Talent and Performance Development
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Talent and Performance Development
Making sense of performance and talent development systems to create & sustain high performance in organizations. For the BEST of the BEST curated news in performance, change, agile learning, innovation, motivation, social media and careers, SUBSCRIBE to Reveln.com/Tools/
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Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Talent Questions for the 21st Century Workplace

Talent Questions for the 21st Century Workplace | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

New, innovative, and agile approaches to talent management are urgently needed to keep up with future business needs.

   

The changing nature of work coupled with the changing face of the workforce creates new employer-employee dynamics. If the challenge facing large organizations is in the shift from production to producing, the social challenge facing large companies is in the changing demographics of the workforce and in how producing gets done. This creates complexities and challenges for fresh talent. Knowledge workers require different conditions to produce.


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How will social communities and technologies amplify one's ability to leverage experience [in the new workplace]?

   

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Top-down organizations are too bureaucratic and cannot react to market changes quickly or adequately. These hierarchical structures are being replaced by dynamic social structures. Wisdom of the crowd networks fuels new forms of innovation, collaboration, and productivity. Organizations must establish collaborative approaches to deliberately form networks and social communities to get new and different forms of work accomplished.

    

Talent on demand

…Being an employee of a particular company [is an] organization model that has been growing obsolete during the past two decades, largely due to globalization and automation.

The onset of the information economy brings forth opportunities for an on-demand talent market, where individuals and global project teams will bid on high-value tasks and opportunities. 

  • How will talent leaders design projects so they can be parsed out to talent communities? 
  • How will employees engage with just-in-time employers? 
  • How will performance be managed?

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Organizations must establish collaborative approaches to deliberately form networks and social communities to get new and different forms of work accomplished.

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Rethink performance management

  • Today's systems are designed to support Industrial Age organizations.  Can data analytics and dashboards track relevant indicators or predictors of business and performance?
  • Can we imagine…on-demand access to rolling dashboards and Yelp-like sites that provide immediate (systemic and) constructive feedback against current projects and initiatives? (Parens, DN)


Re-imagine career planning

Within an open talent market, workers will be on point to develop their own careers over a portfolio of integrative experiences.

  • How will talent development professionals re-imagine how careers are developed through their organizations?
  • What processes need to be in place?
  • How will social communities and technologies amplify one's ability to leverage experiences across a variety of settings and situations?
  • How do we approach career planning in much more dynamic ways?
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The theme here:  21st century talent for a changing and changed workplace.  It's helpful to review these questions and think of more that need answers as we adapt to the realities before us as work changes.  ~  Deb

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Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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How To Deal With A Bullying Boss

How To Deal With A Bullying Boss | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it
Are you a victim of workplace bullying? Here's what to do.


Excerpts:

Namie says confronting the boss is “rarely effective and ill-advised.” In early 2012, WBI asked 1,598 individuals who were personally familiar with workplace bullying what strategies they adopted to get their bullying to stop, and whether those actions were effective. Here’s what they said (excerpted):


  • About 38% of bullied employees essentially did nothing. In other words, he or she let time pass, hoping matters would improve on their own. Effectiveness of doing nothing: 3.25%

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“Employers are responsible for all work conditions and the assignment of workers to supervisors..."

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  • About 70% of employees directly confronted the perpetrator. Effectiveness of confronting: 3.57%
    
  • About 34% of bullied workers tried to find an attorney to file a lawsuit.    Effectiveness of finding an attorney: 11.2%
   

“Employers are responsible for all work conditions and the assignment of workers to supervisors,” Namie says. “So, employers can stop workplace bullying if they wanted to. 


No laws yet compel action or policies, so all employer actions would be voluntary.” About 68% of executives think workplace bullying is a serious problem—but few organizations (5.5%) are doing anything about it.

 

Related posts by Deb:


     

     


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This article has great references and on-target strategies on a persistent problem in organizations.  Attention, prevention and intervention are key categories to making a dent in boss bullying.  


Note that, only 5.5% are doing anything about bullying, though almost 70% think it is a problem.  ~  Deb

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Amazon’s Social Rift: Ongoing Rank and Yank and Work / Life Non-Balance, NYT Video

Amazon’s Social Rift: Ongoing Rank and Yank and Work / Life Non-Balance, NYT Video | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it
The recent New York Times article about Amazon inspired an unprecedented online conversation about workplace stress.


This video features highlights of the thousands of comments posted on the web.


_____________________________
   
...[Amazon seeks]  to manage out a certain percentage of its work force annually. The number varies from year to year.


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From another New York Time article dated August 17th, 2015, is error about Amazon's performance culture:


An article by Amazon engineer, Nick Ciubotariu, was circulated by Amazon’s public relations department after The Times article was published. Mr. Ciubotariu describes strengths of the workplace, including focus on customers and innovation. He also wrote that “no one” was encouraged to “toil long and late,” and dismissed the concerns expressed by many women at the company, which does not include any women on its top leadership team.

    

His points contradicted the accounts of many former and current colleagues, and some of his assertions were incorrect, including a statement that the company does not cull employees on an annual basis. An Amazon spokesman previously confirmed that the company sought to manage out a certain percentage of its work force annually. The number varies from year to year.

 


Related culture & performance posts by Deb:

      

   
   
   



Photo credit:  Soumit Nandi Flickr Creative Commons

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This brief 30 second video (click on the title or photo or link) is definitely worth a look on what a very large, 21st century profit and high growth minded company with a competitive culture looks like.  Amazon also features a traditional, 20th century, performance "rank and yank" evaluation system. It is more euphemistically called the Vitality Curve, or as stated above, managing out a certain percentage of its work force annually.  

Rank and yank can be a welcome temporary purge to a company that struggling.  Organizations that are stuck in the past, burdened with lower performance staff, or other low performance ills have had some success with the "Vitality Curve. Yet for the company to use it consistently, rather than temporarily speaks volumes on what is important and not important at Amazon.  ~ Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, August 19, 2015 1:08 PM

This brief 30 second video is definitely worth a look on what a very large, 21st century profit and high growth minded company with a competitive culture looks like.  Amazon also features a traditional, 20th century, performance "rank and yank" evaluation system. It is more euphemistically called the Vitality Curve, or as stated above, managing out a certain percentage of its work force annually.  

While "rank and yank" can be a welcome temporary purge to a company that is stuck, burdened with lower performance staff, and so forth, to use it consistently, rather than temporarily speaks volumes on what is important and not important at Amazon.  


Also posted in Talent and Performance Development.  ~ Deb