR's role was to spearhead this change - beyond the basics (payroll, employee relations, time and attendance, compliance.)  The basics are NOT enough to be competitive.


2. Integrated Talent Management Has Shifted to Optimized Talent Management.   ... "Optimization" = how can they better compete to attract, retain, and engage their aging workforce?


3. HR Business Partner Roles Have to Change Dramatically

This item features a special performance consulting group...of five senior HR specialists (staffing, OD, learning, labor relations) working on special talent projects. They diagnosed a problem in one unit as a lack of employment brand in one of the areas they serve. They worked with the recruiting team to build a local, highly tuned employment branding program - with internships, local universities and new sourcing tools - to gain access to engineers. Within a few quarters the problem started to go away.


Could a generalist have done this without a lot of help? Unlikely.


4.  Business Thinking and Data Are Now Critical to Success

...build talent analytics and workforce planning capabilities so [HR] can prove that we're delivering impact.

Photo: gilmorec Flickr cc


Related posts by Deb:

Choices for High Performance Teams, Groups and Psuedo-Teams: Achievement Is How You Say It

     

Beyond Resilience: Givers, Takers, Matchers and Anti-Fragile Systems

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I'd define the 2014 term as Talent Development.  Traditional management techniques are changing too.  Many of the bigger companies, including Microsoft as cited in this article, have been slow to change.  Mid-size  and more agile large companies have long ago dropped forced rankings, for example.


Mid-size and larger companies are also building in Business Intelligence, data access that is accessible by more than the traditional management / leadership elite.  This is also changing the nature of business.

Bersin's views capture approaches already in place in leading companies, the exact point of this curation stream.  ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, December 11, 2013 1:08 PM

I'd define the 2014 term as Talent Development.  Traditional management techniques are changing too.  Many of the bigger companies, including Microsoft as cited in this article, have been slow to change.  Mid-size  and more agile, adaptable large companies have dropped forced rankings long ago.


Mid-size and larger companies are also building in Business Intelligence, data access that is accessible by more than the traditional management / leadership elite.  This is also changing the nature of business.

Bersin's views capture approaches already in place in leading companies, the exact point of this curation stream.


From Talent and Performance Development 

http://www.scoop.it/t/talent-and-performance-development 

news.   ~  D

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The Performance Preview, an Alternative to Performance Review

The Performance Preview, an Alternative to Performance Review | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Management consultant and UCLA professor Samuel Culbert offers a solid alternatives to problematic performance review practices in his 2008 book “Get Rid of the Performance Review:” 


  • In chapters 7 and 8, I offer the alternative—the performance preview. It’s as simple and elegant as it is successful. It does all the things performance reviews are supposed to do but don’t. 
      
  • In the end you will see what many of you already know in your heart: that mainstream management is embedded in, and relies on, a culture of domination—and that the performance review is the biggest hammer management has. 
      
  • You will see how the review destroys our spirit, as well as our corporate performance. You will see how the same people who created this sorry mess have the power to undo it. And you will see that there is a way to fix it, if only we have the courage.
     
Related posts by Deb:
    
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

"If only we have the courage," is a key observation by Culbert.

Risk-aversion, low courage, and avoidance is a malaise that can affect segements of, or even entire corporate cultures.  

Key points of Dr. Culbert's frank writings include:  

  • separating compensation from performance reviews, 
  • taking a look at the role of hierarchy to include that of a boss asking  “how can I help you achieve your best?” 
  • ending low value pratices like ranking and ratings.

     ~  Deb
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Actions Speak Loudly: Corporate Values that Mean Nothing

Actions Speak Loudly:  Corporate Values that Mean Nothing | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

"What does your company stand for? Go ahead, look around you; check out the published mission or values statement. Take a moment to read it. Now do a gut check.  ... Did you disdainfully roll your eyes?"


Here’s a thought: what if every time leaders did something counter to their company’s values, their noses grew? Like the famed puppet Pinocchio, ...when a misguided decision was flying in the face of what your company stands for?


Whimsical, yes, but wouldn’t it be effective? The offenders would be immediately called out to account for their actions.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Often truth telling, calling espoused values to consciousness when bossism and "rank and yank"  (forced distribution of performance reviews), poor management skills, and other bossisms  emerge is a risky business, especially in non-profits, known for low investments in leader and manager performance development.


Dilbert actually has done one, if not more "nose growing" comic strips dealing with the misalignment of values and management / leader actions.    

Who's courageous enough to call these out?   Does it happen in your organization?   ~  Deb

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Performance Management Reinvented: Five Factors for Success

White Paper:  Performance Management: Five Factors for Success By Russ Silva, EVP Enterprise Solutions, LSA Global.


Related posts by Deb:
     

Curing ONE of the Seven Deadly Diseases of Management, Performance Appraisals

       


A History of Performance Appraisals: Letting Go to Power New Culture

       


Choices for High Performance Teams, Groups and Psuedo-Teams: Achievement Is How You Say It!

   

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Pros:  Correctly identifies the wide-spread corporate cultural problems of boss-ism.  


Cons:  Has a Taylor-esque (Industrial Age) management and staff flavor of thinkers and doers.    


Silva covers a lot of ground in a few pages and gets to the nuggets of talent and performance development problems in performance management.  ~  Deb

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Are Annual Performance Reviews Like the Hotel California? You Can Never Leave?

Are Annual Performance Reviews Like the Hotel California?  You Can Never Leave? | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

[The] diosyncratic seasonal events [for] HR .... the annual performance appraisal:

       

  • They are time-consuming, involve too much paperwork
           
  • HR would even do better to drop them altogether and find a better performance-management tool. 
       
  • ...Management consultancy Hay Group found half of public sector workers and one-third of business leaders describe appraisals as a box-ticking exercise. 
      

A recent US poll of 2,677 people (1,800 employees, 645 HR managers, and 232 CEOs) by San Francisco-based rewards-and-recognition consulting firm Achievers revealed 98% of staff find annual performance reviews unnecessary.

    

  • Among the 2,677 respondents, a quarter were HR professionals.

    

Edward Lawler, professor of business at University of Southern California, reacted by declaring: "Performance appraisals are dead." But he also unveiled research showing 93% of companies use annual appraisals, and only 6% have considered dropping them.

   


- See more at: http://www.hrmagazine.co.uk/hr/features/1075041/is-performance-appraisals#sthash.0mC4cbEW.dpuf

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The song by the Eagles, regarding our long ties to performance reviews:  "You can check out any time you like, but you can never leave."

In this post, it's useful to read the comments, most of which are about still attempting to tweak performance management systems.


A final commenter suggests:

"...The fundamental false assumption is that performance is due to the people when research and case studies show that it is due almost wholly on the system, i.e. the way the work works.

Replacing appraisals with a different approach frees people to do what they really want, deliver better service, reduce costs and increases morale. What more do you want!"

As for who is actually doing this, stay tuned.   ~  Deb 

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Conquering Fears of Giving Feedback by Karen May of Google

Conquering Fears of Giving Feedback by Karen May of Google | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

It’s simply harder to give difficult feedback than positive feedback or no feedback.  ...It creates tension.  However...70% of the time, it's worth it...


This interview with Karen May, vice president for people development at Google, was conducted and condensed by Adam Bryant.


Excerpt:

    

If you’ve identified something that isn’t going well, then you’re likely to be asked, “How do I fix it?” If you don’t know the answer, you might not want to start the conversation. 


________________
    
People can do something with the feedback probably 70% of the time.

   

________________


As a coach, I was often in the position of giving people feedback they hadn’t heard before, after I interviewed a bunch of people they work with. It was always difficult for me, too.

    

....But I came to find that people are incredibly grateful. If I’m not doing well and I don’t know it or I don’t know why or I can’t put my finger on what’s not working and no one will tell me, I won’t be able to fix it.

   

...if you give me the information, the moment that the information is being transferred is painful, but then I have the opportunity to change it. I’ve come to realize that one of the most valuable things I could do for somebody is tell them exactly what nobody else had told them before.

     

Q. How often does that have a positive outcome?

    

A. People can do something with the feedback probably 70 percent of the time. And for the other 30 percent, they are either not willing to take it in, it doesn’t fit their self-image, they’re too resistant, in denial, or they don’t have the wherewithal to change it.

...the reality is that most change happens in small increments. So if you’re watching to see if someone’s changing, you have to watch for the incremental change. It’s not a straight line


Related posts by Deb:
     

A History of Performance Appraisals: Letting Go to Power New Culture


Selecting a Coach: Connect, Clarify and Commit & 10 Questions to Ask Your Prospective Coach

      

The Pervasive Talent Myths Meet FLOW, Using Your Strengths

   

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is insightful from several perspectives:  that of helping people work through their blind spots, serving as a coach and NOT expecting to "fix it" as the key to the feedback.   There are alternative approaches to consider for feedback as well  (Escape from the Red Zone.)  

Ultimately, high performance and development requires an informed view of how to deal with feedback.   ~  Deb

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