Talent and Perfor...
Follow
Find
1.6K views | +0 today
 
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
onto Talent and Performance Development
Scoop.it!

SuccessFactors Reviews

SuccessFactors Reviews | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

SuccessFactors, an HR software firm has been purchased by software giant SAP in 2013.  Via the Glassdoor reviews, it doesn't seem the merger is going so well in 2013 internally, though externally, all seems fine.   This "things are fine" stste is being reported via bloggers attending Success Factors presentations at conference, with non-disclosure agreements in tow.
 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

In a companion ScoopIt, SAP has not "messed up" Success Factors  (an HR system automation company)...at least, not yet.  This series of employer reviews on Glassdoor by new and current SuccessFactors employees (now working for SAP) is a cause for pause.     


Not using your own products, like Success Factors for their own HR, would be one sign that the merger is more about selling and less about quality and alignment with company values, for which they do tout quite a few via company slogans about transparency and "don't leave our wounded behind."  

A sample of different 2013 current employee reviews includes:  

  • "Hypocrite culture," 
   
  • "The company has grown so fast," 
   
  • "This is a culture of lies, fear and manipulation," 


and,


  • "Telling workers to get out if they raise issues which they feel should be addressed is not rational."


                                                                                  - Deb



 

more...
No comment yet.
Talent and Performance Development
Making sense of performance and talent development systems to create & sustain high performance in organizations. For the BEST of the BEST curated news in performance, change, agile learning, innovation, motivation, social media and careers, SUBSCRIBE to Reveln.com/Tools/
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Amazon’s Social Rift: Ongoing Rank and Yank and Work / Life Non-Balance, NYT Video

Amazon’s Social Rift: Ongoing Rank and Yank and Work / Life Non-Balance, NYT Video | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it
The recent New York Times article about Amazon inspired an unprecedented online conversation about workplace stress.


This video features highlights of the thousands of comments posted on the web.


_____________________________
   
...[Amazon seeks]  to manage out a certain percentage of its work force annually. The number varies from year to year.


_____________________________



From another New York Time article dated August 17th, 2015, is error about Amazon's performance culture:


An article by Amazon engineer, Nick Ciubotariu, was circulated by Amazon’s public relations department after The Times article was published. Mr. Ciubotariu describes strengths of the workplace, including focus on customers and innovation. He also wrote that “no one” was encouraged to “toil long and late,” and dismissed the concerns expressed by many women at the company, which does not include any women on its top leadership team.

    

His points contradicted the accounts of many former and current colleagues, and some of his assertions were incorrect, including a statement that the company does not cull employees on an annual basis. An Amazon spokesman previously confirmed that the company sought to manage out a certain percentage of its work force annually. The number varies from year to year.

 


Related culture & performance posts by Deb:

      

   
   
   



Photo credit:  Soumit Nandi Flickr Creative Commons

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This brief 30 second video (click on the title or photo or link) is definitely worth a look on what a very large, 21st century profit and high growth minded company with a competitive culture looks like.  Amazon also features a traditional, 20th century, performance "rank and yank" evaluation system. It is more euphemistically called the Vitality Curve, or as stated above, managing out a certain percentage of its work force annually.  

Rank and yank can be a welcome temporary purge to a company that struggling.  Organizations that are stuck in the past, burdened with lower performance staff, or other low performance ills have had some success with the "Vitality Curve. Yet for the company to use it consistently, rather than temporarily speaks volumes on what is important and not important at Amazon.  ~ Deb

more...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, August 19, 1:08 PM

This brief 30 second video is definitely worth a look on what a very large, 21st century profit and high growth minded company with a competitive culture looks like.  Amazon also features a traditional, 20th century, performance "rank and yank" evaluation system. It is more euphemistically called the Vitality Curve, or as stated above, managing out a certain percentage of its work force annually.  

While "rank and yank" can be a welcome temporary purge to a company that is stuck, burdened with lower performance staff, and so forth, to use it consistently, rather than temporarily speaks volumes on what is important and not important at Amazon.  


Also posted in Talent and Performance Development.  ~ Deb

Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Amazon: Wrestling Big Ideas in a Bruising Workplace

Amazon: Wrestling Big Ideas in a Bruising Workplace | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Amazon may be singular ...[or] ...just been quicker in responding to changes that the rest of the work world is now experiencing: data that allows individual performance to be measured continuously, come-and-go relationships between employers and employees, and global competition in which empires rise and fall overnight. Amazon is in the vanguard of where technology wants to take the modern office: more nimble and more productive, but harsher and less forgiving.

... Keith Ketzle, a freckled Texan triathlete with an M.B.A., ...explain[s] how he left his old, lumbering company for a faster, grittier one.  “Conflict brings about innovation,” he said.

      

_____________________

   

To prod employees, Amazon has a powerful lever...Its perpetual flow of real-time, ultra-detailed metrics

_____________________


    
 ...the articles of faith ...describe the way Amazonians should act. In contrast to companies where declarations about their philosophy amount to vague platitudes, Amazon has rules that are part of its daily language and rituals, used in hiring, cited at meetings and quoted in food-truck lines at lunchtime. Some Amazonians say they teach them to their children.


...Employees are to exhibit “ownership” (No. 2), or mastery of every element of their businesses, and “dive deep,” (No. 12) or find the underlying ideas that can fix problems or identify new services before shoppers even ask for them.

    

Compensation is considered competitive — successful midlevel managers can collect the equivalent of an extra salary from grants of a stock that has increased more than tenfold since 2008. But workers are expected to embrace “frugality” (No. 9), from the bare-bones desks to the cellphones and travel expenses that they often pay themselves.  

   

To prod employees, Amazon has a powerful lever: more data than any retail operation in history. Its perpetual flow of real-time, ultradetailed metrics allows the company to measure nearly everything its customers do: what they put in their shopping carts, but do not buy; when readers reach the “abandon point” in a Kindle book; and what they will stream based on previous purchases. It can also tell when engineers are not building pages that load quickly enough, or when a vendor manager does not have enough gardening gloves in stock.
     

“Data creates a lot of clarity around decision-making,” said Sean Boyle, who runs the finance division of Amazon Web Services and was permitted by the company to speak. “Data is incredibly liberating.”


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Are "rank and yank" evaluation methods and ultra-detailed metrics the future of work, a la Amazon, or Frederick Taylor's 20th century scientific management methods on steroids?  Time will tell.  I hope that other companies with a different work ethic will prevail. ~  Deb

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Talent Wins: 4 Strategies to Ramp Up Retention

Talent Wins: 4 Strategies to Ramp Up Retention | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Successful organizations focus on people as well as profits, built with talented staff that take action as co-owners of the business. Twenty-first century talent retention practices can build greater success in your organization. Here’s are 4 ways leaders can help this happen:

    

1) Check your “hire smart” bench strength & compensation

Nothing breeds success like talented staff and the ability to pay them at the going market rate.  Nothing works right if you don’t have these two basics as your foundation. It’s hard to keep the great staff you have with lower market pay, and it’s hard to succeed with staff that are sub-par for what you need, and cannot adapt to what’s needed and next for your business.  

        

Make sure your hiring process is top-notch using behavioral and performance based questions and follow-through. Don’t hesitate to make change if staffing mistakes have been holding your business back from success.

       

2) Tune how you give feedback, people preferences matter First, GIVE the positive feedback. So many leaders do not do this.  Whether you are a colleague, peer leader or supervisor, 75% of people like to hear specifics about their good work, AND 25% do not. Tune what you say to your peers and direct reports to offer, in general, a 5-1 ratio of positive as well as performance improvement feedback.

    

Based in recent research,  the 5-1 ratio  creates credible feedback that builds intrinsic motivation and high performance teams. For the other 25% make sure they have resources and your full support to develop and excel. They don’t need much more than that.

    

3) Have performance conversations

Performance appraisal is a relic from the 20th century industrial age. Instead, have ongoing, informal performance conversations for both groups and one on one. 

   

4) Have a retention conversations

Retention conversations or “stay interviews,” a term coined from research by Dr. John Sullivan, a former talent executive, happen along with regular conversation with your peers and teams. These conversations include questions like:

      

What do you like best about working here?

What do you consider to be the best work you’ve ever done here?

If you could do your best work of your life, what would that be?
    

Also see on REVELN:  

       

     

Recent REVELN ScoopIt posts on this topic:


   
   
   
  • Stay in touch with the monthly Best of the Best news, taken from Deb’s  multi-gold award winning curation streams.  Preview it here,via REVELN Tools.

 


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

More questions for the "stay" conversation, which can be woven into regular conversations with your staff, peers and direct reports are in the original article here.  ~  Deb

more...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, April 1, 1:21 PM

What makes for best practices for 21st century talent retention? Review these 4 practices to see if your organization is up-to-date. ~  Deb

    

Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Toyota Learns via Hoshin Kanri, Help to Adapt for the Long Term

Toyota Learns via Hoshin Kanri, Help to Adapt for the Long Term | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

When the 2008 Lehman Brothers bankruptcy triggered a global recession, Toyota Motor Company lost money.   ... They were very unhappy about their loss, ...not because of the loss of a few billion dollars which they could absorb like an annoying mosquito bite. It was because, through serious reflection, they found serious weaknesses.


Of course they downsized...by reducing a temporary workforce designed to absorb inevitable downturns in the business cycle. Management bonuses and overtime were eliminated. Less energy was used. Travel was reduced. But the jobs of long-term team members were protected.

     


more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof
Scoop.it!

HBR: What Happens When All Employees Work When They Feel Like It? Prosperity & Health?

HBR:  What Happens When All Employees Work When They Feel Like It?  Prosperity & Health? | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Chopping up the total amount of work that needs to done in your firm into blocks that suit our human physiology has nothing to do with the actual work. If the total amount of work that needs to be done in a firm in one week equals 20,000 hours, it is just as arbitrary to chop that up into 500 40-hour work weeks as it is to chop it up into 800 blocks of 25 hours.

________________________________

Leaders ....realize[d] that for skilled people disillusioned with the [traditional] employment model ...there is a strong attraction to work tailored to their individual requirements. 

_______________________________


A five-day work week consisting of eight-hour days happens to be the social norm i...at present.  [However, consider] a company that disrupts that kind of social norm in its industry.  [It] could potentially build a momentous competitive advantage out of it.

An Example:    Eden McCallum has set itself up as a so-called “double-sided market,” tying together supply (consultants) and demand (clients) – similar to platforms like eBay, eHarmony, peer-to-peer betting company Betfair, or property search firm Zoopla.  Leaders at the firm realize that for skilled people disillusioned with the employment model of traditional firms, there is a strong attraction to work tailored to their individual requirements. This allows the firm to hire good employees at a good price. Clearly, there are other industries where the skill level of a firm’s employees is crucial for competitive advantage.

  

As for all Scoops, click on the photo or title to see the full article.

Related change & performance posts by Deb:

 

           

       

    


  • Stay in touch with the monthly Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  9 multi-gold award winning curation streams.  Preview it here via REVELN Tools.

 


Via Bonnie Hohhof
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

"New Work" thinking has been developing in the new economy and digital age for awhile.  Right now, Uber, the personal vehicle taxi service, via a "killer app," is a thorny but successful example at the time of this writing.  

Historically, "New Work and New Culture" ideas and ideals have been around by the likes of Frithjof Bergman, at the University of Michigan for several decades. 

Another alternative view is this. also on ScoopIt:  Change in the Nature of Work: The Case For "Antiwork" and the 20 hour Work Week  
 

"...we see the persistent belief that we can achieve 'full employment.' Rifkin showed empirically that this is nonsense, unless we create a lot of make-work, i.e., work for the sake of working. And that’s what, as a society, we seem to be doing. Everywhere you look there are stupid, pointless (and probably environmentally destructive) jobs."

 

  

What is needed are more business people and entrepreneurial saavy to create more opportunities to adapt to this new business thinking  that takes technological disruption seriously.

 

~  Deb

more...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, March 2, 12:47 PM

"New Work" thinking has been developing in the new economy and digital age for awhile.  Right now, Uber, the personal vehicle taxi service, via a "killer app," is a thorny but successful example at the time of this writing.  

Historically, "New Work and New Culture" ideas and ideals have been around by the likes of Frithjof Bergman, at the University of Michigan for several decades.

Another alternative view is this. also on ScoopIt:  Change in the Nature of Work: The Case For "Antiwork" and the 20 hour Work Week  
 

"...we see the persistent belief that we can achieve 'full employment.' Rifkin showed empirically that this is nonsense, unless we create a lot of make-work, i.e., work for the sake of working. And that’s what, as a society, we seem to be doing. Everywhere you look there are stupid, pointless (and probably environmentally destructive) jobs."

     

What is needed are more business people and entrepreneurial saavy to create more opportunities to adapt to this new business thinking  that takes technological disruption seriously.

 

~  Deb

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, April 1, 1:26 PM

"New Work" thinking has been developing in the new economy and digital age for awhile.  Right now, Uber, the personal vehicle taxi service, via a "killer app," is a thorny, problematic,  but so far an successful example at the time of this writing.  
    

Historically, "New Work and New Culture" ideas and ideals have been around by the likes of Frithjof Bergman, at the University of Michigan for several decades. 
     
Another alternative view is this. also on ScoopIt:  Change in the Nature of Work: The Case For "Antiwork" and the 20 hour Work Week.   ~  Deb

 

Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Future of Work
Scoop.it!

Major Trends Altering the Workplace Landscape

Major Trends Altering the Workplace Landscape | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Where will work be in the future? And where will workers be? The economic, social, and technological landscape is shifting rapidly. Here are some of the major trends altering the future workplace.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Read Mikkelsen's summary by clicking on the red "Reactions" below.  There's a lot there.   A good deal of it reminds me of 20th century industrial age corporatism.

An alternative is this: 


Change in the Nature of Work: The Case For "Antiwork" and the 20 hour Work Week 


 for these reasons:    

"...we see the persistent belief that we can achieve 'full employment.' Rifkin showed empirically that this is nonsense, unless we create a lot of make-work, i.e., work for the sake of working. And that’s what, as a society, we seem to be doing. Everywhere you look there are stupid, pointless (and probably environmentally destructive) jobs."

~  Deb

 

more...
Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, February 11, 5:39 PM

Among the many broad trends affecting the future workplace and workers are:


  • More workplace flexibility will be demanded by new highly skilled workers, but most workers will also accept the need to work longer total hours.
  • The “workplace” for any given job is likely to continue to spread over multiple time zones or continents, with workers connecting through a growing range of media channels.
  • There will be a greater premium placed on knowledge workers who ask constructive questions concerning an employer’s mission, as well as their customers, market values, desired results, and evolving marketing and business plans.
  • Workers and managers will focus more on simplifying workloads versus just getting it all done, which reduces the risk of missing critical innovation opportunities.
  • Managers will promote health and wellness programs that focus on helping workers quit smoking, lose weight, or deal with depression, because healthy employees are more productive and miss fewer days because of poor health.
  • Employers will embrace less-expensive employee recruiting through social networks (this reached 94% of employers this last year, reports Jobvite.com). And hirers are relying more on critical thinking skills tests like the Collegiate Learning Assessment, rather than on just college grades and degrees to assess candidates.
  • More than 75% of U.S. employees are almost continuously looking for work while employed, and they hold nearly a dozen different jobs on average before age 35.
  • Employers are using personal reputation (strong track records) to make hiring decisions and 75% of jobseekers are using company “brand” in the same way, even accepting a lower salary to work with a desired firm.
  • Approximately one-third of Americans in the workforce (17 million workers) are freelance contractors and consultants. This means more people working from home without employer-sponsored health-care benefits.
  • And 30% of U.S. workers are on flextime when working from home (or other locations) two to three days a week. As well, some studies have found increased productivity of as much as 15%–20% for these flextime workers.
Nedko Aldev's curator insight, February 14, 1:04 PM

add your insight...

375
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

The Biggest Career Killer of All Time: The Performance Review

The Biggest Career Killer of All Time: The Performance Review | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

[Here it goes:  Jenny's}  annual performance review.


Do you know where this was happening?


At Starbucks.


Her manager is giving her the results of her year-end performance in a public coffee shop. I know, because I was sitting at the table next to them as an innocent bystander.


What do you think Jenny is thinking right now while her manager is telling her this?


“Adobe ended performance reviews in 2012, after the employer noticed greater employee turnover after the annual reviews. [Their HR exec. said]...the reviews were an outdated process and made people feel like they were labeled.”


Schedule regular check-ins. I go out of my way to get feedback from my manager every two weeks. I put this on my client manager’s calendar as a recurring event.


Related posts by Deb:

    

     

     

    


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

There's more in the article about getting on your manager's schedule, asking questions.  I think you can go even farther than that, beyond "check-ins" - to act systemically.  Yet it is a significant step in the right direction toward ending what W. Edwards Deming called one of the "7 deadly diseases affecting management."  I've written about how to end, and begin anew.  Is it time for your organization?   Perhaps it's time to have a conversation.  If you'd like, you can contact me here for ways to begin.   ~  Deb

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Choice about Performance Feedback is Powerful! A 2014 Top Product Winner: Skillrater.com

Choice about Performance Feedback is Powerful! A 2014 Top Product Winner: Skillrater.com | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

     

What It Is:   Skillrater.com is a cloud-based performance-feedback tool that incorporates social networking and collaboration. It is designed to encourage employees, leaders, teams and organizations to collaborate and help each other improve over time. After completing any work activity, an employee can request a rating from a supervisor, peer, client or customer.   ….Skillrater's feedback is provided in the form of one-to-five ratings on day-to-day activities. 

    

__________________________

      

Employees are empowered to take control of their own development and advancement...so their good work gets noticed. 

   

__________________________

    

         

[Technology]:  Skillrater can also plug in to complement any integrated talent-management suite, such as Oracle Talent Cloud or SuccessFactors, or can be used as a stand-alone solution. It can also be used to help determine a return-on-investment in leadership-development programs and tracking talent data for various HR developmental and organizational initiatives.
     

Why We Like It: ...the ability to import LinkedIn profiles into the system were...highly valued by our team of judges... [W]e also liked that Skillrater enables employees to request feedback on their own work.

      

Employees are empowered to take control of their own development and advancement, and your most ambitious employees will want to request ratings often so their good work gets noticed. 

     

......we especially like how the product easily enables raters to include a positive, reinforcing message into a rating before delivering a critique. 

As always in REVELN ScoopIt news, click on the photo to see the full post.


Related posts by Deb:

     

            

              

      

        

                  

    • Stay in touch with the monthly Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  9 multi-gold award winning curation streams.  Preview it here, via REVELN Tools.


    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    This tool can be used to shift the conversation about performance to ***conversation*** about performance, rather than inspection, monitoring, and all that industrial age stuff that continues to plague performance management systems.

    I talked with Louis Carter today about Skillrater, and learned I was one of the first to comment on this new technology last year.   As of this posting, I'm interested in testing this product in an organization ready to update to more modern, less inspection-oriented performance support, focused on appreciation and encouragement, using ratios such as 5 to 1, positive to critique [disclosure.] 
       
    The 5 to 1 feedback ratio is based on research from the Positive Organizational Scholarship folks including the Univ. of Michigan Ross Business School.  A video describing how Skillrater works is here.   Lou's press release about Skillrater winning the 2014 award is here.
           
    If you'd like to have a conversation about trying out SkillRater with the perspective of a seasoned, Whole System Transformation (WST) and organization development consultant/coach like me, contact me here.  Thanks!   ~  Deb Nystrom, REVELN.com

    more...
    No comment yet.
    Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
    Scoop.it!

    The Sharing Economy = Freedom, Uncertainty and Risk. Good Gigs, or ‘Wage Slavery’?

    The Sharing Economy = Freedom, Uncertainty and Risk.  Good Gigs, or ‘Wage Slavery’? | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

    "Workers are their own bosses in the so-called sharing economy, but that flexibility also brings much uncertainty — and few of the protections of full-time work."
        

    Jennifer Guidry, 35, [uses] her own car to ferry around strangers for Uber, Lyft and Sidecar, ride services that let people summon drivers on demand via apps. She also assembles furniture and tends gardens for clients who find her on TaskRabbit, an online marketplace for chores.

        

    Her goal is to earn at least $25 an hour, on average. Raising three children with her longtime partner, Jeffrey Bradbury, she depends on the income to help cover her family’s food and rent. 

        

    “You don’t know day to day,” she said. “It’s very up in the air.”

         

    The sharing economy, whose sites and apps connect people seeking services with sellers of those services, Ms. Guidry is a microentrepreneur, an independent contractor who earns money by providing her skills, time or property to consumers in search of a lift, a room to sleep in, a dry-cleaning pickup, a chef, an organizer of closets.

        

    For those seeking a sideline, these services can provide extra income. …businesses like Airbnb, the short-term-stay broker; task brokers like TaskRabbit and Fiverr; on-demand delivery services like Postmates and Favor; and grocery-shopping services like Instacart.

         

    Six years ago, she had a full-time job as the controller at a small company. After she gave birth to her youngest son, her office asked her to work extended hours. She couldn’t both accommodate the company and take care of her newborn. So she ended up leaving her job.

       

    ...[With] continuing high unemployment, however, people like Ms. Guidry are less microentrepreneurs than microearners. They often work seven-day weeks, trying to assemble a living wage from a series of one-off gigs. …To reduce the risks, many workers toggle among multiple services.


    ....“If you did the calculations, many of these people would be earning less than minimum wage,” says Dean Baker, an economist who is the co-director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research in Washington. “You are getting people to self-exploit in ways we have regulations in place to prevent.”
       


    ====


    As always in our ScoopIt news, click on the photo, video or title to see the full Scooped post.

           

    Related tools & posts by Deb:

                   

          

           

    • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.  

     

    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    What will it take to make the adjustments needed to provide good wages and employment to most?  The market may not be kind to those on their own without the needed unique/hard to find talent.  I'll be following this topic using the tags "post-job" and "post job economy" as well as via related posts following the job experiences of millennials.  ~  D

    more...
    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, August 17, 2014 10:52 PM

    What will it take to make the adjustments needed to provide good wages and employment to most?  The market may not be kind to those on their own without the needed unique/hard to find talent.  I'll be following this topic using the tags "post-job" and "post job economy" as well as via related posts following the job experiences of millennials.  ~  D

    Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
    Scoop.it!

    How Avery-Dennison Does Strengths Right, Building Strong, Versatile Leadership Teams

    How Avery-Dennison Does Strengths Right, Building Strong, Versatile Leadership Teams | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

    A global manufacturer and distributor uses its Leading to Win program to promote a team spirit through recognizing strengths and weaknesses, getting everyone’s best contribution to the team, boosting team connectivity and resilience. Participants are encouraged to discuss and reconsider team roles and group dynamics.

    ___________________
       
    The result is not just stronger and more versatile leaders, but also stronger and more versatile teams.

         

    ___________________

          

    The program uses divergent perspectives and underrepresented strengths that often get neglected. Further, it illuminates blind spots so the team can avoid going overboard with shared strengths. The result is not just stronger and more versatile leaders, but also stronger and more versatile teams.

        

    From an individual and team perspective:   managers frequently don’t understand their strengths and therefore are prone to underdo or overdo them. Through self-awareness and effort they can make better use of their strengths. The approach also identifies weaknesses they can’t afford to ignore for both managers and teams.

        

    Summary reports present aggregate data from both assessments that team members analyze together to identify trends and their implications.

        
    The program uses divergent perspectives and underrepresented strengths that often get neglected. Further, it illuminates blind spots so the team can avoid going overboard with shared strengths. The result is not just stronger and more versatile leaders, but also stronger and more versatile teams.


     

    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    This piece features a balanced view of using strengths and weaknesses tools, featuring 360 feedback, for large organizations that have the resources and maturity to do 360 right.  360 processes can be easily under-resourced, which only creates more problems than it solves. 
       
    The two assessment tools central to the success of the program are (from the article):

        

    Realise2, a self-assessment of 60 strengths gauged according to performance, usage and energy. Results are sorted into four categories: realized strengths, unrealized strengths, learned behaviors and weaknesses.

       

    The Leadership Versatility Index, is a 360 that provides feedback on how co-workers observe strengths, learned behaviors and weaknesses. The LVI’s “Goldilocks” rating scale ranges from “too little” to “the right amount” to “too much.”

    Source:  Chief Learning Officer's August 2014 feature, "Strength is Not Enough."

    more...
    No comment yet.
    Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
    Scoop.it!

    Develop your Talent, Sponsor a Workshop during International Coaching Week in May

    Develop your Talent, Sponsor a Workshop during International Coaching Week in May | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

    Experience timely, current workshop topics  during International Coaching Week ~  May 19-25, 2014  - sponsored by the International Coaching Federation (ICF).

    Coach Café Ann Arbor is offering to selected local leaders pro-bono workshops and coaching from some of the top coaches in the Ann Arbor and South East Michigan area (Flint and Detroit included.)
     

    Why? We want to create awareness of the return on investment of coaching, as well as offering to you new educational partnerships in a win-win opportunity.  


    ______________________
       
    We must always change, renew, rejuvenate ourselves; otherwise we harden.
    ~ Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe

    ______________________


    Here’s the business case for professional coaching.  Of all clients who have engaged a coach,

    • 99% report satisfaction with the coaching experience,
    • 70% report improved work performance,
    • 80% report increased self confidence,
    • 68% individuals report financial return on investment,
    • 80% companies report financial return on investment.



    For South East Michigan and Ann Arbor, check out our local website here featuring ICW sample workshops here.   See photos from last year here.

    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    This is a great win-win talent development opportunity for your leaders, staff and faculty.  Coach, consultant biographies are also listed on the website and on the ICF Michigan website, as well as the national site for the International Coaching Federation.

    Now is a good time to reach out to one of the coaches and plan some workshops and coaching demonstrations for this special May event.   ~  Deb

    more...
    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, May 6, 2014 4:13 PM

    Add freshness to your company workshops experience and coaching by local, professionals.  Contact a coach listed on the main, local website here:  http://coachcafeannarbor.weebly.com/

    Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
    Scoop.it!

    Wirearchies = Adaptive, Two Way Flow of Power, Knowledge, with a Focus on Results

    Wirearchies = Adaptive, Two Way Flow of Power, Knowledge, with a Focus on Results | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

    Harold Jarche features Chee Chin Liew’s presentation on moving from hierarchies to teams at BASF.  It shows how IT Services used their technology platforms to enhance networking, knowledge-sharing, and collaboration.  


    It features an approach to “building flows of information into pertinent, useful and just-in-time knowledge” so that...  knowledge can flow in order to foster trust and credibility.

          

    ______________________________

        

    In complex environments, weak hierarchies and strong networks are the best organizing principle.   ...It means giving up control. 

       

    _______________________________
           
    Creating this two-way flow of dialogue, practice, expertise, and interest, can be the foundation of a 
    wirearchy.

    In complex environments, weak hierarchies and strong networks are the best organizing principle.


    ....many companies today have strong networks...coupled with strong central control. Becoming a wirearchy requires new organizational structures that incorporate communities, networks, and cooperative behaviours. It means giving up control. The job of those in leaderships roles is to help the network make better decisions. 



    Related tools & posts by Deb:


    See the companion post about Holacracy, here.

               

    • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here, via REVELN Tools.
            

              

          

     

    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    Harold Jarche highlights several useful models featuring two way information flow through power and authority. which helps build, if the culture allows it, adaptability into knowledge work.  


    As quoted in the article, much of this work has been "routinized and standardized with the ongoing marriages of business processes and integrated enterprise information systems."  This makes for a fragile system susceptible to disruption.  

    Building robust, two-way flows is essential to enable adaptability to the realities of continuous change and learning organizations ready to embrace disruption.  ~  D

    more...
    Helen Teague's curator insight, March 6, 2014 1:46 PM

    well worth the reading time.

    InflatableCostumes's curator insight, March 7, 2014 7:26 AM

     Manufacturers of Custom Shaped Cold Air Inflatables including Giant Character shapes and  Product Replicas also Rooftop Balloons specializing in custom inflatables for advertising, manufactured in Hyderabad city, India - http://www.inflatablecostumes.com

    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, August 17, 2014 2:23 PM

    I just featured the called out quote above about complexity (over complicated, bureaucratic), and less hierarchy, more communication via networks in my most recent post about letting go of industrial age thinking via the command and control nature of performance appraisals.  

    Wirearchy and holacracy (think Zappos) are alternatives that embrace networked learning.  One is arguably a set of principles, the latter is an organization design approach that deemphasizes management.

    ~  Deb

    Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
    Scoop.it!

    What is your Clock for Change? Coaching with the iWam, Work Attitude & Motivation

    What is your Clock for Change?  Coaching with the iWam, Work Attitude & Motivation | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

    This excerpt features the assessment tool, the iWAM, which reveals ‘change’ patterns as motivational patterns and shows us what our ‘Clock’ for change looks like.  iWam = the Inventory for Work Attitude & Motivation

    The iWAM “Clock” answers the question ..."After how many years one needs a significant change to be motivated again?"

    Learning about a top-performer’s need for change allows us to plan for the time when burnout would set in so that we can prevent it and retain our top talent.


    The information from the Clock also helps us make better career decisions and work-life planning.


    From the iWam website:


    The iWam is based on a model of cognitive thinking styles (48 parameters are measured and explained). The iWAM Management Report identifies a person's motivational and attitude preferences in the job context and predicts how this person will behave in various job types, such as administrative, customer contact or managerial tasks.

    The 
    iWAM Attitude Sorter predicts key motivational preferences and development areas. The questionnaire can be administered over the Internet or as a pen-and-paper test. The iWAM is currently available in more than 15 languages. Test administration takes 25 to 45 minutes.


    Source: http://www.theiwam.com/the-clock


    Photo by deux-chi, Flickr


    Related tools & posts by Deb:

        

    • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here, via REVELN Tools.


    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    The iWam is a moderate to advanced assessment instrument that is useful for looking at work attitudes and motivation.  Samples of iWam reports are here


    ~ Deb

    more...
    No comment yet.
    Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
    Scoop.it!

    Why Some Teams Perform Better than Others: The Secret Ingredient

    Why Some Teams Perform Better than Others: The Secret Ingredient | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

    Culture defines any business, yet it's also one of the hardest things to manage. In this extract from her TED Book, Margaret Heffernan describes the important, often-overlooked element necessary to build an effective, efficient organization: social capital."

         
    ...Having a high aggregate intelligence or just one or two superstars wasn’t critical. The groups that surfaced more and better solutions shared three key qualities.
       
    • First, they gave one another roughly equal time to talk. This wasn’t monitored or regulated, but no one in these high-achieving groups dominated or was a passenger. Everyone contributed and nothing any one person said was wasted.
       
    • The second quality ...was social sensitivity: these individuals were more tuned in to one another, to subtle shifts in mood and demeanor. They scored more highly on a test called Reading the Mind in the Eyes, which is broadly considered a test for empathy. 
    • The third distinguishing feature was that the best groups included more women, perhaps because that made them more diverse, or because women tend to score more highly on tests for empathy. What this (and much more) research highlights is just how critical the role of social connectedness can be.
        
       ...In large organizations, ...A functional head will challenge a regional head and then they will reverse roles. This way, they learn the exigencies and contingencies of both positions; they start to see common themes, ways they can help and support each other, and empathy grows.
           
    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    Social capital, here, features the ability to let go of a singular perspective and take on the perspective of another.  Here it is the key way to expand understanding and take on a system perspective more fully. The complexities of a system become accessible in empathy and social capital investment.  Business intelligence, in this way includes metrics and so much more.  ~  Deb

    more...
    No comment yet.
    Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
    Scoop.it!

    Accenture, Another Big Firm to get Rid of Annual Performance Reviews and Rankings

    Accenture, Another Big Firm to get Rid of Annual Performance Reviews and Rankings | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it
    As of September, one of the largest companies in the world will do all of its employees and managers an enormous favor: It will get rid of the annual performance review.

    Accenture CEO Pierre Nanterme told The Washington Post that the professional services firm, which employs hundreds of thousands of workers in cities around the globe, has been quietly preparing for this “massive revolution” in its internal operations.

    “Imagine, for a company of 330,000 people, changing the performance management process—it’s huge,” Nanterme said. “We’re going to get rid of probably 90 percent of what we did in the past.”

    The firm will disband rankings and the once-a-year evaluation process starting in fiscal year 2016, which for Accenture begins this September. It will implement a more fluid system, in which employees receive timely feedback from their managers on an ongoing basis following assignments.

    Accenture is joining a small but prominent list of major corporations that have had enough with the forced rankings, the time-consuming paperwork and the frustration engendered among managers and employees alike. Six percent of Fortune 500 companies have gotten rid of rankings, according to management research firm CEB.
    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    WHOA, Accenture is STILL using RANKINGS?  It is little wonder, then, that they are jettisoning 90% of their current system.  Rankings were considered OLD school in the 80s, based on lessons learned of the demoralization and loss of mentors via GE's vitality curve, also known as rank and yank.


    For context: GE and Jack Welch’s stack ranking policies, which focused on ranking employees and firing the lowest 10% of performers was credited, by proponents, with creating a 28-fold increase in earnings and a 5-fold increase in revenue at GE between 1981 and 2001. However, when other companies tried the same approach, it reportedly led to widespread dishonesty, mistrust, and productivity loss among workers.


    A 2013 survey by WorldatWork, quotes the method is used by about 12% of US corporations, whereas the The Corporate Executive Board Company, it is used by 29% of companies.[

    Rob Ender is quoted saying that downsides of stacked ranking, as one employee competes with aother, include how it disrupts collaboration and innovation as employees don't want somebody else to be successful. So it creates a culture of shutting down ideas.


    Generally, ranking systems seem akin to 20th century practices based in to Frederik Taylor's scientific management.  His work was more suited to starting up the industrial age, than helping us move fully into the information age and specialization.  ~  Deb




     



    That the firm "will implement a more fluid system, in which employees receive timely feedback from their managers on an ongoing basis following assignments" - seems like good old common sense. Of course, in follow-the-money hierarchies, common sense is not so common.

    If any of your followers are interested in alternatives, here's the piece I wrote on it: http://reveln.com/6-steps-beyond-industrial-age-performance-appraisals/

    more...
    No comment yet.
    Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
    Scoop.it!

    Flirting & Play: The Most Productive Way to Develop as a Leader | HBR

    Flirting & Play: The Most Productive Way to Develop as a Leader | HBR | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

    "Think of [leadership] self-improvement as play, not work."

        

    One of the biggest reasons we don’t stretch beyond our current selves is that we are afraid to suffer a hit to our performance. A playful posture might help John, [the case study shared] feel less defensive about his old identity [as if] he’s just practicing his bad swing.

    ______________________
       
     “people tend to flirt only with serious things — madness, disaster, other people.”

       

    _____________________

     

         

    Play generates variety not consistency, it allows our “shadow,” as Carl Jung called the unexpressed facets of our nature, fuller expression. John might, for example, sign up for some new projects and extracurricular activities, each a setting in which he’s free to rehearse behaviors that deviate from what people have come to expect of him. He’s not being mercurial; he’s just experimenting.

        

    Psychoanalyst Adam Phillips once said, “people tend to flirt only with serious things — madness, disaster, other people.” Flirting with your self is a serious endeavor because who we might become is not knowable or predictable at the outset. That’s why it’s as inherently dangerous as it is necessary for growth.


    Related posts by Deb:
          

            
              

         

    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    This brilliant, researched post highlights the dramatic change from the straight, and therefore narrow view of performance, vs. play to

    • 1) "borrow from different sources" creatively, to 
    • 2) be in a learning orientation, and 
    • 3) "generate variety." 

         

    In a VUCA world, full of complexity and ambiguity - this can take the edge off the terror of perfect performance, an unrealistic goal in many business situations far beyond performing live on the stage in the arts, but not unlike the "improv" where audience reaction is the immediate feedback system to help gauge success.. ~ Deb

    more...
    No comment yet.
    Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
    Scoop.it!

    Giving Feedback: Remembering the Ideal Praise-to-Criticism Ratio | HBR

    Giving Feedback: Remembering the Ideal Praise-to-Criticism Ratio | HBR | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

    The 5 to 1 ratio, "it’s the secret to high-performing teams — and strong marriages."  It's a classic feedback guide worth revisiting to do a self-check for the performance of your own business community.

    Excerpt:   

    The factor that made the greatest difference between the most and least successful teams, Heaphy and Losada found, was the ratio of positive comments: “I agree with that,” or “That’s a terrific idea”

    to negative comments:  “I don’t agree with you,” and “We shouldn’t even consider doing that,” that the participants made to one another. Negative comments could go as far as sarcastic or disparaging remarks. 

     
    The average ratio for the highest-performing teams was 5.6, nearly six positive comments for every negative one. The medium-performance teams averaged 1.9, almost twice as many positive comments than negative ones. Low-performing teams were at 0.36 to 1, almost three negative comments for every positive one.
         
    The research, conducted by academic Emily Heaphy and consultant Marcial Losada, examined the effectiveness of 60 strategic-business-unit leadership teams at a large information-processing company. “Effectiveness” was measured according to financial performance, customer satisfaction ratings, and 360-degree feedback ratings of the team members.
        
    Related posts by Deb, :

     

    6 Choices for High Performance Teams, Groups and Psuedo-Teams: Achievement Is How You Say It!


    3 Success Factors for High Performance Teams, and What Gets In the Way  (Includes M. Losada research)


    Beyond Resilience: Givers, Takers, Matchers and Anti-Fragile Systems

    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    This research is very useful for peer feedback & teams, as well as leaders.  It helps organizations improve strategic and adaptive thinking, doing, as well as becoming more resilient and "antifragile.'  ~  Deb

    more...
    No comment yet.
    Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
    Scoop.it!

    Board Members and the Trouble With Stock Compensation & Social Responsibility

    Board Members and the Trouble With Stock Compensation & Social Responsibility | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

    "Could board pay be contributing to corporate actions that brought about BP’s Gulf of Mexico oil spill and the 2008 financial crisis?"


    Paying outside board members with equity grants is becoming increasingly popular. Unfortunately, new research suggests that it leads to companies with less socially responsible behavior. This investigation comes at a time of public outcry over business actions that have had a negative impact on societal and environmental interests, including BP’s oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010 and the 2008 financial crisis.


    _____________________
     
    "...director stock compensation in a given year exhibited higher financial performance in later years [and] lower levels of responsibility to communities"...

    _____________________

       

    Research into social performance ratings and director compensation data for more than 1,100 U.S. public companies between 1998 and 2006 showed that while companies with high levels of outside director stock compensation in a given year exhibited higher financial performance in later years, “they also showed lower levels of responsibility to communities as measured by their charitable giving, relations with indigenous peoples, community employment and economic development, and support for basic public services,” write Yuval Deutsch and Mike Valente (both of Schulich School of Business, York University). 

      
    A similar effect was evident with environmental performance and with human rights measures.

       

    The findings suggest that paying outside directors with stock incentivizes them to ignore other stakeholders.


    Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor
    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    Problems with compensation create a whole range of unintended consequences, even disasters.  This view of executive and board leadership pay is worth a look from an ethical, values based perspective as well as a monetary one.  ~  Deb

    more...
    Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's curator insight, August 13, 2013 6:30 PM

    Does paying outside board members with equity grants lead to less socially responsible behavior?

    Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
    Scoop.it!

    Ditching performance reviews for annual conversations that really work

    Ditching performance reviews for annual conversations that really work | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

    Reimagining performance in organizations results in astounding leaps in focus, growth and productivity.  "There are alternatives, and it might be easier than you think."  This scoop summarizes how it works, from HopeLab. 

       

    Excerpted:

         
    "Like Adobe, we have also dismantled the traditional performance review and replaced it with ...the Annual Conversation... It's intended to inspire ...generative conversation about performance ...at a deeper level than might occur in regular supervision meetings throughout the year, " says Chris Marcell Murchison, Vice President Staff Development & Culture at HopeLab

     

    ________________
       
    As a result, some staff, including managers, make astounding leaps in focus, growth and productivity.”

    ________________
       
       
      

    Results   “Our staff look forward to their Annual Conversations and the impact on our culture has been profound. Employees report that they feel seen, heard, appreciated, and supported. As a result, some staff, including managers, make astounding leaps in focus, growth and productivity.”

        

    How it works:

       

    Questions We've created questions to help guide Annual Conversations. …We crowdsource questions from the entire organization and employees can add any questions they like to the basic list.


    Examples include, 

    "What are you working on when you feel the most purposeful? 

    Why is this activity meaningful to you?" 

    "What would you attempt to do in the next year if you knew you could not fail? 

        

    Location Employees choose a location for the meeting.

        

    Time …Typically most last anywhere from two to four hours.  …The manager and employee to decide what works best for them.

        

    Non-evaluation The Annual Conversation is not an evaluation of past performance; it's a chance to reflect [and] understand… what's working and what's not, with an eye to setting future goals and enhancing growth and performance. There are no lgrades or performance rankings of any sort.

        

    Merit …The Annual Conversation is not coupled to merit or incentive pay. These decisions are made separately and communicated outside the framework of the Annual Conversation.

        

    Manager. There is nothing for her to prepare. [Her role is to] focus her attention on her direct report, listen, and ask questions to help deepen reflection.  

    As for all Scoops, click on the photo or title to see the full article.

    Related change & performance posts by Deb:

                

          

        

        
    • Curing ONE of the Seven Deadly Diseases of Management, Performance Appraisals

                 

    • Stay in touch with the monthly Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  9 multi-gold award winning curation streams.  Preview it here, via REVELN Tools.

     

    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    I'm hopeful in 2015 that more organizations will be able to make the commitment to a multiyear process of letting go of industrial age (inspection oriented, 20th century) performance practices to give practices like the Annual Conversation a try.  It's possible to jump even further away from a manager, individual employee model.  Find out more here.   ~  Deb

    more...
    No comment yet.
    Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
    Scoop.it!

    Ditching the Performance Appraisal in Favor of Performance Conversations

    Ditching the Performance Appraisal in Favor of Performance Conversations | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

    Just 2 percent of human resources professionals reported in a recent Society for Human Resource Management survey that their organizations deserve an A grade in performance management, while 53 percent reported their organizations deserved between a C+ and a B. Twenty-one percent gave their organizations a C.

         

    ___________________
       
    ....More and more companies, including...Adobe...and Microsoft Corp., have opted recently to ditch the traditional performance review process for ...ongoing performance conversations.

    ___________________
          
    The survey included nearly 400 randomly selected HR professionals in the United States who are SHRM members.

    When asked about the challenges keeping their firms from getting a high performance management grade, HR professionals cited:

    • lack of managerial time,
    • insufficient training,
    • higher business priorities,
    • inconsistent evaluation standards and
    • lack of training.


    ....More and more companies, including technology firms Adobe Systems Inc. and Microsoft Corp., have opted recently to ditch the traditional performance review process for more frequent, ongoing performance conversations.


    Related posts by Deb, including my mention of Adobe's work:

         

                

                  

    • Stay in touch with the monthly Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  multi-gold award winning curation streams.  Preview it here,via REVELN Tools.
    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    The bulleted list in this article is the reason that performance management will continue to be a losing proposition.  Instead, switch the focus to performance conversations.  It puts the emphasis where it belongs, less on inspection, more to acknowledgement of what works and support for the work within the system.  ~  D

    more...
    No comment yet.
    Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Change Management Resources
    Scoop.it!

    Letting Go: 6 Steps Beyond Industrial Age Performance Appraisals

    Letting Go:  6 Steps Beyond Industrial Age Performance Appraisals | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

    "It takes courage, tenacity and teamwork to let go of performance appraisal practices and industrial age thinking.  In our  post 9-11, post financial meltdown, "New Normal,"  business will never be as it was.  Can we let go?"


    A1998 article about ending appraisals in favor of the APOP, the Annual Piece of Paper is one way to go.   Using an approach like the APOP or a two box annual conversation method, Meets [or Exceeds], Does not Meet, as mentioned in the video, is a step in the right direction. It is a form of incremental change, very similar to the Adobe Systems “check-ins” featured here in more detail.  Adobe’s 2012 system moved away from individualized ranking and ratings.  


    The full post includes a short video that features asking a "beautiful question:      


    Why are we doing things the way we’ve been doing them the past 20 years—what if we tried a whole new approach?      Thank you Warren Berger, author of “A Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas (2014)


    It also covers why using Pass / Fail evaluation systems can help.


    See the video and full post here.


    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    This is my own video and post about performance review systems or appraisals.

    The video embodies the D X V X F > R, change model, originally invented by Gleicher and popularized by Kathie Dannemiller.   The video covers assessing readiness, Dissatisfaction, the need to explain why make a change, the Vision, and First Steps to overcome Resistance to Change - along with our our Industrial Age / command and control, Theory X (McGregor) mindsets.  


    A new path is emerging, but it is a slow path in business.  ~  Deb 

    more...
    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, August 19, 2014 12:59 PM

    This is my own video and post about performance review systems or appraisals.  It  is embedded within change principles, which is why I've posted it here as well as in the Talent & Performance Development curation news.    The video embodies the D X V X F > R, change model, originally invented by Gleicher and popularized by Kathie Dannemiller.   The video covers assessing readiness, Dissatisfaction, the need to explain why make a change, the Vision, and First Steps to overcome Resistance to Change - along with our our Industrial Age / command and control, Theory X (McGregor) mindsets.  

    A new path is emerging, but it is a slow path in business.  ~  Deb 

    Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
    Scoop.it!

    Entrepreneurship and 3 Factors to Survive in the Post-Job Economy

    Entrepreneurship and 3 Factors to Survive in the Post-Job Economy | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

    "A knowledge era is a fine thing, it sounds great … for a minority of people. So how do we (re)find a balance between jobs and people having them?""  How do people adapt to a post-job society?  


    One of my clients is an educational institution and I was heartened to learn that they are moving away from job preparation to a focus on entrepreneurship. They see the numbers. Their graduates are not getting jobs. Creating our own work will be the only option for many of us.


    Ross Dawson provides some good advice on what we can do to prepare for a post-job economy.


    As I often say, in a connected world, unless your skills are world-class, you are a commodity.   However there are three domains in which individuals and organizations can transcend commoditization and push their value creation to the other end of the spectrum, where they can command their price and choose their work.


    The three domains are:

      • EXPERTISE
      • RELATIONSHIPS
      • INNOVATION 



    As always in our ScoopIt news, click on the photo, video or title to see the full Scooped post.

        

    Recent and related posts by Deb:

          

          

           

        

           

    • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.  
    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    The post-job economy is hitting the unemployed and the millennial generation hard.  There will be reinvention, but how?  This is one of a number of posts I'll be scooping this year with the tag "post-job" and "post job economy" to explore this concept in depth in 2014.   ~  D

    more...
    No comment yet.
    Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
    Scoop.it!

    Adobe’s New Approach to Abolishing the Yearly Performance Appraisal: The Details

    Adobe’s New Approach to Abolishing the Yearly Performance Appraisal: The Details | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

    Adobe is blazing a trail.  Rosemary Arriada-Keiper, Head of Rewards at Adobe reviews several of the compensation details of their new program.


    1)  Has Adobe completely done away with performance appraisals (evaluating past performance)?

    Rosemary: Yes, we no longer have performance appraisals.  While we still believe we need to evaluate performance, we believe this should be done on an on-going basis through regular feedback provided during “check-ins”.  These are on-going discussions between employees and managers about goals, status against them, what is working, what is not, whether goals need to be modified or reprioritized given the environment, etc.   ...These “check-ins” are not written. ...We encourage at a minimum that "check-ins" happen quarterly but we typically see monthly in practice.


    2) Has Adobe completely stopped giving performance ratings?
     

    Rosemary:  Correct, we no longer provide a rating.  ... because of  “check-ins” both managers and employees should have a very good sense of performance by the time managers need to make compensation recommendations.

    4)   You mention there are rewards for key talent.  How are key/high performers selected...? 


    Rosemary:  We have a separate process for that whereby discussions about key talent happen with leadership in the respective organizations.  We do identify who they are and they are “tagged” in the system as Key Talent (yes/no) but no rating per se. 

    Key talent receives stock although occasionally they get cash.  Both managers and individual contributors are eligible.  The total pool is no more than 2% of the employee population.
     

    5)  What has been the response from both managers and employees about this change in program?

     

    Rosemary: Very positive. There’s lots of relief around not having to write annual performance reviews and label employees a certain way.  That said, the conversations managers have with their employee has had to shift from “these are the guidelines given to me by HR [to} push[ing}  managers to own their decisions and be able to articulate them (and defend if challenged). 


    Related tools & posts by Deb:

          

    • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streamsfrom @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here, via REVELN Tools.

             

                  


    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    Adobe made a huge jump away from their reviled stack ranking system, a move that even raised their stock prices.  

    These are four (4) highlights from a longer article by Compensation Café shows how the revamped review, now called "check-in" without documentation, and the compensation system is now handled at Adobe.   Gone are the rankings, the yearly appraisal and ratings.

    According to the head of "Rewards" at Adobe, it's been received quite positively.   It's certainly a step in the right direction.  It isn't really all that new.  The APOP or "Annual Piece of Paper" process described by an article in Fast Company in 1998 is very similar.  Here's the link.   I'll have more to say about it in my next blog post on REVELN.com.

    ~  Deb

    more...
    No comment yet.
    Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
    Scoop.it!

    18 Things Highly Creative People Do Differently

    18 Things Highly Creative People Do Differently | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

    Creativity works in mysterious and often paradoxical ways. 
          

    Neuroscience paints a complicated picture of creativity, far more complex than the right-left brain distinction would have us think (the theory being that left brain = rational and analytical, right brain = creative and emotional).

         

    ....psychologically, creative personality types are ... complex, paradoxical and tend to avoid habit or routine. ...not just a stereotype of the "tortured artist" -- artists really may be more complicated people.

        

    Scott Barry Kaufman, a psychologist at New York University who has spent years researching creativity, [said], "Imaginative people have messier minds."

       

    Excerpts from the full list of 18:
         
    They daydream.   Creative types know that daydreaming is anything but a waste of time.   ...mind-wandering can aid in the process of "creative incubation." ...from experience [we know] that our best ideas come seemingly out of the blue when our minds are elsewhere.

        

    They observe everything.

    Henry James is widely quoted, a writer is someone on whom "nothing is lost."
        
    They take time for solitude."In order to be open to creativity, one must have the capacity for constructive use of solitude. One must overcome the fear of being alone," wrote the American existential psychologist Rollo May. 

         

    They turn life's obstacles around.  Specifically, researchers have found that trauma can help people to grow in the areas of interpersonal relationships, spirituality, appreciation of life, personal strength, and -- most importantly for creativity -- seeing new possibilities in life.

         


    They take risks.


    .... "Creativity is the act of making something from nothing. It requires making public those bets first placed by imagination. This is not a job for the timid. Time wasted, reputation tarnished, money not well spent -- these are all by-products of creativity gone awry."


        


    They make time for mindfulness.


    Creative types understand the value of a clear and focused mind -- because their work depends on it. Many artists, entrepreneurs, writers and other creative workers, such as David Lynch,  have turned to meditation as a tool for tapping into their most creative state of mind.


    Related tools & posts by Deb:

          

    • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here, via REVELN Tools.
              
           

             


    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    It's helpful to see this 2014 version of what distinguishes creatives, updated with mindfulness practice, yet listing daydreaming in the first, #1 spot.  The article offers a quote from the writer Joan Didion's notebook , "We are talking about something private, about bits of the mind’s string too short to use, an indiscriminate and erratic assemblage with meaning only for its marker."  ~  D

    more...
    Robin Martin's curator insight, March 6, 2014 10:14 PM

    Thanks for sharing this, Deb! Loved it!

    Christi Krug's curator insight, May 6, 2014 11:11 AM

    I can relate to this! "Imaginative people have messier minds."

    Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
    Scoop.it!

    Classic, Systemic Performance Insight > Better: A Surgeon's Notes on Performance

    Classic, Systemic Performance Insight > Better: A Surgeon's Notes on Performance | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

    Why the best doctors are so good, and how the rest can learn to improve.  These are useful, classic lessons for all of us in better understanding performance, both individual and systemic.


    Excerpts:


    Gawande divides the essays into three sections — “Diligence,” “Doing Right” and “Ingenuity” — based on the components “for success in medicine or in any endeavor that involves risk and responsibility.”

    Each essay focuses on a problem — the importance of hand-washing, health care delivery in India, the role of physicians in executions — that Gawande uses to anchor wide-ranging reflections.

    ...Gawande shows us that hand-washing turns out to be a profoundly complex and... that the moral obligations of physicians to death-row patients are not as clear as life and death, and that providing care to the poorest in the world takes a degree of ingenuity that should be categorized not simply as “better” but as downright heroic.


    Related tools & posts by Deb:

          

    • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here, via REVELN Tools.

             

                  

          
    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    I highly recommend this well written collection of insightful performance stories.   

    Gawande demonstrates how focusing on patients, performance and the big picture, the system, leads to improvement for people and the profession.    So much change fails, as he illustrates, without systemic intervention and peer-to-peer learning and engagement.

    He uses history, story, numbers and his own experience to provide compelling insights useful to understanding systems thinking in performance.  

    His early examples and accounts of of controlling infection in hospitals provides an excellent view of how difficult it is to make changes in systems, and that it also is possible, and heroic to affect change with the right approach as well as dogged determination. ~ D

    more...
    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, February 20, 2014 2:19 PM

    The book isn't new, but its insights into improving performance is compelling in using case examples for how challenging it is to help  change take hold in complex, resistant to systems - even when the intent to change is strong. ~ D

    Richard Platt's curator insight, February 25, 2014 9:39 AM

    This is also an excellent example of how to understand and create Use Cases.  


    The original curator of this scoop, Deb from Revelyn Highly recommended this collection of insightful performance stories.  

    Gawande demonstrates how focusing on patients, performance and the big picture, the system, leads to improvement for people and the profession.  

    He uses history, story, numbers and his own experience to provide compelling insights useful to understanding systems thinking in performance.  His early examples and accounts of of controlling infection in hospitals provides an excellent view of how difficult it is to make changes in systems, and that it also is possible, and heroic to affect change with the right approach as well as dogged determination.