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10 Ways to Change Performance Management Circa 2013 ~ Bacal

10 Ways to Change Performance Management Circa 2013 ~ Bacal | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Ten shifts that are necessary to modernize and update how we manage performance.


Excerpts:


1) Negotiating Goals and Objectives, Not Dictating


3) Individualizing Expectations Even For Employees Doing The Same Job

Each person ....bring their unique strengths to the job. So, people in the same position often do quite different things, and should be ...recognized for their unique contributions.


4) Managers Understand Employee Engagement Can Be Fostered Through Proper Management of Performance

Performance management is THE tool to help establish meaning of work, because it helps employees understand how their jobs fit into the whole.


Managers need to understand, also, that the reliance on rating forms for evaluation is a waste, and tends to squash employee engagement.


8) Recognize Employee Performance Is Not Always Under Their Control and Focus On The System

...much ...of what employees do is dictated and influenced by the environments they work in. ....discuss ALL barriers to employee performance, ...and move to remove those barriers.


9 ) Human Resource Departments Need To Enable Managers, Not Insist On Conformity

Human Resources (HR) needs to enable managers by providing them with a variety of tools, rather than dictate a one-size-fits-all system that is imposed upon managers and staff.


- See more at: http://performance-appraisals.org/Bacalsappraisalarticles/articles/tenways.htm#sthash.NdhA5cod.dpuf


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I've been following Robert Bacal for more than a decade.  For those ready to begin to take initial steps to let go of outdated performance practices that have low ROI, this is a helpful site and guide.  

He is also of the ilk of behaviorists including Aubrey Daniels.

For those who want to make the big leap, Robert Bacal's approach would be more incremental change, not transformational.    For those perspectives, stay tuned.  


~  Deb

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Board Members and the Trouble With Stock Compensation & Social Responsibility

Board Members and the Trouble With Stock Compensation & Social Responsibility | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

"Could board pay be contributing to corporate actions that brought about BP’s Gulf of Mexico oil spill and the 2008 financial crisis?"


Paying outside board members with equity grants is becoming increasingly popular. Unfortunately, new research suggests that it leads to companies with less socially responsible behavior. This investigation comes at a time of public outcry over business actions that have had a negative impact on societal and environmental interests, including BP’s oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010 and the 2008 financial crisis.


_____________________
 
"...director stock compensation in a given year exhibited higher financial performance in later years [and] lower levels of responsibility to communities"...

_____________________

   

Research into social performance ratings and director compensation data for more than 1,100 U.S. public companies between 1998 and 2006 showed that while companies with high levels of outside director stock compensation in a given year exhibited higher financial performance in later years, “they also showed lower levels of responsibility to communities as measured by their charitable giving, relations with indigenous peoples, community employment and economic development, and support for basic public services,” write Yuval Deutsch and Mike Valente (both of Schulich School of Business, York University). 

  
A similar effect was evident with environmental performance and with human rights measures.

   

The findings suggest that paying outside directors with stock incentivizes them to ignore other stakeholders.


Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Problems with compensation create a whole range of unintended consequences, even disasters.  This view of executive and board leadership pay is worth a look from an ethical, values based perspective as well as a monetary one.  ~  Deb

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Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's curator insight, August 13, 2013 6:30 PM

Does paying outside board members with equity grants lead to less socially responsible behavior?

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Ditching performance reviews for annual conversations that really work

Ditching performance reviews for annual conversations that really work | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Reimagining performance in organizations results in astounding leaps in focus, growth and productivity.  "There are alternatives, and it might be easier than you think."  This scoop summarizes how it works, from HopeLab. 

   

Excerpted:

     
"Like Adobe, we have also dismantled the traditional performance review and replaced it with ...the Annual Conversation... It's intended to inspire ...generative conversation about performance ...at a deeper level than might occur in regular supervision meetings throughout the year, " says Chris Marcell Murchison, Vice President Staff Development & Culture at HopeLab

 

________________
   
As a result, some staff, including managers, make astounding leaps in focus, growth and productivity.”

________________
   
   
  

Results   “Our staff look forward to their Annual Conversations and the impact on our culture has been profound. Employees report that they feel seen, heard, appreciated, and supported. As a result, some staff, including managers, make astounding leaps in focus, growth and productivity.”

    

How it works:

   

Questions We've created questions to help guide Annual Conversations. …We crowdsource questions from the entire organization and employees can add any questions they like to the basic list.


Examples include, 

"What are you working on when you feel the most purposeful? 

Why is this activity meaningful to you?" 

"What would you attempt to do in the next year if you knew you could not fail? 

    

Location Employees choose a location for the meeting.

    

Time …Typically most last anywhere from two to four hours.  …The manager and employee to decide what works best for them.

    

Non-evaluation The Annual Conversation is not an evaluation of past performance; it's a chance to reflect [and] understand… what's working and what's not, with an eye to setting future goals and enhancing growth and performance. There are no lgrades or performance rankings of any sort.

    

Merit …The Annual Conversation is not coupled to merit or incentive pay. These decisions are made separately and communicated outside the framework of the Annual Conversation.

    

Manager. There is nothing for her to prepare. [Her role is to] focus her attention on her direct report, listen, and ask questions to help deepen reflection.  

As for all Scoops, click on the photo or title to see the full article.

Related change & performance posts by Deb:

            

      

    

    
  • Curing ONE of the Seven Deadly Diseases of Management, Performance Appraisals

             

  • Stay in touch with the monthly Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  9 multi-gold award winning curation streams.  Preview it here, via REVELN Tools.

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I'm hopeful in 2015 that more organizations will be able to make the commitment to a multiyear process of letting go of industrial age (inspection oriented, 20th century) performance practices to give practices like the Annual Conversation a try.  It's possible to jump even further away from a manager, individual employee model.  Find out more here.   ~  Deb

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Ditching the Performance Appraisal in Favor of Performance Conversations

Ditching the Performance Appraisal in Favor of Performance Conversations | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Just 2 percent of human resources professionals reported in a recent Society for Human Resource Management survey that their organizations deserve an A grade in performance management, while 53 percent reported their organizations deserved between a C+ and a B. Twenty-one percent gave their organizations a C.

     

___________________
   
....More and more companies, including...Adobe...and Microsoft Corp., have opted recently to ditch the traditional performance review process for ...ongoing performance conversations.

___________________
      
The survey included nearly 400 randomly selected HR professionals in the United States who are SHRM members.

When asked about the challenges keeping their firms from getting a high performance management grade, HR professionals cited:

  • lack of managerial time,
  • insufficient training,
  • higher business priorities,
  • inconsistent evaluation standards and
  • lack of training.


....More and more companies, including technology firms Adobe Systems Inc. and Microsoft Corp., have opted recently to ditch the traditional performance review process for more frequent, ongoing performance conversations.


Related posts by Deb, including my mention of Adobe's work:

     

            

              

  • Stay in touch with the monthly Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  multi-gold award winning curation streams.  Preview it here,via REVELN Tools.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The bulleted list in this article is the reason that performance management will continue to be a losing proposition.  Instead, switch the focus to performance conversations.  It puts the emphasis where it belongs, less on inspection, more to acknowledgement of what works and support for the work within the system.  ~  D

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Letting Go: 6 Steps Beyond Industrial Age Performance Appraisals

Letting Go:  6 Steps Beyond Industrial Age Performance Appraisals | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

"It takes courage, tenacity and teamwork to let go of performance appraisal practices and industrial age thinking.  In our  post 9-11, post financial meltdown, "New Normal,"  business will never be as it was.  Can we let go?"


A1998 article about ending appraisals in favor of the APOP, the Annual Piece of Paper is one way to go.   Using an approach like the APOP or a two box annual conversation method, Meets [or Exceeds], Does not Meet, as mentioned in the video, is a step in the right direction. It is a form of incremental change, very similar to the Adobe Systems “check-ins” featured here in more detail.  Adobe’s 2012 system moved away from individualized ranking and ratings.  


The full post includes a short video that features asking a "beautiful question:      


Why are we doing things the way we’ve been doing them the past 20 years—what if we tried a whole new approach?      Thank you Warren Berger, author of “A Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas (2014)


It also covers why using Pass / Fail evaluation systems can help.


See the video and full post here.


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is my own video and post about performance review systems or appraisals.

The video embodies the D X V X F > R, change model, originally invented by Gleicher and popularized by Kathie Dannemiller.   The video covers assessing readiness, Dissatisfaction, the need to explain why make a change, the Vision, and First Steps to overcome Resistance to Change - along with our our Industrial Age / command and control, Theory X (McGregor) mindsets.  


A new path is emerging, but it is a slow path in business.  ~  Deb 

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, August 19, 2014 12:59 PM

This is my own video and post about performance review systems or appraisals.  It  is embedded within change principles, which is why I've posted it here as well as in the Talent & Performance Development curation news.    The video embodies the D X V X F > R, change model, originally invented by Gleicher and popularized by Kathie Dannemiller.   The video covers assessing readiness, Dissatisfaction, the need to explain why make a change, the Vision, and First Steps to overcome Resistance to Change - along with our our Industrial Age / command and control, Theory X (McGregor) mindsets.  

A new path is emerging, but it is a slow path in business.  ~  Deb 

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Entrepreneurship and 3 Factors to Survive in the Post-Job Economy

Entrepreneurship and 3 Factors to Survive in the Post-Job Economy | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

"A knowledge era is a fine thing, it sounds great … for a minority of people. So how do we (re)find a balance between jobs and people having them?""  How do people adapt to a post-job society?  


One of my clients is an educational institution and I was heartened to learn that they are moving away from job preparation to a focus on entrepreneurship. They see the numbers. Their graduates are not getting jobs. Creating our own work will be the only option for many of us.


Ross Dawson provides some good advice on what we can do to prepare for a post-job economy.


As I often say, in a connected world, unless your skills are world-class, you are a commodity.   However there are three domains in which individuals and organizations can transcend commoditization and push their value creation to the other end of the spectrum, where they can command their price and choose their work.


The three domains are:

    • EXPERTISE
    • RELATIONSHIPS
    • INNOVATION 



As always in our ScoopIt news, click on the photo, video or title to see the full Scooped post.

    

Recent and related posts by Deb:

      

      

       

    

       

  • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.  
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The post-job economy is hitting the unemployed and the millennial generation hard.  There will be reinvention, but how?  This is one of a number of posts I'll be scooping this year with the tag "post-job" and "post job economy" to explore this concept in depth in 2014.   ~  D

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Adobe’s New Approach to Abolishing the Yearly Performance Appraisal: The Details

Adobe’s New Approach to Abolishing the Yearly Performance Appraisal: The Details | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Adobe is blazing a trail.  Rosemary Arriada-Keiper, Head of Rewards at Adobe reviews several of the compensation details of their new program.


1)  Has Adobe completely done away with performance appraisals (evaluating past performance)?

Rosemary: Yes, we no longer have performance appraisals.  While we still believe we need to evaluate performance, we believe this should be done on an on-going basis through regular feedback provided during “check-ins”.  These are on-going discussions between employees and managers about goals, status against them, what is working, what is not, whether goals need to be modified or reprioritized given the environment, etc.   ...These “check-ins” are not written. ...We encourage at a minimum that "check-ins" happen quarterly but we typically see monthly in practice.


2) Has Adobe completely stopped giving performance ratings?
 

Rosemary:  Correct, we no longer provide a rating.  ... because of  “check-ins” both managers and employees should have a very good sense of performance by the time managers need to make compensation recommendations.

4)   You mention there are rewards for key talent.  How are key/high performers selected...? 


Rosemary:  We have a separate process for that whereby discussions about key talent happen with leadership in the respective organizations.  We do identify who they are and they are “tagged” in the system as Key Talent (yes/no) but no rating per se. 

Key talent receives stock although occasionally they get cash.  Both managers and individual contributors are eligible.  The total pool is no more than 2% of the employee population.
 

5)  What has been the response from both managers and employees about this change in program?

 

Rosemary: Very positive. There’s lots of relief around not having to write annual performance reviews and label employees a certain way.  That said, the conversations managers have with their employee has had to shift from “these are the guidelines given to me by HR [to} push[ing}  managers to own their decisions and be able to articulate them (and defend if challenged). 


Related tools & posts by Deb:

      

  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streamsfrom @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here, via REVELN Tools.

         

              


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Adobe made a huge jump away from their reviled stack ranking system, a move that even raised their stock prices.  

These are four (4) highlights from a longer article by Compensation Café shows how the revamped review, now called "check-in" without documentation, and the compensation system is now handled at Adobe.   Gone are the rankings, the yearly appraisal and ratings.

According to the head of "Rewards" at Adobe, it's been received quite positively.   It's certainly a step in the right direction.  It isn't really all that new.  The APOP or "Annual Piece of Paper" process described by an article in Fast Company in 1998 is very similar.  Here's the link.   I'll have more to say about it in my next blog post on REVELN.com.

~  Deb

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18 Things Highly Creative People Do Differently

18 Things Highly Creative People Do Differently | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Creativity works in mysterious and often paradoxical ways. 
      

Neuroscience paints a complicated picture of creativity, far more complex than the right-left brain distinction would have us think (the theory being that left brain = rational and analytical, right brain = creative and emotional).

     

....psychologically, creative personality types are ... complex, paradoxical and tend to avoid habit or routine. ...not just a stereotype of the "tortured artist" -- artists really may be more complicated people.

    

Scott Barry Kaufman, a psychologist at New York University who has spent years researching creativity, [said], "Imaginative people have messier minds."

   

Excerpts from the full list of 18:
     
They daydream.   Creative types know that daydreaming is anything but a waste of time.   ...mind-wandering can aid in the process of "creative incubation." ...from experience [we know] that our best ideas come seemingly out of the blue when our minds are elsewhere.

    

They observe everything.

Henry James is widely quoted, a writer is someone on whom "nothing is lost."
    
They take time for solitude."In order to be open to creativity, one must have the capacity for constructive use of solitude. One must overcome the fear of being alone," wrote the American existential psychologist Rollo May. 

     

They turn life's obstacles around.  Specifically, researchers have found that trauma can help people to grow in the areas of interpersonal relationships, spirituality, appreciation of life, personal strength, and -- most importantly for creativity -- seeing new possibilities in life.

     


They take risks.


.... "Creativity is the act of making something from nothing. It requires making public those bets first placed by imagination. This is not a job for the timid. Time wasted, reputation tarnished, money not well spent -- these are all by-products of creativity gone awry."


    


They make time for mindfulness.


Creative types understand the value of a clear and focused mind -- because their work depends on it. Many artists, entrepreneurs, writers and other creative workers, such as David Lynch,  have turned to meditation as a tool for tapping into their most creative state of mind.


Related tools & posts by Deb:

      

  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here, via REVELN Tools.
          
       

         


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

It's helpful to see this 2014 version of what distinguishes creatives, updated with mindfulness practice, yet listing daydreaming in the first, #1 spot.  The article offers a quote from the writer Joan Didion's notebook , "We are talking about something private, about bits of the mind’s string too short to use, an indiscriminate and erratic assemblage with meaning only for its marker."  ~  D

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Robin Martin's curator insight, March 6, 2014 10:14 PM

Thanks for sharing this, Deb! Loved it!

Christi Krug's curator insight, May 6, 2014 11:11 AM

I can relate to this! "Imaginative people have messier minds."

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Classic, Systemic Performance Insight > Better: A Surgeon's Notes on Performance

Classic, Systemic Performance Insight > Better: A Surgeon's Notes on Performance | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Why the best doctors are so good, and how the rest can learn to improve.  These are useful, classic lessons for all of us in better understanding performance, both individual and systemic.


Excerpts:


Gawande divides the essays into three sections — “Diligence,” “Doing Right” and “Ingenuity” — based on the components “for success in medicine or in any endeavor that involves risk and responsibility.”

Each essay focuses on a problem — the importance of hand-washing, health care delivery in India, the role of physicians in executions — that Gawande uses to anchor wide-ranging reflections.

...Gawande shows us that hand-washing turns out to be a profoundly complex and... that the moral obligations of physicians to death-row patients are not as clear as life and death, and that providing care to the poorest in the world takes a degree of ingenuity that should be categorized not simply as “better” but as downright heroic.


Related tools & posts by Deb:

      

  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here, via REVELN Tools.

         

              

      
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I highly recommend this well written collection of insightful performance stories.   

Gawande demonstrates how focusing on patients, performance and the big picture, the system, leads to improvement for people and the profession.    So much change fails, as he illustrates, without systemic intervention and peer-to-peer learning and engagement.

He uses history, story, numbers and his own experience to provide compelling insights useful to understanding systems thinking in performance.  

His early examples and accounts of of controlling infection in hospitals provides an excellent view of how difficult it is to make changes in systems, and that it also is possible, and heroic to affect change with the right approach as well as dogged determination. ~ D

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, February 20, 2014 2:19 PM

The book isn't new, but its insights into improving performance is compelling in using case examples for how challenging it is to help  change take hold in complex, resistant to systems - even when the intent to change is strong. ~ D

Richard Platt's curator insight, February 25, 2014 9:39 AM

This is also an excellent example of how to understand and create Use Cases.  


The original curator of this scoop, Deb from Revelyn Highly recommended this collection of insightful performance stories.  

Gawande demonstrates how focusing on patients, performance and the big picture, the system, leads to improvement for people and the profession.  

He uses history, story, numbers and his own experience to provide compelling insights useful to understanding systems thinking in performance.  His early examples and accounts of of controlling infection in hospitals provides an excellent view of how difficult it is to make changes in systems, and that it also is possible, and heroic to affect change with the right approach as well as dogged determination.

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Championing Limited Metrics and Low Power Culture: Results, High Profits

Championing Limited Metrics and Low Power Culture:  Results, High Profits | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Svenska Handelsbanken has championed an entirely different way of doing business, and has the profits, loyalty and longevity to prove that it works.

Three years ago, stock market analysts at Sweden’s main business paper set about using data from the London School of Business to find the world’s best performing share since the start of the 20th century.

The answer? Handelsbanken. Ten pounds invested in the Swedish bank in 1900 would have been worth about £20m by 2009, a rise of 1.9m pc. General Electric could manage only an 843,000pc rise.
 

And if you think the fruits of this astonishing return were limited to an elite club at the bank, you would be wrong.

Handelsbanken has an almost religious devotion to Oktogonen, its profit-sharing scheme. ...Every employee receives an equal share of the bank’s profits as long as it makes a return on equity greater than the average of its peer group.

   

__________________
   
..branches ....scrutinise [head office] costs. If they are not happy...they make sure the head office ups their game...

     
__________________

      

The money is then used to buy Handelsbanken shares for each staff member but these can be accessed only when employees reach the age of 60. This ultra-equitable approach means the bank teller whose career is spent cashing cheques will receive the same payout from Handelsbanken on retirement as its chief executive.


Afew other differences:


- It does not pay bonuses, with the exception of a small number of staff in its investment banking arm;
 

- It has no financial plans;
 

- The bank sets no sales targets for staff;
 

- It does not set out long-term goals and has no central marketing budget;
 

- Even its largest corporate customers must still bank with it at a branch level, and it has no credit scoring system.
 

...Anders Bouvin, UK chief executive explains....branches decide the costs of the head office. They scrutinise our costs. If they are not happy with the service, they make sure the head office ups their game...[or]...go elsewhere. The branch manager is the king of the bank,” he says.


Read the full post here.   Read more about the unusual 28 year career of Anders Bouvin, here.

   

Related tools & posts by Deb:

    

  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here, via REVELN Tools.
     
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Sometimes numbers can be a trap.   This is one of two posts featuring this unique, profitable bank that has outperformed MANY competitors.  ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, February 18, 2014 7:46 PM

This is a companion article, featuring the graphic shared by Niels Pflaeging on LinkedIn who mentions that  ...."companies like Handelsbanken have ....value creation and informal structures [that] are far more well-curated and developed than in command-and-control organizations."

~  Deb 

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Multitasking Makes Managers Less Thoughtful and Students - Multi-media Messes

Multitasking Makes Managers Less Thoughtful and Students - Multi-media Messes | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Chronic multitaskers have a harder time with everything.

Research on electronic devices at meetings from Stanford from Clifford Nass's Communication Between Humans and Interactive Media Lab clearly indicate that those who engage in media multitasking are unable to ignore irrelevant information and have difficulty identifying which information is important.


Even watching that stream of type crawl across your television screen during the evening news makes you less likely to retain information from either the program or the crawl. 


Source:  Harvard Business Review 


From another source, The Week:

In a recent TED Talk, Nass explains how college students "triple and quadruple-book media." He says, "When they're writing a paper, they're also listening to music, using Facebook, watching YouTube, texting etc."
     

To see what impact this has on their brains, Nass tasked 262 college students with completing three experiments that examined different aspects of multitasking: Switching quickly from one task to another, filtering out irrelevant information, and using what is called "working memory," an aspect of short-term memory that allows you to hold multiple pieces of information in your mind.
     

The results? Chronic multitaskers have a harder time with everything: Telling what information is relevant, managing working memory, and ignoring irrelevant information. 

         

Source:   Theweek.com/article/index/250739/chronic-multitasking-makes-us-worse-at-everything

Related posts & tools by Deb:


            

         

 


Photo by EraPhernalia Vintage Flickr 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Multitasking is increasingly being shown, in research, to be ineffective and inefficient.  It's time to remove it as a boilerplate addition to job descriptions.  It dates the  job description and the organization using it.  ~  D

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, January 31, 2014 11:09 PM

It's time to remove "must be able to multi-task" from 2014 job descriptions.

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Our Dangerous Obsession with "Vanity Metrics" and External Recognition

Our Dangerous Obsession with "Vanity Metrics" and External Recognition | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Our LinkedIn connections, speaking engagements, and press profiles should be seen as rewards for the value we create, not the actual process by which value is created.


If you’re too focused on these “vanity metrics,” you risk painting an all-too optimistic picture of yourself without accurately identifying, measuring, and improving the underlying drivers of your performance.

    

___________________________

     

 “Strive not be a success, but rather to be of value.” ~ Albert Einstein

    

___________________________


...Instead of measuring your progress using the yardstick of external recognition, focus on achieving your vision first, and you’ll be more visible than you can imagine.


...people who tap into their deep intrinsic motivations are much more (PDF) likely to succeed on long-term projects and hit loftier goals than those who are powered by the praise of others.

Related posts & tools by Deb:



Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This article lends perspective to overdoing the visibility factor in social media and in professional networks & in using speaking gigs.  What do you actually contribute via Vision and Desired Outcomes, to make a difference?  ~ D

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Richard Platt's curator insight, December 12, 2013 6:39 PM

Interesting article, and much of what it states is true however we are not so sure that it's going to change a lot of people's behavior though.  We have always beleived that character counted more than being a character, but its good to be both though....;-)

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Stretch Goals, Pay for Performance Boondoggles: Why Goal Setting Doesn't Work

Stretch Goals, Pay for Performance Boondoggles:  Why Goal Setting Doesn't Work | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

"Goal setting doesn't work."  There are times it can be helpful, but as a performance tool, reconsider.


Goal behavior:

  • 34% of Americans are overweight and a further 34% are obese.... Despite the proliferation of weight loss programs that usually focus on weight-loss goals. ...the problem may be inherent in the validity of goal setting.

  • Recent neuroscience research shows the brain works in a protective way, resistant to change. Therefore, any goals that require substantial behavioral change or thinking-pattern change will automatically be resisted. ...When fear of failure creeps into the mind of the goal setter it commences a de-motivator with a desire to return to known, comfortable behavior and thought patterns."
     
  • Aubrey Daniels, author of, Oops! 13 Management Practices That Waste Time and Money, ...cites a study that shows when individuals repeatedly fail to reach stretch goals their performance declines. Another study showed 10% of employees actually achieved stretch goals. 
     

The authors of Goals Gone Wild, [identify] negative side effects associated with goal setting: "An overly narrow focus that neglects non-goal areas; a rise in unethical behavior; distorted risk preferences; corrosion of organizational culture; and reduced intrinsic motivation."


Related posts & tools by Deb:



Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Well, if "distorted risk preferences; corrosion of organizational culture; and reduced intrinsic motivation" isn't enough to question goal-setting practices of yore, then perhaps the status quo is a bit too comfortable to challege this performance myth.  


~  Deb

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Talent Development: Do We Need HR Departments?

Talent Development:  Do We Need HR Departments? | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

If HR doesn’t deliver some unique benefits then outsourcing it makes a lot of business sense.


Other companies, however, have invested in the ‘people function’. They realize that they need people who ensure that the company finds, recruits, retains and develops its people. 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The author's provocative article has stimulated 1000+ comments in just a few days.  How HR is viewed is also a reflection or microcosm of the clarity and integrated condition of the company's mission, vision, performance approach and culture of valuing (or not valuing) people.

From the commentary on this piece, 'before we talk about all the strategic HR staff, no one will listen or care unless you pay them right."   I find this to be true in my own work with performance management over the years.

Good structure, fair compensation, and HR not overstepping its bounds providing performance management "advice" is important.  


~ Deb

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Major Trends Altering the Workplace Landscape

Major Trends Altering the Workplace Landscape | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Where will work be in the future? And where will workers be? The economic, social, and technological landscape is shifting rapidly. Here are some of the major trends altering the future workplace.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Read Mikkelsen's summary by clicking on the red "Reactions" below.  There's a lot there.   A good deal of it reminds me of 20th century industrial age corporatism.

An alternative is this: 


Change in the Nature of Work: The Case For "Antiwork" and the 20 hour Work Week 


 for these reasons:    

"...we see the persistent belief that we can achieve 'full employment.' Rifkin showed empirically that this is nonsense, unless we create a lot of make-work, i.e., work for the sake of working. And that’s what, as a society, we seem to be doing. Everywhere you look there are stupid, pointless (and probably environmentally destructive) jobs."

~  Deb

 

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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, February 11, 5:39 PM

Among the many broad trends affecting the future workplace and workers are:


  • More workplace flexibility will be demanded by new highly skilled workers, but most workers will also accept the need to work longer total hours.
  • The “workplace” for any given job is likely to continue to spread over multiple time zones or continents, with workers connecting through a growing range of media channels.
  • There will be a greater premium placed on knowledge workers who ask constructive questions concerning an employer’s mission, as well as their customers, market values, desired results, and evolving marketing and business plans.
  • Workers and managers will focus more on simplifying workloads versus just getting it all done, which reduces the risk of missing critical innovation opportunities.
  • Managers will promote health and wellness programs that focus on helping workers quit smoking, lose weight, or deal with depression, because healthy employees are more productive and miss fewer days because of poor health.
  • Employers will embrace less-expensive employee recruiting through social networks (this reached 94% of employers this last year, reports Jobvite.com). And hirers are relying more on critical thinking skills tests like the Collegiate Learning Assessment, rather than on just college grades and degrees to assess candidates.
  • More than 75% of U.S. employees are almost continuously looking for work while employed, and they hold nearly a dozen different jobs on average before age 35.
  • Employers are using personal reputation (strong track records) to make hiring decisions and 75% of jobseekers are using company “brand” in the same way, even accepting a lower salary to work with a desired firm.
  • Approximately one-third of Americans in the workforce (17 million workers) are freelance contractors and consultants. This means more people working from home without employer-sponsored health-care benefits.
  • And 30% of U.S. workers are on flextime when working from home (or other locations) two to three days a week. As well, some studies have found increased productivity of as much as 15%–20% for these flextime workers.
Nedko Aldev's curator insight, February 14, 1:04 PM

add your insight...

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The Biggest Career Killer of All Time: The Performance Review

The Biggest Career Killer of All Time: The Performance Review | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

[Here it goes:  Jenny's}  annual performance review.


Do you know where this was happening?


At Starbucks.


Her manager is giving her the results of her year-end performance in a public coffee shop. I know, because I was sitting at the table next to them as an innocent bystander.


What do you think Jenny is thinking right now while her manager is telling her this?


“Adobe ended performance reviews in 2012, after the employer noticed greater employee turnover after the annual reviews. [Their HR exec. said]...the reviews were an outdated process and made people feel like they were labeled.”


Schedule regular check-ins. I go out of my way to get feedback from my manager every two weeks. I put this on my client manager’s calendar as a recurring event.


Related posts by Deb:

    

     

     

    


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

There's more in the article about getting on your manager's schedule, asking questions.  I think you can go even farther than that, beyond "check-ins" - to act systemically.  Yet it is a significant step in the right direction toward ending what W. Edwards Deming called one of the "7 deadly diseases affecting management."  I've written about how to end, and begin anew.  Is it time for your organization?   Perhaps it's time to have a conversation.  If you'd like, you can contact me here for ways to begin.   ~  Deb

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Choice about Performance Feedback is Powerful! A 2014 Top Product Winner: Skillrater.com

Choice about Performance Feedback is Powerful! A 2014 Top Product Winner: Skillrater.com | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

     

What It Is:   Skillrater.com is a cloud-based performance-feedback tool that incorporates social networking and collaboration. It is designed to encourage employees, leaders, teams and organizations to collaborate and help each other improve over time. After completing any work activity, an employee can request a rating from a supervisor, peer, client or customer.   ….Skillrater's feedback is provided in the form of one-to-five ratings on day-to-day activities. 

    

__________________________

      

Employees are empowered to take control of their own development and advancement...so their good work gets noticed. 

   

__________________________

    

         

[Technology]:  Skillrater can also plug in to complement any integrated talent-management suite, such as Oracle Talent Cloud or SuccessFactors, or can be used as a stand-alone solution. It can also be used to help determine a return-on-investment in leadership-development programs and tracking talent data for various HR developmental and organizational initiatives.
     

Why We Like It: ...the ability to import LinkedIn profiles into the system were...highly valued by our team of judges... [W]e also liked that Skillrater enables employees to request feedback on their own work.

      

Employees are empowered to take control of their own development and advancement, and your most ambitious employees will want to request ratings often so their good work gets noticed. 

     

......we especially like how the product easily enables raters to include a positive, reinforcing message into a rating before delivering a critique. 

As always in REVELN ScoopIt news, click on the photo to see the full post.


Related posts by Deb:

     

            

              

      

        

                  

    • Stay in touch with the monthly Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  9 multi-gold award winning curation streams.  Preview it here, via REVELN Tools.


    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    This tool can be used to shift the conversation about performance to ***conversation*** about performance, rather than inspection, monitoring, and all that industrial age stuff that continues to plague performance management systems.

    I talked with Louis Carter today about Skillrater, and learned I was one of the first to comment on this new technology last year.   As of this posting, I'm interested in testing this product in an organization ready to update to more modern, less inspection-oriented performance support, focused on appreciation and encouragement, using ratios such as 5 to 1, positive to critique [disclosure.] 
       
    The 5 to 1 feedback ratio is based on research from the Positive Organizational Scholarship folks including the Univ. of Michigan Ross Business School.  A video describing how Skillrater works is here.   Lou's press release about Skillrater winning the 2014 award is here.
           
    If you'd like to have a conversation about trying out SkillRater with the perspective of a seasoned, Whole System Transformation (WST) and organization development consultant/coach like me, contact me here.  Thanks!   ~  Deb Nystrom, REVELN.com

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    The Sharing Economy = Freedom, Uncertainty and Risk. Good Gigs, or ‘Wage Slavery’?

    The Sharing Economy = Freedom, Uncertainty and Risk.  Good Gigs, or ‘Wage Slavery’? | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

    "Workers are their own bosses in the so-called sharing economy, but that flexibility also brings much uncertainty — and few of the protections of full-time work."
        

    Jennifer Guidry, 35, [uses] her own car to ferry around strangers for Uber, Lyft and Sidecar, ride services that let people summon drivers on demand via apps. She also assembles furniture and tends gardens for clients who find her on TaskRabbit, an online marketplace for chores.

        

    Her goal is to earn at least $25 an hour, on average. Raising three children with her longtime partner, Jeffrey Bradbury, she depends on the income to help cover her family’s food and rent. 

        

    “You don’t know day to day,” she said. “It’s very up in the air.”

         

    The sharing economy, whose sites and apps connect people seeking services with sellers of those services, Ms. Guidry is a microentrepreneur, an independent contractor who earns money by providing her skills, time or property to consumers in search of a lift, a room to sleep in, a dry-cleaning pickup, a chef, an organizer of closets.

        

    For those seeking a sideline, these services can provide extra income. …businesses like Airbnb, the short-term-stay broker; task brokers like TaskRabbit and Fiverr; on-demand delivery services like Postmates and Favor; and grocery-shopping services like Instacart.

         

    Six years ago, she had a full-time job as the controller at a small company. After she gave birth to her youngest son, her office asked her to work extended hours. She couldn’t both accommodate the company and take care of her newborn. So she ended up leaving her job.

       

    ...[With] continuing high unemployment, however, people like Ms. Guidry are less microentrepreneurs than microearners. They often work seven-day weeks, trying to assemble a living wage from a series of one-off gigs. …To reduce the risks, many workers toggle among multiple services.


    ....“If you did the calculations, many of these people would be earning less than minimum wage,” says Dean Baker, an economist who is the co-director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research in Washington. “You are getting people to self-exploit in ways we have regulations in place to prevent.”
       


    ====


    As always in our ScoopIt news, click on the photo, video or title to see the full Scooped post.

           

    Related tools & posts by Deb:

                   

          

           

    • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.  

     

    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    What will it take to make the adjustments needed to provide good wages and employment to most?  The market may not be kind to those on their own without the needed unique/hard to find talent.  I'll be following this topic using the tags "post-job" and "post job economy" as well as via related posts following the job experiences of millennials.  ~  D

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    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, August 17, 2014 10:52 PM

    What will it take to make the adjustments needed to provide good wages and employment to most?  The market may not be kind to those on their own without the needed unique/hard to find talent.  I'll be following this topic using the tags "post-job" and "post job economy" as well as via related posts following the job experiences of millennials.  ~  D

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    How Avery-Dennison Does Strengths Right, Building Strong, Versatile Leadership Teams

    How Avery-Dennison Does Strengths Right, Building Strong, Versatile Leadership Teams | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

    A global manufacturer and distributor uses its Leading to Win program to promote a team spirit through recognizing strengths and weaknesses, getting everyone’s best contribution to the team, boosting team connectivity and resilience. Participants are encouraged to discuss and reconsider team roles and group dynamics.

    ___________________
       
    The result is not just stronger and more versatile leaders, but also stronger and more versatile teams.

         

    ___________________

          

    The program uses divergent perspectives and underrepresented strengths that often get neglected. Further, it illuminates blind spots so the team can avoid going overboard with shared strengths. The result is not just stronger and more versatile leaders, but also stronger and more versatile teams.

        

    From an individual and team perspective:   managers frequently don’t understand their strengths and therefore are prone to underdo or overdo them. Through self-awareness and effort they can make better use of their strengths. The approach also identifies weaknesses they can’t afford to ignore for both managers and teams.

        

    Summary reports present aggregate data from both assessments that team members analyze together to identify trends and their implications.

        
    The program uses divergent perspectives and underrepresented strengths that often get neglected. Further, it illuminates blind spots so the team can avoid going overboard with shared strengths. The result is not just stronger and more versatile leaders, but also stronger and more versatile teams.


     

    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    This piece features a balanced view of using strengths and weaknesses tools, featuring 360 feedback, for large organizations that have the resources and maturity to do 360 right.  360 processes can be easily under-resourced, which only creates more problems than it solves. 
       
    The two assessment tools central to the success of the program are (from the article):

        

    Realise2, a self-assessment of 60 strengths gauged according to performance, usage and energy. Results are sorted into four categories: realized strengths, unrealized strengths, learned behaviors and weaknesses.

       

    The Leadership Versatility Index, is a 360 that provides feedback on how co-workers observe strengths, learned behaviors and weaknesses. The LVI’s “Goldilocks” rating scale ranges from “too little” to “the right amount” to “too much.”

    Source:  Chief Learning Officer's August 2014 feature, "Strength is Not Enough."

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    Develop your Talent, Sponsor a Workshop during International Coaching Week in May

    Develop your Talent, Sponsor a Workshop during International Coaching Week in May | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

    Experience timely, current workshop topics  during International Coaching Week ~  May 19-25, 2014  - sponsored by the International Coaching Federation (ICF).

    Coach Café Ann Arbor is offering to selected local leaders pro-bono workshops and coaching from some of the top coaches in the Ann Arbor and South East Michigan area (Flint and Detroit included.)
     

    Why? We want to create awareness of the return on investment of coaching, as well as offering to you new educational partnerships in a win-win opportunity.  


    ______________________
       
    We must always change, renew, rejuvenate ourselves; otherwise we harden.
    ~ Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe

    ______________________


    Here’s the business case for professional coaching.  Of all clients who have engaged a coach,

    • 99% report satisfaction with the coaching experience,
    • 70% report improved work performance,
    • 80% report increased self confidence,
    • 68% individuals report financial return on investment,
    • 80% companies report financial return on investment.



    For South East Michigan and Ann Arbor, check out our local website here featuring ICW sample workshops here.   See photos from last year here.

    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    This is a great win-win talent development opportunity for your leaders, staff and faculty.  Coach, consultant biographies are also listed on the website and on the ICF Michigan website, as well as the national site for the International Coaching Federation.

    Now is a good time to reach out to one of the coaches and plan some workshops and coaching demonstrations for this special May event.   ~  Deb

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    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, May 6, 2014 4:13 PM

    Add freshness to your company workshops experience and coaching by local, professionals.  Contact a coach listed on the main, local website here:  http://coachcafeannarbor.weebly.com/

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    Wirearchies = Adaptive, Two Way Flow of Power, Knowledge, with a Focus on Results

    Wirearchies = Adaptive, Two Way Flow of Power, Knowledge, with a Focus on Results | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

    Harold Jarche features Chee Chin Liew’s presentation on moving from hierarchies to teams at BASF.  It shows how IT Services used their technology platforms to enhance networking, knowledge-sharing, and collaboration.  


    It features an approach to “building flows of information into pertinent, useful and just-in-time knowledge” so that...  knowledge can flow in order to foster trust and credibility.

          

    ______________________________

        

    In complex environments, weak hierarchies and strong networks are the best organizing principle.   ...It means giving up control. 

       

    _______________________________
           
    Creating this two-way flow of dialogue, practice, expertise, and interest, can be the foundation of a 
    wirearchy.

    In complex environments, weak hierarchies and strong networks are the best organizing principle.


    ....many companies today have strong networks...coupled with strong central control. Becoming a wirearchy requires new organizational structures that incorporate communities, networks, and cooperative behaviours. It means giving up control. The job of those in leaderships roles is to help the network make better decisions. 



    Related tools & posts by Deb:


    See the companion post about Holacracy, here.

               

    • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here, via REVELN Tools.
            

              

          

     

    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    Harold Jarche highlights several useful models featuring two way information flow through power and authority. which helps build, if the culture allows it, adaptability into knowledge work.  


    As quoted in the article, much of this work has been "routinized and standardized with the ongoing marriages of business processes and integrated enterprise information systems."  This makes for a fragile system susceptible to disruption.  

    Building robust, two-way flows is essential to enable adaptability to the realities of continuous change and learning organizations ready to embrace disruption.  ~  D

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    Helen Teague's curator insight, March 6, 2014 1:46 PM

    well worth the reading time.

    InflatableCostumes's curator insight, March 7, 2014 7:26 AM

     Manufacturers of Custom Shaped Cold Air Inflatables including Giant Character shapes and  Product Replicas also Rooftop Balloons specializing in custom inflatables for advertising, manufactured in Hyderabad city, India - http://www.inflatablecostumes.com

    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, August 17, 2014 2:23 PM

    I just featured the called out quote above about complexity (over complicated, bureaucratic), and less hierarchy, more communication via networks in my most recent post about letting go of industrial age thinking via the command and control nature of performance appraisals.  

    Wirearchy and holacracy (think Zappos) are alternatives that embrace networked learning.  One is arguably a set of principles, the latter is an organization design approach that deemphasizes management.

    ~  Deb

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    What is your Clock for Change? Coaching with the iWam, Work Attitude & Motivation

    What is your Clock for Change?  Coaching with the iWam, Work Attitude & Motivation | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

    This excerpt features the assessment tool, the iWAM, which reveals ‘change’ patterns as motivational patterns and shows us what our ‘Clock’ for change looks like.  iWam = the Inventory for Work Attitude & Motivation

    The iWAM “Clock” answers the question ..."After how many years one needs a significant change to be motivated again?"

    Learning about a top-performer’s need for change allows us to plan for the time when burnout would set in so that we can prevent it and retain our top talent.


    The information from the Clock also helps us make better career decisions and work-life planning.


    From the iWam website:


    The iWam is based on a model of cognitive thinking styles (48 parameters are measured and explained). The iWAM Management Report identifies a person's motivational and attitude preferences in the job context and predicts how this person will behave in various job types, such as administrative, customer contact or managerial tasks.

    The 
    iWAM Attitude Sorter predicts key motivational preferences and development areas. The questionnaire can be administered over the Internet or as a pen-and-paper test. The iWAM is currently available in more than 15 languages. Test administration takes 25 to 45 minutes.


    Source: http://www.theiwam.com/the-clock


    Photo by deux-chi, Flickr


    Related tools & posts by Deb:

        

    • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here, via REVELN Tools.


    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    The iWam is a moderate to advanced assessment instrument that is useful for looking at work attitudes and motivation.  Samples of iWam reports are here


    ~ Deb

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    Social Business Tools Are Transforming the Way We Work & Give Feedback

    Social Business Tools Are Transforming the Way We Work & Give Feedback | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

    Social business, the use of social network platforms for workplace communication and collaboration, is new... ...Some businesses are harnessing the power of social platforms to facilitate workplace productivity.


    __________________
       
    Consider the transformation when co-workers replace one-to-one emails with group collaboration.
       

    __________________


    ... first entries include Yammer, Rypple, and NationalField in 2008. Saba released its first social networking solutions for HR in 2009, and Mango Apps, 7Geese, and Globoforce came along in 2010.


    Yammer, acquired by Microsoft, originally described itself as “Facebook for business.” Rypple, bought by Salesforce.com and rebranded as Work.com, gives companies an online motivational and coaching tool. Globoforce invites supervisors and peers to encourage each other with positive feedback, including digital badges and rewards.

         

    [These] tools of social business field are leading to a new level of organizational transparency.   ...Consider the transformation when co-workers replace one-to-one emails with group collaboration on a social platform. A worker in Charlotte asks a question, a colleague in London answers, a team member in Shanghai provides clarification, and many other employees are brought along for the ride. With social tools, employees pool their knowledge and get the work done.
          

    Social tools also act as new platforms for performance appraisals that are relevant and positive in real time. Work.com offers the option of anonymous feedback, which the company says is easier to give and receive. Saba’s Pulse funnels social feedback into a company’s formal review process. Adobe Systems, on the other hand, has done away with traditional performance reviews and has replaced it with its own new platform, Check-In, for informal real-time responses.

    As always in our ScoopIt news, click on the photo, video or title to see the full Scooped post.

        

    Related posts by Deb:

        

         

        

      

           

    • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.  


    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    Be careful what you ask for, you just might get it.  Those staffers who've asked for more transparency from their administrators, could find themselves out in the open, ready to shine or ready to run away once social collaboration fully meets the light of day.  

    I for one am very curious to learn of how Adobe Systems, using Check-in, may be making progress with reinventing performance review and dealing with the problems of individualistic feedback, as all of us work as part of a system, reference, W. Edward Deming's "Red Bead Experiment."  Stay tuned, it may be a bumpy ride, and it could be a transformation of better understanding human performance is in store.  ~  D 

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    Hire & Fire is Different at Holacracy®-Powered Companies

    Hire & Fire is Different at Holacracy®-Powered Companies | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it
    In a typical top-down management structure, the power to hire and fire employees is generally in the hands of managers.


    With the decentralization of authority, the separation of people and role, and the dynamic evolution of those roles, [its] more like free agents going about their work with no central planning.  This then begs the question: who can decide how and when to hire or fire?


    Holacracy doesn’t answer that question; it simply gives you a framework and processes for your company to figure it out. 


    Brian Robertson — designed a 3-Tier Partnership App to answer a different question: “How can we account for the difference between partners deeply committed to the organization, and those for whom the commitment is lesser and more temporary?”


    • It separates “partnership commitment” from financial compensation.
        
    • It defines three tiers of partners: Standard Partner, Tenured Partner, and Core Partner. Each tier requires a higher level of commitment to the organization, and in return offers a higher level of commitment from the organization.
         
    • It was designed for a relatively small organization.
        
       

    Related posts & tools by Deb:



                    
           

    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    Social media is an artifact of a new age, choice driven, commitment oriented.  Holacracy is at the cutting edge of how this looks in adaptive organizations that thrive on flatter, open structures.   It's an open question:  Will it scale?


    Comparing and contrasting holacracy used at a biggger company, Zappos, is on my companion Change Leadership Watch ScoopIt here entitled:


    Zappos is going Holacratic: No Job Titles, No Managers, No Hierarchy

    ~  Deb 

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    Never Say Never? Ratings & Frequency Scales for Performance Feedback

    Never Say Never?  Ratings & Frequency Scales for Performance Feedback | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

    Take a second look at the validity of ratings, especially frequency scales for Performance including multi-rater feedback.


    Excerpts:


    [There are] …challenges of creating reliable/valid measurement when …relying on input …from observers of his/her behavior….[specifically] the rating scale that is being used.  


    _______________________

        

    “Always”....doesn’t mean they do it well.   …conversely...Rarely or Never doesn’t mean they are bad at it.

        

    _______________________

         

    …the rating scale’s effectiveness is likely to be directly affected by the quality of rater training….often neglected beyond …basic …written instructions. 

         

    In [David Bracker's] webinar, [he] shared a list of a dozen or so various rating scales that I have encountered over the years, all in a 5 point format.  

         

    …The 3D Groups recent benchmark study of over 200 organizations that use 360 feedback that, by far, the 5 point scale and the Likert Agree/Disagree format are used more often than any other scale type.  

        

    …this practice is a form of laziness in 360 designers who haven’t reflected long or hard enough to consider scales that work better when the target is a specific person and not some nebulous entity like an organization [as with an] engagement survey.

        

    ….frequency scales (typically 5 point scales…ranging from Never to Always)…continue to be widely used…[and are] conceptually flawed. People can’t do everything “Always” (or even Almost Always…)  …because they do something “always” doesn’t mean they do it well.   …conversely, because they do it Rarely or Never doesn’t mean they are bad at it. 


    ______________________  

        

    Frequency scales are used far too frequently.  They should be used Never.

        

    ______________________

        


    ...frequency scales severely penalize supervisors who do some things infrequently but are otherwise perceived to be effective.

         

    …Research by Kaiser and Kaplan (2006) (that you can access here:http://kaplandevries.com/thought-leadership/list/C44)...demonstrate that frequency scales are, by far, less satisfactory when compared to Evaluative and “Do More/Do Less” scales.


    Frequency scales are used far too frequently.  They should be used Never.

    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    David Bracker's post helps clarify a number of issues with performance ratings.
     

    I’ve found in certain settings, a simple scale with description: Do more of, Stay the Same, Do Less of” with perhaps three to five items takes a group further, especially in “tender” groups, those who may have limited trust and openness. In such groups, making the “do less of” voluntary, helps to some degree, particularly if it is seen as an honest option, with no pressure to participate in “improvement” feedback.    ~  D

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    Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
    Scoop.it!

    The New HR Organization is a Talent Machine 2014

    The New HR Organization is a Talent Machine  2014 | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

    "HR 2014 Future Trend findings by Bersin of Deloitte Analyst based on interviews with organizations on the Future of HR."


    Excerpted:


    1. Talent Management Defines HR


    Microsoft's recently announced they've done away with forced ranking. ...HR's role was to spearhead this change - beyond the basics (payroll, employee relations, time and attendance, compliance.)  The basics are NOT enough to be competitive.


    2. Integrated Talent Management Has Shifted to Optimized Talent Management.   ... "Optimization" = how can they better compete to attract, retain, and engage their aging workforce?


    3. HR Business Partner Roles Have to Change Dramatically

    This item features a special performance consulting group...of five senior HR specialists (staffing, OD, learning, labor relations) working on special talent projects. They diagnosed a problem in one unit as a lack of employment brand in one of the areas they serve. They worked with the recruiting team to build a local, highly tuned employment branding program - with internships, local universities and new sourcing tools - to gain access to engineers. Within a few quarters the problem started to go away.


    Could a generalist have done this without a lot of help? Unlikely.


    4.  Business Thinking and Data Are Now Critical to Success

    ...build talent analytics and workforce planning capabilities so [HR] can prove that we're delivering impact.

    Photo: gilmorec Flickr cc


    Related posts by Deb:

    Choices for High Performance Teams, Groups and Psuedo-Teams: Achievement Is How You Say It

         

    Beyond Resilience: Givers, Takers, Matchers and Anti-Fragile Systems

    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    I'd define the 2014 term as Talent Development.  Traditional management techniques are changing too.  Many of the bigger companies, including Microsoft as cited in this article, have been slow to change.  Mid-size  and more agile large companies have long ago dropped forced rankings, for example.


    Mid-size and larger companies are also building in Business Intelligence, data access that is accessible by more than the traditional management / leadership elite.  This is also changing the nature of business.

    Bersin's views capture approaches already in place in leading companies, the exact point of this curation stream.  ~  Deb

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    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, December 11, 2013 4:08 PM

    I'd define the 2014 term as Talent Development.  Traditional management techniques are changing too.  Many of the bigger companies, including Microsoft as cited in this article, have been slow to change.  Mid-size  and more agile, adaptable large companies have dropped forced rankings long ago.


    Mid-size and larger companies are also building in Business Intelligence, data access that is accessible by more than the traditional management / leadership elite.  This is also changing the nature of business.

    Bersin's views capture approaches already in place in leading companies, the exact point of this curation stream.


    From Talent and Performance Development 

    http://www.scoop.it/t/talent-and-performance-development 

    news.   ~  D